Skip header and navigation

Refine By

1862 records – page 1 of 187.

8th Annual Toronto Critical Care Medicine Symposium, 30 October-1 November 2003, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181450
Source
Crit Care. 2004 Feb;8(1):58-66
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Jeff Granton
John Granton
Author Affiliation
Programme Director, Critical Care Medicine Programme, University of Toronto, Canada. john.Granton@uhn.on.ca
Source
Crit Care. 2004 Feb;8(1):58-66
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects - utilization
Critical Care
Cross Infection - epidemiology
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Ontario - epidemiology
Respiration, Artificial
Sepsis - therapy
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - epidemiology
Terminal Care
Notes
Cites: J Immunol. 2000 Sep 15;165(6):2950-410975801
Cites: Crit Care Med. 1994 Oct;22(10):1568-787924367
Cites: J Palliat Care. 2000 Oct;16 Suppl:S45-5211075533
Cites: Anaesthesia. 2001 Feb;56(2):124-911167472
Cites: Intensive Care Med. 2001 Feb;27(2):355-6211396279
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Aug 1;164(3):396-40211500339
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2001 Oct;39(10):3727-3211574603
Cites: Neurology. 2002 Jan 8;58(1):20-511781400
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2002 Jan 15;165(2):165-7011790648
Cites: Anesthesiology. 2002 Apr;96(4):795-80211964585
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Jul 20;360(9328):219-2312133657
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2002 Sep;123(3):790-80212198705
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2002 Sep 17;99(19):12351-612209006
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Sep 25;288(12):1499-50712243637
Cites: Intensive Care Med. 2003 Jan;29(1):55-6112528023
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2003 Feb 15;167(4):521-712493644
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2003 Feb 20;348(8):683-9312594312
Cites: Intensive Care Med. 2003 Mar;29(3):481-312560869
Cites: CMAJ. 2003 Apr 15;168(8):993-512695383
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Apr 16;289(15):1941-912697796
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Apr 16;289(15):1950-612697797
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Mar 1;273(9):703-87853627
Cites: Shock. 1994 Apr;1(4):246-537735958
Cites: Chest. 1995 Sep;108(3):767-717656631
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1996 May 30;334(22):1417-218618579
Cites: J Appl Physiol (1985). 1995 Dec;79(6):1878-828847247
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1996 Jul;154(1):57-628680699
Cites: Intensive Care Med. 1996 May;22(5):387-948796388
Cites: Crit Care Med. 1997 Mar;25(3):435-99118659
Cites: Lancet. 1997 Jul 26;350(9073):251-59242802
Cites: Crit Care Med. 1998 Jan;26(1):44-99428542
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Feb;157(2):371-69476845
Cites: Chest. 1998 Feb;113(2):412-209498961
Cites: Intensive Care Med. 1998 Feb;24(2):172-79539077
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Jun;157(6 Pt 1):1721-59620897
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Jan 13;281(2):163-89917120
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1999 Mar;159(3):872-8010051265
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1999 Apr;159(4 Pt 1):1249-5610194173
Cites: Chest. 1999 Apr;115(4):1076-8410208211
Cites: Science. 1999 Jul 9;285(5425):248-5110398600
Cites: Crit Care Med. 1999 Jul;27(7):1230-5110446814
Cites: Nat Med. 1999 Dec;5(12):1433-610581089
Cites: Intensive Care Med. 1999 Nov;25(11):1297-30110654217
Cites: Crit Care Med. 2000 May;28(5):1269-7510834664
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2000 Jul;162(1):27-3310903215
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2000 Jul;162(1):119-2510903230
Cites: Crit Care Med. 2000 Aug;28(8):2737-4110966244
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2003 May 29;348(22):2196-20312773646
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2003 Jun 15;167(12):1633-4012663325
Cites: Intensive Care Med. 2003 Jun;29(6):870-512739014
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Jun 14;361(9374):2068-7712814731
Cites: Br J Anaesth. 2003 Jul;91(1):61-7212821566
Cites: Chest. 2003 Jul;124(1):392-712853551
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Jul 16;290(3):367-7312865378
Cites: Surgery. 2003 Aug;134(2):180-812947316
Cites: Pediatrics. 2003 Sep;112(3 Pt 1):553-812949283
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2003 Sep 18;349(12):1123-3213679526
Cites: Am J Clin Pathol. 1989 Jun;91(6):701-32729182
Cites: Intensive Care Med. 1990;16(6):372-72246418
Cites: Crit Care Med. 1993 Jul;21(7):1012-98319458
Cites: Am J Crit Care. 1992 Jul;1(1):85-901307883
Cites: J Palliat Care. 2000 Oct;16 Suppl:S31-911075531
PubMed ID
14975048 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Abnormal coagulation in critical care patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177817
