Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

21 records – page 1 of 3.

A cost effective approach to surgical antibiotic prophylaxis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223292
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1992 Aug;45(4):151-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1992
Author
M M Pavan
D L Malyuk
Author Affiliation
Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster, British Columbia.
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1992 Aug;45(4):151-6
Date
Aug-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appendectomy - adverse effects - economics
British Columbia
Cefazolin - economics - therapeutic use
Cefoxitin - economics - therapeutic use
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Drug Costs
Drug Therapy, Combination - economics - therapeutic use
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over
Humans
Interdepartmental Relations
Metronidazole - economics - therapeutic use
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - economics - statistics & numerical data
Premedication - economics
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Research Design
Surgical Wound Infection - economics - prevention & control
Abstract
Cefoxitin has been the prophylactic antibiotic of choice for appendectomy and colorectal surgery at this institution. Recent information suggests that cefazolin and metronidazole given as a single intravenous preparation could be a cost-effective alternative to cefoxitin or cefotetan for surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis of uncomplicated appendectomies. This study was conducted to determine the efficacy, toxicity, and cost of the current antibiotic regimens used for prophylaxis of uncomplicated appendectomies, to evaluate the efficacy, toxicity and cost of the cefazolin plus metronidazole combination in uncomplicated appendectomies, and to facilitate a cooperative working relationship between the Departments of Pharmacy and General Surgery. Although the numbers involved were small, this study suggests that the cefazolin/metronidazole combination is cost-effective. It is suggested that research is warranted in evaluating combinations such as this as cost-effective alternatives to current therapy.
PubMed ID
10123058 View in PubMed
Less detail

Creating cost-efficient initiatives in social work practice in the cardiac program of an acute care hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198338
Source
Health Soc Work. 2000 May;25(2):149-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
C. Kohm
D N Pollinger
F. Sheriff
Author Affiliation
University Health Network, Social Work Department, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. catherinekohm@uhn.on.ca
Source
Health Soc Work. 2000 May;25(2):149-52
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - psychology - rehabilitation
Cardiology Service, Hospital - economics - organization & administration
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Forms and Records Control
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Interdepartmental Relations
Ontario
Pamphlets
Patient Discharge
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Social Work Department, Hospital - economics - organization & administration
Abstract
All three cost-saving initiatives--the creation of a one-page application form to streamline the rehabilitation application process, the use of the resource specialist to assist with applications, and the development of an information package on cardiac rehabilitation--reflect a process whereby a creative idea, generating planning, activities, and follow-up resulted in a measurable effective change in practice. This process truly translated strategy into action (Kaplan, 1996) and is vital to the current rethinking in health care of how best to do our work (Coan, 1994). Because of this process, social workers in the cardiovascular surgical division of the cardiac program are better equipped to respond to the psychosocial needs of a growing cardiac population in a fiscally restrained environment.
PubMed ID
10845150 View in PubMed
Less detail

Decentralization of management responsibility: the case of Danish hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51193
Source
Int J Health Plann Manage. 1993 Oct-Dec;8(4):275-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Pallesen
L D Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Political Science, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Int J Health Plann Manage. 1993 Oct-Dec;8(4):275-94
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Budgets - statistics & numerical data - trends
Cost Savings - statistics & numerical data - trends
Decision Making, Organizational
Denmark
Efficiency, Organizational
Financial Management, Hospital - trends
Health Services Research
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data - trends
Hospital Departments - economics - trends
Hospital Restructuring - economics
Hospitals, County - economics - organization & administration
Institutional Management Teams
Interdepartmental Relations
Abstract
This article examines a specific management reform at three hospitals in a Danish county. Management reform at the hospital level implies a decentralization of responsibility and power to the departmental level. Along with increased responsibility and power, departments get the message: keep your budgets and keep your output level. This preliminary analysis indicates that departmental budgets can be a way of containing costs in clinical departments. Non-staff expenditures especially are subjected to reductions. The system still seems to 'favour' doctors and nurses, but less than in a system with traditional budgetary institutions. The behaviour of the top-management teams shows that the output constraint is not seriously meant. Departments are allowed to reduce capacity, with declining output, with the knowledge of the top-management team. The declining output makes it easier to departments ceteris paribus to keep within their budgets. And that makes it easier for the top-management team to keep the overall hospital budget. The obligation to keep the overall hospital budget is thus an important criterion of success in the eyes of the political masters of hospitals.
PubMed ID
10134931 View in PubMed
Less detail

