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[Burn treated at the Haukeland University Hospital Burn Centre--20 years of experience]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93174
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2008 May 15;128(10):1168-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2008
Author
Onarheim Henning
Guttormsen Anne Berit
Eriksen Einar
Author Affiliation
Kirurgisk serviceklinikk, Haukeland Universitetssykehus, 5021 Bergen. henning.onarheim@helse-bergen.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2008 May 15;128(10):1168-71
Date
May-15-2008
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Burns - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Burns, Chemical - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Burns, Electric - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Hospital Mortality
Hospitals, University - history
Humans
Infant
Intensive Care Units - history
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Survival Analysis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Burn Centre at Haukeland University Hospital has had a national burn function since 1984. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The following data were reviewed: area injured, age, sex, length of stay, mortality and county of residence for all admissions in the period 1984-2004. RESULTS: 1294 acute admissions for burns, chemical injuries or high-voltage injuries were identified. 71% of the patients were male. The mean age was 29.6 years; 24% were below 3 years of age. The mean (SD) area of injury was 19.5 +/- 18.3 % of the body surface area. 458 patients (35%) had burns involving less than 10% of the body surface area. The mean length of hospitalisation was 19.5 +/- 19.8 days. 140 patients (10.8%) died before discharge; these had a significantly higher age and injured area than the 1154 survivors. Every year there were 2-3 patients who had such extensive burns or substantial comorbidity that they only received palliative treatment. The probability of survival after a burn affecting 60% of the body surface, was around 50 % for all ages combined. On average 1.17 patients per 100.000 inhabitants were transferred annually from other parts of Norway for specialized treatment at this burn centre. INTERPRETATION: Despite societal focus on burn prevention measures there has been no reduction in the number of patients transferred to the burn centre during the 20-year period.
PubMed ID
18480865 View in PubMed
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Fifty years of infection control and healthcare design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119381
Source
Healthc Pap. 2012;12(3):40-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Michael Gardam
Patti Cochrane
Author Affiliation
Infection Prevention and Control, University Health Network.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2012;12(3):40-5
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
History, 20th Century
Hospital Administration - history
Hospital Design and Construction - history
Humans
Infection Control - history
Intensive Care Units - history
Abstract
The examination of 1962 perspectives on healthcare provided by Ross Graham and Shannon Sibbald in their article "Looking Back 50 Years in Hospital Administration" provides an opportunity to see not only what happened 50 years ago, but how modern attitudes and concerns both match and differ from those of the past. Focusing on infection prevention and hospital design, this commentary explores the changes in procedure, policy and attitudes since 1962, and how they are affecting healthcare today.
PubMed ID
23107905 View in PubMed
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[From surgeon assistant to independent specialist. The role of anesthesiologists and intensive care physicians in emergency medicine of the 20th century].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179035
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Jun 10;101(24):2091-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-10-2004

[From the poliomyelitis epidemic to the founding of artificial respiration centres, intensive care units and centres for home mechanical ventilation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170251
Source
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2006 Feb 25;150(8):444-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-25-2006
Author
A F Meinesz
P J Wijkstra
J G Zijlstra
M J I J Albers
G H Köter
Author Affiliation
Universitair Medisch Centrum Groningen, afd Longziekten/Centrum voor Thuisbeademing, Groningen.
Source
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2006 Feb 25;150(8):444-9
Date
Feb-25-2006
Language
Dutch
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Disease Outbreaks - history
History, 20th Century
Home Care Services - history
Humans
Intensive Care - history
Intensive Care Units - history
Netherlands
Poliomyelitis - complications - epidemiology - history
Respiration, Artificial - history
Abstract
In 1952, Copenhagen was confronted with a poliomyelitis epidemic that involved the respiratory musculature in large numbers of patients. The anaesthetist B. Ibsen, who established carbon dioxide intoxication due to severe hypoventilation as the cause of death, proposed that the patients be treated by tracheostomy and positive pressure respiration in order to achieve better ventilation than with an iron lung. In the Netherlands, it was decided to organise the control ofthe epidemics on a nationwide basis. Various hospitals were asked to set up artificial respiration centres. In addition, the Beatrix Fund was set up in order to collect money for combating poliomyelitis. The epidemic reached the Netherlands in 1956. In Groningen University Medical Centre, 74 patients were admitted, of whom 36 had to be ventilated. In two cases, the mechanical ventilation could not be stopped and one of these was ultimately discharged home with chronic ventilation in 1960, thus becoming the first patient in the Netherlands to be given mechanical ventilation at home. The mechanical ventilation centres developed into the intensive care units as we know them today. Most of the forms of treatment now in use are based on the techniques thought up and elaborated by the pioneers working in the mechanical ventilation centres. The latest development in this series is the development of centres for home mechanical ventilation.
