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The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic: the role of threat, coping, and media trust on vaccination intentions in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117388
Source
J Health Commun. 2013;18(3):278-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sheena Aislinn Taha
Kimberly Matheson
Hymie Anisman
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. sheena_taha@carleton.ca
Source
J Health Commun. 2013;18(3):278-90
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Intention
Male
Mass Media
Pandemics - prevention & control
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Trust
Vaccination - psychology
Abstract
Swine flu (H1N1) reached pandemic proportions in 2009, yet ambivalence was met concerning intentions to be vaccinated. The present investigation determined predictors of perceived H1N1 contraction risk and vaccination intentions among Canadian adults (N = 1,027) responding to an online questionnaire. The relatively low rate of vaccination intent (30.12%, and 34.99% being unsure of their intent) was related to a sense of invulnerability regarding illness contraction and symptom severity. Most individuals were skeptical that H1N1 would be widespread, believing that less than 10% of the population would contract H1N1. Yet, they also indicated that their attitudes would change once a single person they knew contracted the illness. Also, worry regarding H1N1 was related to self-contraction risk and odds of individuals seeking vaccination. Moreover, vaccination intent was related to the perception that the threat was not particularly great, mistrust of the media to provide accurate information regarding H1N1, and whether individuals endorsed problem-focused versus avoidant coping strategies. Given the role media plays in public perceptions related to a health crisis, trust in this outlet and credibility regarding the threat are necessary for adherence to recommended measures to minimize health risk.
PubMed ID
23301849 View in PubMed
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Addressing the turnover issue among new nurses from a generational viewpoint.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155071
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2008 Sep;16(6):724-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Mélanie Lavoie-Tremblay
Linda O'Brien-Pallas
Céline Gélinas
Nicole Desforges
Caroline Marchionni
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McGill University, QC, Canada. melanie.lavoie-tremblay@mcgill.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2008 Sep;16(6):724-33
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Humans
Intention
Intergenerational Relations
Job Satisfaction
Male
Nurse Administrators - organization & administration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Professional Autonomy
Quebec
Questionnaires
Social Support
Workplace - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
To investigate the relationship between dimensions of the psychosocial work environment and the intent to quit among a new generation of nurses.
As a new generation of nurses enters the workforce, we know little about their perception of their current work environment and its impact on their intent to stay.
A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 1002 nurses.
The nurses who intended to quit their positions perceived a significant effort/reward imbalance as well as a lack of social support. The nurses who intended to quit the profession perceived a significant effort/reward imbalance, high psychological demands and elevated job strain.
The balance between the level of effort expended and reward received plays an important role in young nurses' intent to leave.
Nurse Managers must offer Nexters, from the beginning of their career, a meaningful work and supportive environment. Without the efforts of the organization to improve the work environment and support nurses, this generation may not feel valued and move to another organization that will support them or another career that will offer fulfilment.
PubMed ID
18808467 View in PubMed
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Affective and cognitive attitudes, uncertainty avoidance and intention to obtain genetic testing: an extension of the Theory of Planned Behaviour.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136743
Source
Psychol Health. 2011 Sep;26(9):1143-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Katharina Wolff
Karin Nordin
Wibecke Brun
Gunilla Berglund
Gerd Kvale
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Christiesgate 12, Bergen, Norway. katharina.wolff@psysp.uib.no
Source
Psychol Health. 2011 Sep;26(9):1143-55
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Attitude to Health
Awareness
Culture
Defense Mechanisms
Female
Genetic Diseases, Inborn - genetics - mortality - psychology
Genetic Testing
Humans
Intention
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Norway
Penetrance
Psychological Theory
Questionnaires
Survival
Uncertainty
Abstract
To ensure successful implementation of genetic screening and counselling according to patients best interests, the attitudes and motives of the public are important to consider. The aim of this study was to apply a theoretical framework in order to investigate which individual and disease characteristics might facilitate the uptake of genetic testing. A questionnaire using an extended version of the Theory of Planned Behaviour was developed to assess the predictive value of affective and cognitive expected outcomes, subjective norms, perceived control and uncertainty avoidance on the intention to undergo genetic testing. In addition to these individual characteristics, the predictive power of two disease characteristics was investigated by systematically varying the diseases fatality and penetrance (i.e. the probability of getting ill in case one is a mutation carrier). This resulted in four versions of the questionnaire which was mailed to a random sample of 2400 Norwegians. Results showed genetic test interest to be quite high, and to vary depending on the characteristics of the disease, with participants preferring tests for highly penetrant diseases. The most important individual predictor was uncertainty avoidance.