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(14):1745-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004

Abnormal vital signs are strong predictors for intensive care unit admission and in-hospital mortality in adults triaged in the emergency department - a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125355
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:28
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Charlotte Barfod
Marlene Mauson Pankoke Lauritzen
Jakob Klim Danker
György Sölétormos
Jakob Lundager Forberg
Peter Anthony Berlac
Freddy Lippert
Lars Hyldborg Lundstrøm
Kristian Antonsen
Kai Henrik Wiborg Lange
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Hillerød Hospital, Denmark. cbar@hih.regionh.dk
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:28
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Triage - methods - statistics & numerical data
Vital Signs
Young Adult
Abstract
Assessment and treatment of the acutely ill patient have improved by introducing systematic assessment and accelerated protocols for specific patient groups. Triage systems are widely used, but few studies have investigated the ability of the triage systems in predicting outcome in the unselected acute population. The aim of this study was to quantify the association between the main component of the Hillerød Acute Process Triage (HAPT) system and the outcome measures; Admission to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and in-hospital mortality, and to identify the vital signs, scored and categorized at admission, that are most strongly associated with the outcome measures.
The HAPT system is a minor modification of the Swedish Adaptive Process Triage (ADAPT) and ranks patients into five level colour-coded triage categories. Each patient is assigned a triage category for the two main descriptors; vital signs, T(vitals), and presenting complaint, T(complaint). The more urgent of the two determines the final triage category, T(final). We retrieved 6279 unique adult patients admitted through the Emergency Department (ED) from the Acute Admission Database. We performed regression analysis to evaluate the association between the covariates and the outcome measures.
The covariates, T(vitals), T(complaint) and T(final) were all significantly associated with ICU admission and in-hospital mortality, the odds increasing with the urgency of the triage category. The vital signs best predicting in-hospital mortality were saturation of peripheral oxygen (SpO(2)), respiratory rate (RR), systolic blood pressure (BP) and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS). Not only the type, but also the number of abnormal vital signs, were predictive for adverse outcome. The presenting complaints associated with the highest in-hospital mortality were 'dyspnoea' (11.5%) and 'altered level of consciousness' (10.6%). More than half of the patients had a T(complaint) more urgent than T(vitals), the opposite was true in just 6% of the patients.
The HAPT system is valid in terms of predicting in-hospital mortality and ICU admission in the adult acute population. Abnormal vital signs are strongly associated with adverse outcome, while including the presenting complaint in the triage model may result in over-triage.
Notes
Cites: J Intern Med. 2004 May;255(5):579-8715078500
Cites: Am J Emerg Med. 1987 Jul;5(4):278-823593492
Cites: Emerg Med Australas. 2005 Jun;17(3):212-715953221
Cites: CJEM. 2008 Mar;10(2):151-7318371253
Cites: Rev Esp Salud Publica. 2008 May-Jun;82(3):251-918711640
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:2922490233
Cites: Emerg Med J. 2010 Feb;27(2):86-9220156855
Cites: Resuscitation. 2010 Aug;81(8):932-720637974
Cites: J Emerg Med. 2011 Jun;40(6):623-818930373
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2011;19:4221718476
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 2011 Oct 3;173(40):2490-321975184
Cites: J Emerg Med. 2010 Jan;38(1):70-918514465
PubMed ID
22490208 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptable long-term outcome in elderly intensive care unit patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133259
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2011 Jul;58(7):A4297
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Morten A Schrøder
Jesper Brøndum Poulsen
Anders Perner
Author Affiliation
Intensive Care Unit, 4131, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 København Ø, Denmark. mortenschroder@gmail.com
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2011 Jul;58(7):A4297
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Confidence Intervals
Denmark
Female
Hospital Mortality - trends
Humans
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Registries
Statistics, nonparametric
Survivors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The number of elderly intensive care unit (ICU) patients is increasing. We therefore assessed the long-term outcome in the elderly following intensive care.