PubMed ID
16538846 View in PubMed
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Further commentary on Denmark's 1952-53 poliomyelitis epidemic, especially regarding mortality; with a correction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177765
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2004 Nov;48(10):1310-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
R V Trubuhovich
Author Affiliation
Department of Critical Care Medicine, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. rvt.met@pl.net
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2004 Nov;48(10):1310-5
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology - history
Denmark - epidemiology
History, 20th Century
Humans
Intensive Care - history
Intensive Care Units - history
Poliomyelitis - history - mortality - therapy
Respiration, Artificial
Abstract
Berthelsen and Cronqvist recently published an article in Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica including aspects which could lead on to further discussion about the Danish 1952-53 poliomyelitis epidemic. This paper considers how Bjørn Ibsen's initial approach to treatment during the epidemic was successful, as well as how it could have failed; the roles played by ventilatory failure vs. gross neurologic destruction in causing deaths; and compilations from publications of statistics concerning mortality of the epidemic. The Blegdam Hospital concept of 'life-threatening poliomyelitis' is revisited, along with its division into six anatomico-clinical categories for the 345 patients so classified. Attention is drawn to the severity of assorted cerebral lesions demonstrated in 114 of the 115 autopsies conducted from the 144 fatal cases. Despite an overall mortality rate of 41.6% among the entire epidemic's sickest patients, a lowest mortality rate of 11% in the last 18 of such patients is identified. Note is made of the difficulty in reconciling various sources for certain features -- for which the 1956 book on the epidemic, edited by H.C.A. Lassen, has been freely used. Some folklore about aspects of management is mentioned. In the light of other recent research by Dr Berthelsen an essential correction is needed in dating 'Bjørn Ibsen's Day', amending 26 August 1952 to the 27th.
Notes
Comment On: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2003 Nov;47(10):1190-514616314
PubMed ID
15504194 View in PubMed
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History of anaesthesia: Datex. A Finnish success story in anaesthesia monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260467
Source
Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2014 Jul;31(7):351-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Feb 19;169(8):675-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-19-2007
Author
Preben G Berthelsen
Author Affiliation
Holstebro Sygehus, Anaestesiologisk Afdeling. p.g.berthelsen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Feb 19;169(8):675-7
Date
Feb-19-2007
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology - education - history
Denmark
Disease Outbreaks - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Intensive Care - history - trends
Intensive Care Units - history - trends
Poliomyelitis - history - mortality - therapy
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The first multidisciplinary intensive care unit in the world was established at the Copenhagen Municipal Hospital in December 1953. The man behind the concept was the Danish anesthesiologist Bjørn Ibsen (born: 1915). The paper outlines the conditions that made it possible for Ibsen to establish a unit where all categories of severely-ill patients were monitored and treated around the clock along the lines used in the operating theatres. The history of the technological and scientific evolution of intensive care therapy is briefly summarised. It is concluded that despite the increased sophistication of intensive care therapy, it often meets with failure because it is started too late. The development of an early warning system is urgently needed.
PubMed ID
17313910 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1970 Nov 26;132(48):2317-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-26-1970
Author
B. Ibsen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1970 Nov 26;132(48):2317-20
Date
Nov-26-1970
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
History, 20th Century
Humans
Intensive Care Units - history
Postoperative Care
Ventilators, Mechanical
PubMed ID
4922528 View in PubMed
Less detail

Intensive therapy: background and development. 1966.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202827
Source
Int Anesthesiol Clin. 1999;37(1):1-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
B. Ibsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesiology, Kommunehospitalet, Copenhagen.
Source
Int Anesthesiol Clin. 1999;37(1):1-14
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
History, 20th Century
Humans
Intensive Care - history
Intensive Care Units - history
PubMed ID
10086280 View in PubMed
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.