PubMed ID
21347976 View in PubMed
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Age differences in goals: implications for health promotion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150663
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2009 May;13(3):336-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Xin Zhang
Helene Fung
Bob Ho-hong Ching
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2009 May;13(3):336-48
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Canada
Choice Behavior
Female
Goals
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Intention
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Pamphlets
Persuasive Communication
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Socioemotional selectivity theory postulates that, as people age, they prioritize emotionally meaningful goals. This study investigated whether these age differences in goals are reflected in how younger (aged 18-36, n = 111) and older adults (aged 62-86, n = 104) evaluated, remembered information from and were persuaded by health messages.
Participants were randomly assigned to read health pamphlets with identical factual information but emphasizing emotional or non-emotional goals.
Findings showed that health messages that emphasized emotional goals, but not those that emphasized future-oriented or neutral goals, were better remembered, were evaluated more positively and led to greater behavioral changes among older adults, but not younger adults.
These findings suggest that health messages targeting older adults may be more effective if they are framed in ways that emphasize love and caring.
PubMed ID
19484597 View in PubMed
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Alcohol assessment and feedback by email for university students: main findings from a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107016
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2013 Nov;203(5):334-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Jim McCambridge
Marcus Bendtsen
Nadine Karlsson
Ian R White
Per Nilsen
Preben Bendtsen
Author Affiliation
Jim McCambridge, PhD, Faculty of Public Health & Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK; Marcus Bendtsen, MSc, Department of Medicine and Health, and Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Nadine Karlsson, PhD, Department of Medicine and Health, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Ian R. White, PhD, MRC, Biostatistics Unit, Institute of Public Health, Cambridge, UK; Per Nilsen, PhD, Preben Bendtsen, PhD, Department of Medicine and Health, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2013 Nov;203(5):334-40
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control - psychology
Binge Drinking - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Electronic Mail
Feedback, Psychological
Female
Humans
Intention to Treat Analysis
Internet
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Universities
Young Adult
Abstract
Brief interventions can be efficacious in changing alcohol consumption and increasingly take advantage of the internet to reach high-risk populations such as students.
To evaluate the effectiveness of a brief online intervention, controlling for the possible effects of the research process.
A three-arm parallel groups design was used to explore the magnitude of the feedback and assessment component effects. The three groups were: alcohol assessment and feedback (group 1); alcohol assessment only without feedback (group 2); and no contact, and thus neither assessment nor feedback (group 3). Outcomes were evaluated after 3 months via an invitation to participate in a brief cross-sectional lifestyle survey. The study was undertaken in two universities randomising the email addresses of all 14 910 students (the AMADEUS-1 study, trial registration: ISRCTN28328154).
Overall, 52% (n = 7809) of students completed follow-up, with small differences in attrition between the three groups. For each of the two primary outcomes, there was one statistically significant difference between groups, with group 1 having 3.7% fewer risky drinkers at follow-up than group 3 (P = 0.006) and group 2 scoring 0.16 points lower than group 3 on the three alcohol consumption questions from the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT-C) (P = 0.039).
This study provides some evidence of population-level benefit attained through intervening with individual students.
PubMed ID
24072758 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use among reserve-dwelling adult First Nation members: use, problems, and intention to change drinking behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266062
Source
Addict Behav. 2015 Feb;41:232-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Nichea S Spillane
Brenna Greenfield
Kamilla Venner
Christopher W Kahler
Source
Addict Behav. 2015 Feb;41:232-7
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Culture
Drinking Behavior
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Intention
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Although alcohol use was not part of traditional First Nation (FN) life, alcohol misuse currently poses a significant public health problem. There is a dearth of research efforts to understand both alcohol misuse and efforts to resolve these problems. The primary aims of this study were to 1) present descriptive data on alcohol use in FN adults living on one reserve in Eastern Canada; and 2) explore correlates of help seeking intentions and past behaviors.
We administered questionnaires to 211 FN people (96 men; 113 women; 2 unknown).