The outcome status for 91 elderly (=75 years) and 659 nonelderly (18-74 years) ICU patients treated in the course of a one year period was obtained. A total of 36 of 37 eligible elderly survivors were interviewed about their health related quality of life (HRQOL), social services and their wish for intensive care.
The mortality (54% at follow-up and 64% after one year) was higher in the elderly ICU patients than in non-elderly ICU patients (33% and 37%, respectively, p
PubMed ID
21722543 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to intensive neonatal care and neonatal survival in low birthweight infants: a population study in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60131
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1987 Apr;1(1):33-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1987
Author
J F Forbes
K E Larssen
L S Bakketeig
Author Affiliation
Social Paediatric and Obstetric Research Unit, University of Glasgow, Scotland.
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1987 Apr;1(1):33-42
Date
Apr-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - mortality
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Norway
Prenatal Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
This study evaluates the impact of regional differences in access to intensive neonatal care on neonatal survival in geographically defined populations of 4,692 low birthweight births in Norway 1979-81. For infants weighting 1,250 to 2,499 g our results are consistent with the existence of a dose-response association between neonatal survival and the level of immediate access to intensive neonatal care. Although not statistically significant, there was a clear gradient in the risk of mortality within 24 hours. A similar pattern of survival could not be consistently demonstrated for infants weighing less than 1,250 g.
PubMed ID
3506188 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accidental hypothermia: factors related to long-term hospitalization. A retrospective study from northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290758
Source
Intern Emerg Med. 2017 Dec; 12(8):1225-1233
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Jari Pirnes
Tero Ala-Kokko
Author Affiliation
Division of Intensive Care Medicine, and Medical Research Center Oulu, Department of Anaesthesiology, Oulu University Hospital and Research Group of Surgery, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Medical Faculty, University of Oulu, Box 21, OUH, 90029, Oulu, Finland. jari.pirnes@fimnet.fi.
Source
Intern Emerg Med. 2017 Dec; 12(8):1225-1233
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Acidosis, Lactic - etiology - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hypothermia - mortality
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Renal Insufficiency - complications - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Rhabdomyolysis - complications - mortality
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Accidental hypothermia has a low incidence, but is associated with a high mortality rate. Knowledge about concomitant factors, complications, and length of hospital stay is limited. A retrospective cohort study on patients with accidental hypothermia admitted to Oulu University Hospital in Finland, over a 5-year period. Patients were categorized as short-stay patients (7 days or less) and long-stay patients (more than 7 days) according to their length of stay in hospital. From a total of 105 patients, 67 patients were included in the analyses. Alcohol abuse was the most common concomitant factor (54 %). Median length of hospital stay was 4 days, and 16 patients (24 %) stayed in hospital over 7 days (median 15 days). Thirty-day mortality was low (14/105, 13 %). Patients with long-term hospitalization had a lower initial temperature (28.4 versus 31.2 °C, p = 0.011), a lower level of consciousness (GCS score 8.4 versus 12.8, p = 0.003), more severe acidosis (pH 7.08 versus 7.28, p = 0.005, and lactate 7.2 versus 3.9, p = 0.043), and a lower level of platelets (183 versus 242, p = 0.041) on admission compared with short-stay patients. Thirty-six patients (54 %) had at least one complication, and this prolonged median hospital treatment for 2.5 days (p 
Notes
Cites: Korean J Intern Med. 2014 Jan;29(1):111-5 PMID 24574841
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2015 Feb 06;23:13 PMID 25655922
Cites: Resuscitation. 2013 Apr;84(4):492-5 PMID 22986068
Cites: Int J Emerg Med. 2012 Feb 02;5(1):9 PMID 22300441
Cites: Am J Emerg Med. 2014 Apr;32(4):320-4 PMID 24468125
Cites: Resuscitation. 2014 Sep;85(9):1204-11 PMID 24882104
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2012 Nov 15;367(20):1930-8 PMID 23150960
Cites: Lancet. 1995 Feb 25;345(8948):493-8 PMID 7861878
Cites: Pediatr Emerg Care. 2012 May;28(5):475-80; quiz 481-2 PMID 22561323
