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[2009 3M clinical award for innovation. Home care: collaboration between nurses' aide and nurse].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143928
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2010 May-Jun;7(3):7
Publication Type
Article

Acceptance and importance of clinical pharmacists' LIMM-based recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127887
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2012 Apr;34(2):272-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Asa Bondesson
Lydia Holmdahl
Patrik Midlöv
Peter Höglund
Emmy Andersson
Tommy Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. asa.c.bondesson@skane.se
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2012 Apr;34(2):272-6
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Male
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Medication Reconciliation - organization & administration
Medication Therapy Management - organization & administration - standards
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Pharmacists - organization & administration - psychology
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Physicians - psychology
Quality of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of the clinical pharmacy service in a Swedish hospital according to the Lund Integrated Medicine Management (LIMM) model, in terms of the acceptance and clinical significance of the recommendations made by clinical pharmacists.
The clinical significance of the recommendations made by clinical pharmacists was assessed for a random sample of inpatients receiving the clinical pharmacy service in 2007. Two independent physicians retrospectively ranked the recommendations emerging from errors in the patients' current medication list and actual drug-related problems according to Hatoum, with rankings ranging between 1 (adverse significance) and 6 (extremely significant).
The random sample comprised 132 patients (out of 800 receiving the service). The clinical significance of 197 recommendations was assessed. The physicians accepted and implemented 178 (90%) of the clinical pharmacists' recommendations. Most of these recommendations, 170 (83%), were ranked 3 (somewhat significant) or higher.
This study provides further evidence of the quality of the LIMM model and confirms that the inclusion of clinical pharmacists in a multi-professional team can improve drug therapy for inpatients. The very high level of acceptance by the physicians of the pharmacists' recommendations further demonstrates the effectiveness of the process.
PubMed ID
22252773 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active interprofessional education in a patient based setting increases perceived collaborative and professional competence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154632
Source
Med Teach. 2009 Feb;31(2):151-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Karin Hallin
Anna Kiessling
Annika Waldner
Peter Henriksson
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Med Teach. 2009 Feb;31(2):151-7
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Satisfaction
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Female
Hospitals
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Male
Professional Competence - standards
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Sweden
Teaching - methods
Abstract
Interprofessional competence can be defined as knowledge and understanding of their own and the other team members' professional roles, comprehension of communication and teamwork and collaboration in taking care of patients.
To evaluate whether students perceived that they had achieved interprofessional competence after participating in clinical teamwork training.
Six hundred and sixteen students from four undergraduate educational programs-medicine, nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy-participated in an interprofessional course at a clinical education ward. The students filled out pre and post questionnaires (96% response rate).
All student groups increased their perceived interprofessional competence. Occupational therapy and medical students had the greatest achievements. All student groups perceived improved knowledge of the other three professions' work (p = 0.000000) and assessed that the course had contributed to the understanding of the importance of communication and teamwork to patient care (effect size 1.0; p = 0.00002). The medical students had the greatest gain (p = 0.00093). All student groups perceived that the clarity of their own professional role had increased significantly (p = 0.00003). Occupational therapy students had the greatest gain (p = 0.000014).
Active patient based learning by working together in a real ward context seemed to be an effective means to increase collaborative and professional competence.
