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Adolescent pregnancy outcomes in the province of Ontario: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115757
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Mar;35(3):234-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Nathalie Fleming
Natalia Ng
Christine Osborne
Shawna Biederman
Abdool Shafaaz Yasseen
Jessica Dy
Ruth Rennicks White
Mark Walker
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Newborn Care, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Mar;35(3):234-45
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analgesia, Epidural - statistics & numerical data
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Extraction, Obstetrical - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy in Adolescence - statistics & numerical data
Prenatal Care - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Smoking - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Few Canadian studies have examined the association between adolescent pregnancy and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The objective of this cohort study was to characterize the association between adolescent pregnancy and specific adverse maternal, obstetrical, and neonatal outcomes, as well as maternal health behaviours.
We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study of all singleton births in Ontario between January 2006 and December 2010, using the Better Outcomes Registry and Network database. Outcomes for pregnant women
PubMed ID
23470111 View in PubMed
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Cesarean deliveries: when is a pediatrician necessary?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3192
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1997 Feb;89(2):217-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
J. Jacob
J. Pfenninger
Author Affiliation
Alaska Neonatology Associates, P.C., Anchorage, USA.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1997 Feb;89(2):217-20
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anesthesia
Apgar score
Cesarean Section
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Pediatrics
Pregnancy
Resuscitation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the need for vigorous resuscitation (bag-and-mask ventilation, tracheal intubation, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation) in certain common cesarean deliveries at term to evaluate the need for pediatrician attendance on behalf of the fetus. METHODS: Records of singleton cesarean deliveries (repeat, nonprogressive labor, fetal malposition, fetal heart rate abnormality) at term over 2 years were reviewed for the following: need for vigorous resuscitation, Apgar scores, anesthesia used, and the need for newborn intensive care. The next consecutive, uncomplicated singleton vaginal delivery in each case was used to create a control group. Exclusion criteria included the presence of maternal disease (diabetes, pregnancy-induced hypertension, placenta previa) or suspicion of fetal abnormalities (growth restriction, congenital defect, known meconium staining of the amniotic fluid). There were 834 cesarean deliveries and 834 controls (low-risk vaginal deliveries). RESULTS: Compared with vaginal deliveries, Apgar scores of 6 or less at 1 minute were more frequent in all cesarean deliveries except for the repeat cesarean category. The incidence of needing vigorous resuscitation was as follows: vaginal 1.7%, repeat 3.0%, nonprogressive labor 4.8%, fetal malposition 11.2%, and fetal heart rate abnormality 17.7%. The use of regional anesthesia reduced the need for vigorous resuscitation in cesarean deliveries for the repeat group and the group with nonprogressive labor without fetal heart rate abnormalities to a level similar to that in uncomplicated vaginal deliveries (2.1% repeat; 1.6% nonprogressive labor without fetal heart rate abnormality). CONCLUSIONS: Both repeat cesarean deliveries and cesareans done for nonprogressive labor without signs of fetal heart rate abnormality, when performed under regional anesthesia, may not need a pediatrician in attendance because of minimal fetal risk.
PubMed ID
9015023 View in PubMed
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Decision-to-incision time and neonatal outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105053
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Mar;123(3):536-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Mary C Tolcher
Rebecca L Johnson
Sherif A El-Nashar
Colin P West
Author Affiliation
Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Anesthesiology, Medicine, and Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Mar;123(3):536-48
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apgar score
Canada
Cesarean Section - standards - statistics & numerical data
Emergencies
Europe
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Models, Statistical
Odds Ratio
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pregnancy
Time Factors
Umbilical Arteries
United States
Abstract
To systematically review the literature on the proportion of emergent cesarean deliveries accomplished within 30 minutes, the mean time from decision-to-incision or delivery, and differences in neonatal outcomes in deliveries accomplished within 30 minutes compared to beyond 30 minutes.
Electronic databases (Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE and www.clinicaltrials.gov) were searched from inception to January 2013.
Eligible studies reported decision-to-incision time or delivery time intervals for nonelective cesarean deliveries. Both emergent and urgent deliveries (also known as category 1 and category 2 deliveries) were included. Two reviewers independently identified studies for inclusion.