Nearly two-thirds of our sample were current drinkers (N=150). Of those, 29% endorsed they needed help with their drinking, and half reported that they would probably try to cut down or stop drinking in the next year. Multiple regression analyses suggested that drinking was positively associated with a greater perceived need for help with drinking (ß=.40, p=
Notes
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PubMed ID
25452070 View in PubMed
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An adaptation of the theory of interpersonal behaviour to the study of telemedicine adoption by physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183487
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2003 Sep;71(2-3):103-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Marie-Pierre Gagnon
Gaston Godin
Camille Gagné
Jean-Paul Fortin
Lise Lamothe
Daniel Reinharz
Alain Cloutier
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, Pavillon de l'Est 2180, Chemin Ste-Foy, QC, G1K 7P4 Quebec, Canada. marie-pierre.gagnon@ext.msp.ulaval.ca
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2003 Sep;71(2-3):103-15
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Diffusion of Innovation
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Intention
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Physicians - psychology
Psychometrics
Quebec
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Telemedicine - utilization
Abstract
Physicians' acceptance of telemedicine constitutes a prerequisite for its diffusion on a national scale. Based upon the Theory of Interpersonal Behavior, this study was aimed at assessing the predictors of physicians' intention to use telemedicine in their clinical practice. All of the physicians involved in the RQTE, the extended provincial telemedicine network of Quebec (Canada) were mailed a questionnaire to identify the psychosocial determinants of their intention to adopt telemedicine. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was performed to assess the measurement model and structural equation modelling (SEM) was applied to test the theoretical model. The adapted theoretical model explained 81% (P
PubMed ID
14519403 View in PubMed
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Analytic versus systemic group therapy for women with a history of child sexual abuse: 1-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259757
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2014 Jun;87(2):191-208
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Henriette Elkjaer
Ellids Kristensen
Erik L Mortensen
Stig Poulsen
Marianne Lau
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2014 Jun;87(2):191-208
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology
Denmark
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Group Processes
Humans
Intention to Treat Analysis
Interpersonal Relations
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Abstract
This randomized prospective study examines durability of improvement in general symptomatology, psychosocial functioning and interpersonal problems, and compares the long-term efficacy of analytic and systemic group psychotherapy in women 1 year after completion of treatment for childhood sexual abuse.
Women (n = 106) randomly assigned to analytic or systemic psychotherapy completed the Symptom Checklist-90-R, Global Assessment of Functioning, Global Life Quality, Registration Chart Questionnaire, and Flashback Registration at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and at a 1-year follow-up.
Post-treatment gains were significant for both treatment modalities on all measures, but significantly larger after systemic therapy. Significant treatment response was maintained 1-year post-treatment, but different trajectories were observed: 1 year after treatment completion, improvements for analytic therapy were maintained, whereas they decreased after systemic therapy, resulting in no statistically significant difference in gains between the groups at the 1-year follow-up. Despite maintaining significant gains, more than half of the patients remained above cut-off for caseness concerning general symptomatology at post-treatment and at 1-year follow-up.
The findings stress the importance of long-term follow-up data in effect studies. Different trajectories were associated with the two treatments, but improvement in the two treatment groups did not differ significantly at the 1-year follow-up. Implications of the difference in trajectories for treatment planning are discussed.
Both analytic and systemic group therapy proved efficient in improving general symptomatology, psychosocial functioning, and interpersonal problems in women with a history of CSA and gains were maintained at a 1-year follow-up. Despite maintaining statistically significant gains at the 1-year follow-up, 54% of the patients remained above the cut-off for caseness with respect to general symptomatology, which may indicate a need for further treatment. Different pre-post follow-up treatment trajectories were observed between the two treatment modalities. Thus, while systemic group therapy showed a significantly better outcome immediately after termination, gains in the systemic treatment group decreased during follow-up, while gains were maintained during follow-up in analytic group therapy.
PubMed ID
24014477 View in PubMed
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Analyzing theoretical mechanisms of physical activity behavior change in breast cancer survivors: results from the activity promotion (ACTION) trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158234
Source
Ann Behav Med. 2008 Apr;35(2):150-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Jeffrey K H Vallance
Kerry S Courneya
Ronald C Plotnikoff
John R Mackey
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, E-488 Van Vliet Centre, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G-2H9.