PubMed ID
18937139 View in PubMed
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[Adaptation of the continuity of care for mental retardation and dementia. Experiences from Kristianstad demonstrate the need of interventions near the patient ].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124980
Source
Lakartidningen. 2012 Mar 28-Apr 3;109(13):698-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ann-Marie Liljeroth
Ann-Charlotte Palm
Author Affiliation
Enheten för kognitiv medicin, minnesmottagningen, Centralsjukhuset, Kristianstad. ann-marie.liljeroth@skane.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2012 Mar 28-Apr 3;109(13):698-9
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Continuity of Patient Care
Dementia - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Hospital Units - organization & administration
Humans
Intellectual Disability - complications - psychology - therapy
Interdisciplinary Communication
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Sweden
PubMed ID
22530468 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advancing interdisciplinary health research: a synergism not to be denied.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167325
Source
CMAJ. 2006 Sep 26;175(7):761
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-26-2006
Author
Paul W Armstrong
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta. paul.armstrong@ualberta.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2006 Sep 26;175(7):761
Date
Sep-26-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Government
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Industry
Interdisciplinary Communication
Interprofessional Relations
Organizational Culture
Universities
Notes
Cites: J Health Serv Res Policy. 2004 Jul;9(3):177-8315272977
Cites: CMAJ. 2006 Sep 26;175(7):763-7117001059
Cites: Clin Invest Med. 2005 Apr;28(2):43-515909477
Comment On: CMAJ. 2006 Sep 26;175(7):763-7117001059
PubMed ID
17001058 View in PubMed
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Alternative and complementary treatment needs and experiences of women with breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116662
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2013 Jul;19(7):657-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Christiane Brems
Jodi Barnett
Virginia Cress Parret
Jesse Metzger
Mark E Johnson
Author Affiliation
School of Professional Psychology, Pacific University, Hillsboro, OR 97123, USA. cbrems@pacificu.edu
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2013 Jul;19(7):657-63
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Complementary Therapies - utilization
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Middle Aged
Quality of Life - psychology
Survivors - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The study objectives were to explore the potential need for and use of complementary and alternative (CAM) services among women diagnosed with breast cancer and to investigate reasons for nonreceipt of CAM.
The Alaska Breast Cancer Needs Assessment Survey was completed by female breast cancer survivors in Alaska. The survey assessed physical and psychologic symptoms, services received, satisfaction with treatment, communication with providers, and informational needs. Survey responses were obtained from 309 women with breast cancer, with a mean age of 56 years and high level of education.
Results revealed that most breast cancer survivors have significant needs for CAM services, and yet only a small proportion actually receives them. For example, virtually all women reported symptoms potentially amenable to treatment via individual counseling or nutritional interventions; however, only 29% and 45%, respectively, received such services. Women who did and those who did not receive CAM services (e.g., counseling, massage, meditation, and supplementation) generally did not differ in terms of their need for such services as measured via symptoms that could be supported by these interventions. However, the majority failed to be referred for such treatments or were unable to access them if referred.
Results suggest that while access to services played a small role in nonreceipt of CAM services, the largest reason for CAM nonreceipt was failure to recognize their potential benefit on the part of providers and at least some patients. Raising awareness about the potential value of CAM among care providers for women with breast cancer is crucial, as it will likely lead to more CAM acceptance and utilization. Once providers accept and refer for CAM, patients' quality of life may be considerably enhanced, as the extant literature has demonstrated the potential value of CAM for breast cancer survivors.
PubMed ID
23373443 View in PubMed
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An agenda for occupational therapy's contribution to collaborative chronic disease research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133487
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2011 Jun;78(3):147-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Carri L Hand
Lori J Letts
Claudia M von Zweck
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, 1400 Main St. W. Hamilton, ON, L8S 1C7. handc@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2011 Jun;78(3):147-55
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical Research - organization & administration
Canada
Chronic Disease - prevention & control - rehabilitation
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Occupational Therapy - organization & administration
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Abstract
To meet the needs of adults with chronic diseases, Canadian health care is moving toward more interdisciplinary, collaborative practice. There is limited high-quality evidence to support practice in this area. Occupational therapists can play a significant role in this area of practice and research.
To develop an agenda of priority areas within collaborative chronic disease research to which occupational therapy can make a contribution.
The project involved literature and Internet review, a consensus meeting with a range of stakeholders, a survey of occupational therapists, and synthesis of findings to create a research agenda.
An interdisciplinary and intersectoral group of stakeholders identified seven main priority areas. One priority is specific to occupational therapy while the remaining six cross disciplines.
The research agenda can support funding applications and encourage interdisciplinary research collaboration to ultimately produce research evidence that can benefit people with chronic diseases.
PubMed ID
21699008 View in PubMed
Less detail

An approach to integrating interprofessional education in collaborative mental health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124943
Source
Acad Psychiatry. 2012 Mar 1;36(2):91-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2012
Author
Vernon Curran
Olga Heath
Tanis Adey
Terrance Callahan
David Craig
Taryn Hearn
Hubert White
Ann Hollett
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada. vcurran@mun.ca
Source
Acad Psychiatry. 2012 Mar 1;36(2):91-5
Date
Mar-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cooperative Behavior
Curriculum
Education, Medical - methods
Faculty
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Interprofessional Relations
Mental health services
Newfoundland and Labrador
Patient care team
Problem-Based Learning - methods
Students, Medical
Universities
Abstract
This article describes an evaluation of a curriculum approach to integrating interprofessional education (IPE) in collaborative mental health practice across the pre- to post-licensure continuum of medical education.