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014 Jan 27;22:6 PMID 24460844
Cites: Resuscitation. 2015 Aug;93:118-23 PMID 26095302
Cites: Wien Klin Wochenschr. 2014 Jan;126(1-2):56-61 PMID 24249326
Cites: Resuscitation. 2015 Oct;95:148-201 PMID 26477412
Cites: Resuscitation. 2014 Jun;85(6):749-56 PMID 24513157
Cites: Resuscitation. 2012 Sep;83(9):1078-84 PMID 22634431
Cites: Resuscitation. 2010 Nov;81(11):1550-5 PMID 20702016
Cites: Resuscitation. 2003 Dec;59(3):285-90 PMID 14659598
Cites: Crit Care. 2012 Jul 31;16(4):R142 PMID 22849694
Cites: Intensive Care Med. 2000 Dec;26(12):1843-9 PMID 11271094
PubMed ID
27677616 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accounting for vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage in pandemic critical care triage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96997
Source
J Clin Ethics. 2010;21(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Chris Kaposy
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. christopher.kaposy@med.mun.ca
Source
J Clin Ethics. 2010;21(1):23-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Critical Care
Cultural Characteristics
Disaster Planning - trends
Disease Outbreaks
Health Care Rationing - ethics
Health Policy - trends
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - ethnology - mortality - virology
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration - standards
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Patient Selection - ethics
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Social Class
Triage - methods - organization & administration - standards - trends
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
In a pandemic situation, resources in intensive care units may be stretched to the breaking point, and critical care triage may become necessary. In such a situation, I argue that a patient's combined vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage should be a justification for giving that patient some priority for critical care. In this article I present an example of a critical care triage protocol that recognizes the moral relevance of vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage, from the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.
PubMed ID
20465071 View in PubMed
Less detail

The accuracy of administrative data for identifying the presence and timing of admission to intensive care units in a Canadian province.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127694
Source
Med Care. 2012 Mar;50(3):e1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Allan Garland
Marina Yogendran
Kendiss Olafson
Damon C Scales
Kari-Lynne McGowan
Randy Fransoo
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. agarland@hsc.mb.ca
Source
Med Care. 2012 Mar;50(3):e1-6
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Critical Care - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Databases, Factual - standards
Hospital Information Systems - organization & administration - standards
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Manitoba
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
A prerequisite for using administrative data to study the care of critically ill patients in intensive care units (ICUs) is that it accurately identifies such care. Only limited data exist on this subject.
To assess the accuracy of administrative data in the Canadian province of Manitoba for identifying the existence, number, and timing of admissions to adult ICUs.
For the period 1999 to 2008, we compared information about ICU care from Manitoba hospital abstracts, with the criterion standard of a clinical ICU database that includes all admissions to adult ICUs in its largest city of Winnipeg. Comparisons were made before and after a national change in administrative data requirements that mandated specific data elements identifying the existence and timing of ICU care.
In both time intervals, hospital abstracts were extremely accurate in identifying the presence of ICU care, with positive predictive values exceeding 98% and negative predictive values exceeding 99%. Administrative data correctly identified the number of separate ICU admissions for 93% of ICU-containing hospitalizations; inaccuracy increased with more ICU stays per hospitalization. Hospital abstracts were highly accurate for identifying the timing of ICU care, but only for hospitalizations containing a single ICU admission.
Under current national-reporting requirements, hospital administrative data in Canada can be used to accurately identify and quantify ICU care. The high accuracy of Manitoba administrative data under the previous reporting standards, which lacked standardized coding elements specific to ICU care, may not be generalizable to other Canadian jurisdictions.
PubMed ID
22270100 View in PubMed
Less detail

1862 records – page 1 of 187.