Out of 737 reports identified in the primary search, 34 studies (22,936 women) met eligibility criteria. Seventy-nine percent (95% confidence interval [CI] 61-97%) of category 1 deliveries and 36% (95% CI 24-48%) of category 2 deliveries were achieved within 30 minutes, with significantly shorter time in category 1 compared to category 2 deliveries (21.2 compared with 42.6 minutes; P
PubMed ID
24499762 View in PubMed
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Differences in preferences for neonatal outcomes among health care professionals, parents, and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201873
Source
JAMA. 1999 Jun 2;281(21):1991-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2-1999
Author
S. Saigal
B L Stoskopf
D. Feeny
W. Furlong
E. Burrows
P L Rosenbaum
L. Hoult
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University and Children's Hospital at Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation, Ontario, Canada. saigal@fhs.mcmaster.ca
Source
JAMA. 1999 Jun 2;281(21):1991-7
Date
Jun-2-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Canada
Control Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making
Health
Health Care Rationing
Health status
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - therapy
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Intensive Care, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Interviews as Topic
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology
Neonatal Nursing
Neonatology
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parents - psychology
Patient satisfaction
Quality of Life
Value of Life
Abstract
In neonatal intensive care, parents make important clinical management decisions in conjunction with health care professionals. Yet little information is available on whether preferences of health care professionals and parents for the resulting health outcomes differ.
To measure and compare preferences for selected health states from the perspectives of health care professionals (ie, neonatologists and neonatal nurses), parents of extremely low-birth-weight (ELBW) or normal birth-weight infants, and adolescents who were either ELBW or normal birth-weight infants.
Cross-sectional cohort study.
A total of 742 participants were recruited and interviewed between 1993 and 1995, including 100 neonatologists from hospitals throughout Canada; 103 neonatal nurses from 3 regional neonatal intensive care units; 264 adolescents (aged 12-16 years), including 140 who were ELBW infants and 124 sociodemographically matched term controls; and 275 parents of the recruited adolescents.
Preferences (utilities) for 4 to 5 hypothetical health states of children were obtained by direct interviews using the standard gamble method.
Overall, neonatologists and nurses had similar preferences for the 5 health states, and a similar proportion rated some health states as worse than death (59% of neonatologists and 68% of nurses; P=.20). Health care professionals rated the health states lower than did parents of ELBW and term infants (P
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 2000 Jun 28;283(24):3201-210866861
Comment In: JAMA. 1999 Jun 2;281(21):2041-310359394
PubMed ID
10359387 View in PubMed
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Hospital admissions for lower respiratory tract infections after early-, late-, and post-term birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307076
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2020 03; 34(2):139-149
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2020
Author
Paula Haataja
Päivi Korhonen
Riitta Ojala
Mikko Hirvonen
Matti Korppi
Mika Gissler
Tiina Luukkaala
Outi Tammela
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2020 03; 34(2):139-149
Date
03-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Bronchiolitis - epidemiology - therapy
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Postmature
Intensive Care, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Male
Pneumonia - epidemiology - therapy
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Term Birth
Abstract
Recent data suggest that early-term births are associated with later respiratory morbidity (LRTI), and post-term births may decrease this risk.
The objective was to determine the impact of early-term, late-term, and post-term birth on hospital admission for LRTI up to the age of seven years. Additionally, we explored maternal and perinatal factors associated with the risk of admission for LRTIs.
The association of early-term (37+0 -38+6  weeks), late-term (41+0 -41+6  weeks), and post-term (=42 weeks) birth with hospital admissions for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in comparison with infants born full-term (39+0 -40+6  weeks) was assessed and early predictors of LRTI were established. The register study included 948 695 infants born in Finland in 1991-2008. Data were analysed in four-term subgroups. Hospital admissions for bronchiolitis/bronchitis and pneumonia were collected up to 7 years of age. Adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess risk factors of LRTI admissions.