Source
Ann Behav Med. 2008 Apr;35(2):150-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Behavior Therapy
Body Composition
Breast Neoplasms - pathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Combined Modality Therapy
Culture
Exercise - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Intention
Middle Aged
Motivation
Neoplasm Staging
Pamphlets
Patient Education as Topic
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
We previously reported that a physical activity (PA) behavior change intervention based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) increased PA and quality of life in breast cancer survivors.
To examine the effects of our interventions on TPB variables and to determine if PA at 12 weeks follow-up was mediated by TPB variables at 4 weeks.
Breast cancer survivors (N = 377) were randomly assigned to receive either a standard public health recommendation for PA (SR group), a step pedometer alone, or one of two TPB-based behavior change interventions consisting of print materials (alone or combined with a step pedometer). For the purpose of this study, we compared the two TPB-based intervention groups (INT group) to the SR group.
Compared to the SR group, the INT group reported more favorable changes in instrumental attitude (mean difference = 0.13; 95% CI = -0.01 to 0.23; d = 0.19; p = 0.077), intention (mean difference = 0.33; 95% CI = 0.10 to 0.56; d = 0.33; p = 0.006), and planning (mean difference = 0.39; 95% CI = 0.04 to 0.73; d = 0.26; p = 0.027). Mediation analyses indicated that both planning and intention partially mediated the effects of the intervention on PA at 12 weeks.
Our TPB-based behavior change intervention resulted in small improvements in the TPB constructs that partially mediated the effects of our intervention on PA behavior. Additional research with the TPB is warranted.
PubMed ID
18347895 View in PubMed
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An educational intervention to reduce the use of potentially inappropriate medications among older adults (EMPOWER study): protocol for a cluster randomized trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115389
Source
Trials. 2013;14:80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Philippe Martin
Robyn Tamblyn
Sara Ahmed
Cara Tannenbaum
Author Affiliation
Faculté de Pharmacie, InstitutUniversitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada.
Source
Trials. 2013;14:80
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Benzodiazepines - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Community Pharmacy Services
Drug Interactions
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Inappropriate Prescribing - prevention & control
Intention to Treat Analysis
Interdisciplinary Communication
Patient care team
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Safety
Physician-Patient Relations
Polypharmacy
Quebec
Research Design
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Self Efficacy
Time Factors
Abstract
Currently, far too many older adults consume inappropriate prescriptions, which increase the risk of adverse drug reactions and unnecessary hospitalizations. A health education program directly informing patients of prescription risks may promote inappropriate prescription discontinuation in chronic benzodiazepine users.
This is a cluster randomized controlled trial using a two-arm parallel-design. A total of 250 older chronic benzodiazepine users recruited from community pharmacies in the greater Montreal area will be studied with informed consent. A participating pharmacy with recruited participants represents a cluster, the unit of randomization. For every four pharmacies recruited, a simple 2:2 randomization is used to allocate clusters into intervention and control arms. Participants will be followed for 1 year. Within the intervention clusters, participants will receive a novel educational intervention detailing risks and safe alternatives to their current potentially inappropriate medication, while the control group will be wait-listed for the intervention for 6 months and receive usual care during that time period. The primary outcome is the rate of change in benzodiazepine use at 6 months. Secondary outcomes are changes in risk perception, self-efficacy for discontinuing benzodiazepines, and activation of patients initiating discussions with their physician or pharmacist about safer prescribing practices. An intention-to-treat analysis will be followed.The rate of change of benzodiazepine use will be compared between intervention and control groups at the individual level at the 6-month follow-up. Risk differences between the control and experimental groups will be calculated, and the robust variance estimator will be used to estimate the associated 95% confidence interval (CI). As a sensitivity analysis (and/or if any confounders are unbalanced between the groups), we will estimate the risk difference for the intervention via a marginal model estimated via generalized estimating equations with an exchangeable correlation structure.
Targeting consumers directly as catalysts for engaging physicians and pharmacists in collaborative discontinuation of benzodiazepine drugs is a novel approach to reduce inappropriate prescriptions. By directly empowering chronic users with knowledge about risks, we hope to imitate the success of individually targeted anti-smoking campaigns.
ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01148186.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23514019 View in PubMed
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323 records – page 1 of 33.