A systematic evaluation of IPE activities was conducted, utilizing a combination of evaluation study designs, including: pretest-posttest control group; one-group pre-test-post-test; and one-shot case study. Participant satisfaction, attitudes toward teamwork, and self-reported teamwork abilities were key evaluative outcome measures.
IPE in collaborative mental health practice was well received at both the pre- and post-licensure levels. Satisfaction scores were very high, and students, trainees, and practitioners welcomed the opportunity to learn about collaboration in the context of mental health. Medical student satisfaction increased significantly with the introduction of standardized patients (SPs) as an interprofessional learning method. Medical students and faculty reported that experiential learning in practice-based settings is a key component of effective approaches to IPE implementation. At a post-licensure level, practitioners reported significant improvement in attitudes toward interprofessional collaboration in mental health care after participation in IPE.
IPE in collaborative mental health is feasible, and mental health settings offer practical and useful learning experiences for students, trainees, and practitioners in interprofessional collaboration.
PubMed ID
22532196 View in PubMed
Less detail

An educational intervention to reduce the use of potentially inappropriate medications among older adults (EMPOWER study): protocol for a cluster randomized trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115389
Source
Trials. 2013;14:80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Philippe Martin
Robyn Tamblyn
Sara Ahmed
Cara Tannenbaum
Author Affiliation
Faculté de Pharmacie, InstitutUniversitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada.
Source
Trials. 2013;14:80
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Benzodiazepines - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Community Pharmacy Services
Drug Interactions
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Inappropriate Prescribing - prevention & control
Intention to Treat Analysis
Interdisciplinary Communication
Patient care team
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Safety
Physician-Patient Relations
Polypharmacy
Quebec
Research Design
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Self Efficacy
Time Factors
Abstract
Currently, far too many older adults consume inappropriate prescriptions, which increase the risk of adverse drug reactions and unnecessary hospitalizations. A health education program directly informing patients of prescription risks may promote inappropriate prescription discontinuation in chronic benzodiazepine users.
This is a cluster randomized controlled trial using a two-arm parallel-design. A total of 250 older chronic benzodiazepine users recruited from community pharmacies in the greater Montreal area will be studied with informed consent. A participating pharmacy with recruited participants represents a cluster, the unit of randomization. For every four pharmacies recruited, a simple 2:2 randomization is used to allocate clusters into intervention and control arms. Participants will be followed for 1 year. Within the intervention clusters, participants will receive a novel educational intervention detailing risks and safe alternatives to their current potentially inappropriate medication, while the control group will be wait-listed for the intervention for 6 months and receive usual care during that time period. The primary outcome is the rate of change in benzodiazepine use at 6 months. Secondary outcomes are changes in risk perception, self-efficacy for discontinuing benzodiazepines, and activation of patients initiating discussions with their physician or pharmacist about safer prescribing practices. An intention-to-treat analysis will be followed.The rate of change of benzodiazepine use will be compared between intervention and control groups at the individual level at the 6-month follow-up. Risk differences between the control and experimental groups will be calculated, and the robust variance estimator will be used to estimate the associated 95% confidence interval (CI). As a sensitivity analysis (and/or if any confounders are unbalanced between the groups), we will estimate the risk difference for the intervention via a marginal model estimated via generalized estimating equations with an exchangeable correlation structure.
Targeting consumers directly as catalysts for engaging physicians and pharmacists in collaborative discontinuation of benzodiazepine drugs is a novel approach to reduce inappropriate prescriptions. By directly empowering chronic users with knowledge about risks, we hope to imitate the success of individually targeted anti-smoking campaigns.
ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01148186.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23514019 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A new center for cooperation between veterinarians, physicians and ecologists].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142048
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Jun 2-8;107(22):1485-6
Publication Type
Article

474 records – page 1 of 48.