The rates of hospital admission in the early-, full-, late-, and post-term groups were 6.7%, 5.5%, 5.1%, and 4.8% for bronchiolitis/bronchitis, and 2.8%, 2.4%, 2.3%, and 2.3% for pneumonia. Early-term birth was associated with an increased risk of admission for bronchiolitis/bronchitis (hazard ratio HR 1.21, 95% confidence interval CI 1.18, 1.23) and pneumonia (HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.12, 1.20), while late-term (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.91, 0.95) and post-term births (HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.85, 0.93) were associated with a decreased risk of bronchiolitis/bronchitis admission compared with the full-term group. Maternal age = 20 years, smoking during pregnancy, male sex, caesarean delivery, small for gestational age, 1-minute Apgar score 
PubMed ID
32010990 View in PubMed
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The impact of increased number of low-risk deliveries on maternal and neonatal outcomes: A retrospective cohort study in Finland in 2011-2015.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294904
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2018 Apr; 223:30-34
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Elina Karalis
Anna-Maija Tapper
Mika Gissler
Veli-Matti Ulander
Author Affiliation
University of Helsinki, Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: elina.karalis@helsinki.fi.
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2018 Apr; 223:30-34
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Apgar score
Cohort Studies
Delivery, Obstetric - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitals, Maternity
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Labor, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Perineum - injuries
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Our aim was to demonstrate the influence of increased number of low-risk deliveries on obstetric and neonatal outcome.
The study hospital was Kätilöopisto Maternity Hospital in Helsinki. Simultaneously, we studied all three delivery units in the Helsinki region in the population-based analysis. The study population was singleton hospital deliveries occurring between 2011 and 2012, and 2014-2015. The study hospital included 11 237 and 15 637 births and the population-based group included 28 950 and 27 979 births. We compared outcome measures in different periods by calculating adjusted odds ratios (AOR). Main outcome measures were induced delivery, mode of delivery, third or fourth degree perineal tear, Apgar score at five minutes 7?days, and perinatal death.
In the study hospital, induction rate increased from 22.4% to 24.8% (AOR 1.06, 95% CI; 1.00-1.12) while in the population-based analysis the rate decreased from 22.2% to 21.5% (AOR 0.96, 95% CI; 0.92-1.00). Percentage of neonatal transfers, low Apgar scores, and severe perineal tears increased both in study hospital and in population-based group. Changes in operative delivery rate and other adverse perinatal outcomes were statistically insignificant.
Increasing the volume of a delivery unit does not compromise maternal or neonatal outcome. Specific characteristics of a delivery unit affect the volume outcome association.
PubMed ID
29455000 View in PubMed
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Inotropic Therapy in Newborns, A Population-Based National Registry Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286341
Source
Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2016 Oct;17(10):948-956
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Margrete Larsen Burns
Hans Jørgen Stensvold
Kari Risnes
Hans Jørgen Guthe
Henriette Astrup
S Marianne Nordhov
Terje Reidar Selberg
Arild Rønnestad
Astri Maria Lang
Source
Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2016 Oct;17(10):948-956
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiotonic Agents - therapeutic use
Critical Illness
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - drug therapy
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Intensive Care, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Norway
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Abstract
To describe the use of inotropic drugs and the characteristics of neonates receiving such treatment in a national cohort of patients admitted to neonatal ICUs in Norway.
A national registry study of patients included in the Norwegian Neonatal Network database 2009-2014. Demographic and treatment data, including the use of inotropic drugs (dopamine, dobutamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, milrinone, and levosimendan) and outcomes, were retrieved and analyzed.
Neonatal ICUs in Norway.
All patients admitted to Norwegian neonatal ICUs 2009-2014 with a postmenstrual age of less than 310 days at admission, corresponding to a postnatal age of less than 28 days for a child born at term (n = 36 397).
None.
Inotropic drugs were administered to 974 of 361,803 live born infants (0.27%) in the study period, representing 2.7% of the neonatal ICU patient population. The relative proportion of neonatal ICU patients receiving inotropes decreased with increasing gestational age, yet 41% of the patients receiving inotropes were born at term. Of note, 89.8% of treated patients received dopamine. Use of inotropes was particularly prevalent in patients with necrotizing enterocolitis (72.4%) and pulmonary hypertension (42.1%) and in patients with gestational age less than 28 weeks (28.2%). Inotropic treatment initiated in the first week of life (84.2%) was associated with birth asphyxia and pulmonary hypertension, whereas treatment initiated after the first week of life was associated with extremely preterm birth, neonatal surgery, neonatal sepsis, cardiac disease, and necrotizing enterocolitis.