Don't break the chain: importance of supply chain management in the operating room setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154444
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 2008 Sep;26(3):21-2, 30-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Candis Bilyk
Author Affiliation
Grey Nuns Community Hospital, Edmonton, AB.
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 2008 Sep;26(3):21-2, 30-4
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Central Supply, Hospital - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Cost Control
Efficiency, Organizational
Equipment and Supplies, Hospital - supply & distribution
Health services needs and demand
Hospital Distribution Systems - organization & administration
Humans
Interdepartmental Relations
Materials Management, Hospital - organization & administration
Operating Rooms - organization & administration
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - organization & administration
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Management of supplies within the operating room (OR) has considerable implications for decreasing healthcare costs while maintaining high-quality patient care. This area of healthcare therefore requires more monitoring by end-users including OR management, physicians, and nursing staff. This article is based on understanding supply chain management in the OR setting. Information provided throughout the article can be applied to small or large health care centers. It defines supply chain management and contains a brief overview of supply chain processes. It reviews the benefits of following these processes. The article also includes recommendations for improving the supply chain in the OR.
PubMed ID
18980068 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of a surgical pre-operative assessment clinic on patient care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222927
Source
Hosp Top. 1992;70(4):37-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
D D Persaud
U. Dawe
Author Affiliation
Calgary General Hospital, Alberta.
Source
Hosp Top. 1992;70(4):37-40
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Admitting Department, Hospital - organization & administration
Alberta - epidemiology
Efficiency
Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over
Hospitals, Teaching - organization & administration - utilization
Humans
Interdepartmental Relations
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Preoperative Care - methods
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Surgery Department, Hospital - organization & administration
Surgical Procedures, Operative - classification - psychology
Abstract
Surgery makes many demands of both hospitals and patients. For the hospital, there are many procedural aspects: admission, health assessment, and patient education; the actual operation; and the post-surgical recovery period, a time when patients are susceptible to complications and nosocomial infections. For the patient, surgery means physical pain and emotional anxiety. A pre-operative assessment clinic (POAC), however, can assist both hospital and patients by streamlining their admission, assessment, and education, by decreasing the time they spend in the hospital recovering from surgery, and by easing their anxiety. In this article, the authors describe a study of a POAC at a Canadian hospital.
PubMed ID
10171275 View in PubMed
Less detail

Establishment of a bone marrow transplant satellite pharmacy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221701
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1993 Feb;46(1):5-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
D M Woloschuk
D R Nazeravich
L J Gray
J M Larter
Author Affiliation
Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1993 Feb;46(1):5-11
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over
Hospital Units - organization & administration
Hospitals, Teaching - organization & administration
Humans
Interdepartmental Relations
Manitoba
Medication Systems, Hospital - organization & administration
Neoplasms - drug therapy
Oncology Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Patient care team
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Program Development - methods
Abstract
The planning, establishment and operation of a bone marrow transplant (B.M.T.) satellite pharmacy in a 1100-bed teaching hospital are described. The B.M.T. satellite pharmacy was established because of the specialized pharmaceutical care needs of this patient population with a high risk for drug-related problems. The satellite pharmacy, which is located within a 19-bed Oncology Unit, provides integrated clinical-distributive services (unit-dose, IV-admixture system) to all B.M.T. patients. The satellite is open 10.5 hours per day, seven days per week. Staff consists of three full-time equivalent (F.T.E.) staff pharmacists, a 0.5 F.T.E. technician, and one F.T.E. clinical pharmacist. Staff pharmacists rotate between provision of B.M.T. pharmacy services, and provision of pharmacy services for the provincial Home Parenteral Nutrition program. The pharmacists are responsible for all aspects of drug distribution and clinical services for B.M.T. patients. Additional drug distribution and clinical services are provided to other Oncology Unit patients. The establishment of a satellite pharmacy has provided unique opportunities for pharmaceutical care of the B.M.T. patient.
PubMed ID
10124614 View in PubMed
Less detail

A hospitalwide discharge planning program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103206
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1990 Feb;67(1):38-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1990
Author
M. Thliveris
Author Affiliation
Salvation Army Grace General Hospital, Winnipeg.
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1990 Feb;67(1):38-9
Date
Feb-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Interdepartmental Relations
Ontario
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Patient Discharge
Professional Staff Committees
Program Evaluation
Public Relations
PubMed ID
2311837 View in PubMed
Less detail

IRIS: an experimental multimedia workstation linking the departments of emergency medicine and radiological sciences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221490
Source
J Emerg Med. 1993 Mar-Apr;11(2):219-28
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Ahuja
M. Coristine
R D McKnight
W J Beilby
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, Ottawa Civic Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Emerg Med. 1993 Mar-Apr;11(2):219-28
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Communication Networks
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Equipment Design
Humans
Interdepartmental Relations
Ontario
Program Development
Radiology Department, Hospital - organization & administration
Radiology Information Systems
Abstract
An experimental version of a multimedia medical communication system called IRIS (Integrated Radiological Information System) operated between the Department of Emergency Medicine and the Department of Radiological Sciences at the Ottawa Civic Hospital for 7 weeks during April and May 1989. IRIS is being developed to enhance communication between clinicians and radiology consultants to improve diagnosis and reporting. IRIS supports the capture and distribution of digitized x-ray images and voice reports in the form of "electronic" patient folders that can be accessed at physician workstations throughout the hospital. It also supports on-line consultation between the radiologist and clinician through synchronized workstation operation. Each workstation has 1) a high resolution image screen to display documents and x-ray images; 2) a control screen to access patient folders; 3) a hands-free telephone to dictate, play back reports, and enable realtime consultation between physicians. From an emergency physician's (EP) perspective, such an involved system must allow the viewing and manipulation of images in order to reach diagnostic conclusions and support efficient interchange between the clinician and the consultant radiologist, yet be easy to learn and use without disruption of clinical services. After a briefing session, the trial took place and analogue and digital images were compared. An observer-assistant recorded how EPs used the system and was available to assist the EP. After the trial, six EPs participated in an extensive debriefing interview in order to evaluate the system. Overall, the system was found to be easy to learn and to use, and there was a clear benefit to the full consultation report and the ability to directly consult with the radiologist located at a remote station.
PubMed ID
8505528 View in PubMed
Less detail

21 records – page 1 of 3.