This comprehensive epidemiologic study indicates that less than 0.3% of newborns receive inotropic support in the neonatal period. Dopamine was the most commonly used drug. Relating inotrope use to clinical condition, gestational age, and postnatal age may be useful for clinicians and helpful in delineating relevant patient populations for future clinical trials.
PubMed ID
27500723 View in PubMed
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Outcome in obstetric care related to oxytocin use. A population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80967
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2006;85(9):1094-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Oscarsson Maria E
Amer-Wåhlin Isis
Rydhstroem Hakan
Källén Karin
Author Affiliation
Centre for Reproductive Epidemiology (Tornblad's Institute), Lund University, Lund, Sweden. maria.oscarsson@bredband.net
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2006;85(9):1094-8
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acidosis - epidemiology
Adult
Apgar score
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Labor, Induced - methods - statistics & numerical data
Labor, Obstetric - drug effects
Maternal Age
Odds Ratio
Oxytocics - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Oxytocin - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate the delivery outcome in relation to oxytocin use in labor. METHODS: We studied 106,755 deliveries from 1995 to 2002 in the Perinatal Revision South, a population-based register comprising information from 10 hospitals in southern Sweden. RESULTS: Oxytocin use in labor increased from 27.6% in 1995/96 to 33.2% in 2001/02 (p12 h, there was a significant association between oxytocin use and Apgar score
PubMed ID
16929414 View in PubMed
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Outcomes of late-preterm infants: a retrospective, single-center, Canadian study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149693
Source
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2009 Oct;48(8):844-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Ratchada Kitsommart
Marianne Janes
Vikas Mahajan
Asad Rahman
Wendy Seidlitz
Jennifer Wilson
Bosco Paes
Author Affiliation
Neonatology Division, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2009 Oct;48(8):844-50
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Birth weight
Comorbidity
Drug Utilization
Female
Gestational Age
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Premature, Diseases - epidemiology - therapy
Intensive Care, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Pneumothorax - epidemiology
Respiration, Artificial - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
To study the prevalence of major morbidities and mortality of inborn, late-preterm infants. Methods. A retrospective review was conducted from 2004 to 2008. Descriptive outcomes were compared with predefined aggregate outcomes of term infants during the same period.
Data on 1193 late-preterm and 8666 term infants were compared. Majority of late-preterm infants were 36 weeks (43.6%), followed by 35 weeks (29.2%) and 34 weeks (27.2%), respectively. The prevalence of intensive care admission, respiratory support, pneumothorax, and mortality in late preterm infants was significantly higher compared with term infants. Mechanical ventilation and continuous positive airway pressure rates substantially decreased with increased gestational age. Although only 1.0% had positive cultures, 28.5% received parenteral antibiotics. The late-preterm group had a 12-fold higher risk of death with an overall mortality rate of 0.8%.
This study confirmed the high-risk status of late-preterm infants with worse mortality and morbidities compared with term infants.
PubMed ID
19596865 View in PubMed
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Perinatal outcomes following an earlier post-term labour induction policy: a historical cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267929
Source
BJOG. 2015 Sep;122(10):1377-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
M. Hedegaard
Ø. Lidegaard
C W Skovlund
L S Mørch
Source
BJOG. 2015 Sep;122(10):1377-85
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Infant, Postmature
Intensive Care, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Labor, Induced - methods
Logistic Models
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pregnancy
Registries
Abstract
To assess the changes in perinatal outcomes in children born from 37 weeks of gestation after implementation of a more proactive labour induction practice from 2009.
Register-based cohort study.
Denmark, 2000-12.
Newborns from 37 weeks of gestation.
Perinatal outcomes were estimated using a logistic regression analysis with adjustment for gestational age, maternal age, parity, plurality, smoking and body mass index.
Perinatal outcomes.
A total of 770 926 infants were included. Labour induction from 37 weeks increased from 9.7% in 2000-02 to 22.5% in 2011-12. From 2003-05 to 2011-12, the risk of umbilical cord pH
PubMed ID
25690911 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.