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2454 records – page 1 of 246.

5-year morbidity among very preterm infants in relation to level of hospital care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119186
Source
JAMA Pediatr. 2013 Jan;167(1):40-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Liisi Rautava
Janne Eskelinen
Unto Häkkinen
Liisa Lehtonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Turku University Hospital, 20520 Turku, Finland. liisi.rautava@utu.fi
Source
JAMA Pediatr. 2013 Jan;167(1):40-6
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Premature, Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Intensive Care, Neonatal
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient transfer
Registries
Secondary Care
Tertiary Care Centers
Tertiary Healthcare
Abstract
To determine whether birth and care in the highest-level hospitals (level III) compared with birth in or postnatal transfer to lower-level hospitals (level II) are associated with 5-year morbidity in very preterm children.
A cohort study.
Finland.
All surviving 5-year-old children born very preterm (gestational age
PubMed ID
23128961 View in PubMed
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8th Annual Toronto Critical Care Medicine Symposium, 30 October-1 November 2003, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181450
Source
Crit Care. 2004 Feb;8(1):58-66
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Jeff Granton
John Granton
Author Affiliation
Programme Director, Critical Care Medicine Programme, University of Toronto, Canada. john.Granton@uhn.on.ca
Source
Crit Care. 2004 Feb;8(1):58-66
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects - utilization
Critical Care
Cross Infection - epidemiology
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Ontario - epidemiology
Respiration, Artificial
Sepsis - therapy
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - epidemiology
Terminal Care
Notes
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PubMed ID
14975048 View in PubMed
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19th century pioneers of intensive therapy in North America. Part 1: George Edward Fell.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160003
Source
Crit Care Resusc. 2007 Dec;9(4):377-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Ronald V Trubuhovich
Author Affiliation
Department of Critical Care Medicine, Auckland Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. rvt.met@pl.net
Source
Crit Care Resusc. 2007 Dec;9(4):377-93
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aphorisms and Proverbs as Topic
Canada
History, 19th Century
Humans
Intensive Care - history
Intermittent Positive-Pressure Ventilation - history
Respiration, Artificial - history - instrumentation
Resuscitation - history
Tracheotomy - history
Abstract
For three decades after Marshall Hall's 1856 strictures against "forcing methods" and bellows for artificial ventilation (AV), human "forced respiration" (equivalent to intermittent positive pressure ventilation) was virtually abandoned. Various arm-chest manoeuvres often proved inadequate to save life. After doctor and engineer George Fell, of Buffalo (New York) (1849-1918), failed to save the life of an opiate-poisoned patient using Silvester's popular method, he resolved to try his animal laboratory AV method (bellows and tracheotomy). Following his first success in a landmark case (1887), he better adapted the apparatus for human use and soon succeeded with further difficult cases, but was unable to raise enthusiasm for his "Fell method" of AV. His reports of successful rescues to prestigious Washington Congresses met derision (1887) and indifference (1893), although by then they detailed 28 "human lives saved", mostly after opiate poisoning, and a switch from tracheotomies to face masks (simpler, but with a few complications). Continuing with rescues throughout the 1890s, Fell personally achieved recoveries after AV for as long as 73.5 hours (1896), and over 78 hours (1899). He argued for his method repeatedly with many talks, much documentation, and pleas for its use in other ventilatory crises. Despite his endeavours and successes, Fell was unable to secure widespread uptake of forced respiration, but others adopted his principles. Joseph O'Dwyer modified Fell's face mask-tracheotomy system by incorporating an intralaryngeal tube, and this "Fell-O'Dwyer apparatus" was used for neurosurgical cases (1894), also revolutionising intrathoracic surgery (1899).
PubMed ID
18052905 View in PubMed
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[20 years emergency surgery of abdominal organs in Moscow].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104248
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2014;(5):7-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
A S Ermolov
A N Smoliar
I A Shliakhovskii
M G Khramenkov
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2014;(5):7-16
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen, Acute - classification - epidemiology - surgery
Anniversaries and Special Events
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intensive Care - methods - organization & administration
Moscow - epidemiology
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Quality Improvement - statistics & numerical data - trends
Surgery Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The analysis of emergency surgical care in medical institution of Moscow for the last 20 years is presented in the article. There were 912 156 patients with acute appendicitis, strangulated hernia, perforated gastro-duodenal ulcer, gastro-duodenal bleeding, acute cholecystitis, acute pancreatitis, acute intestinal obstruction on treatment during this period. It was observed reduction overall and postoperative mortality. It was concluded that positive results are caused by development of material and technical base, transition on clock mode of diagnostic units, increase of patients? number hospitalized in department of intensive care for operation training and after it, using of modern diagnostic and therapeutic methods, edit documents regulating of health facilities activity according to medicine development.
PubMed ID
24874218 View in PubMed
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The 26th Congress: a successful event north of the Arctic Circle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192331
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2001 Nov;45(10):1285-9
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Nov-2001
Author
L J Bjertnaes
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2001 Nov;45(10):1285-9
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Anesthesiology
Emergency Medicine
Humans
Intensive Care
Scandinavia
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
11736684 View in PubMed
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The 26th Congress of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Tromso, Norway, 13-17 June 2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193633
Source
Crit Care. 2001 Aug;5(4):204-6
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Aug-2001
Source
Crit Care. 2001 Aug;5(4):204-6
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Anesthesiology
Humans
Intensive Care
Pain - drug therapy
Scandinavia
Sepsis - drug therapy
Societies, Medical
Abstract
The 26th Congress of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine took place in the state-of-the art Tromso University Hospital. There were over 500 participants, and approximately 300 oral and poster presentations highlighted the latest progress in diverse areas. Much interest focused on activated protein C (APC) and other ways forward in sepsis treatment, pain management, novel markers of neurotrauma and antioxidants in bypass surgery. The meeting continues to be the leading anaesthesiology and intensive care conference in the region.
PubMed ID
11511333 View in PubMed
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[47-percent 6-months-long survival for intensive care patients over 80].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198302
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Apr 26;97(17):2066-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-2000
Author
N. Lindqvist
O. Lindqvist
Author Affiliation
Universitetssjukhuset i Lund. ninnilindqvist@iname.com
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Apr 26;97(17):2066-70
Date
Apr-26-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ethics, Medical
Female
Humans
Intensive Care - economics
Length of Stay
Male
Quality of Life
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Survivors - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
All 112 patients aged 80 and above treated at the intensive care unit at the University Hospital in Lund, Sweden 1994-1995 were followed-up retrospectively in terms of six-month survival (SMS) and for survivors in terms of quality of life. Overall SMS was the same for both men and women--47%. Patients with the poorest SMS were those aged 90 and above with only one patient out of eleven surviving six months. Patients admitted for severe heart failure also showed a very poor outcome with SMS 27%. Patients were grouped in terms of living conditions prior to admission to the ICU, and a significant difference in six-month survival was noted between those living in their own homes (53%) prior to admission compared to those coming from a nursing home (25%). Patients surviving six months were interviewed by telephone regarding their living situation in March 1997. More than 50% of survivors were living in their own homes with external help no more than once a day. The average APACHE II score was 14.9 +/- 8.2. The average score for patients surviving six months was 13.4 +/- 5.9 and for those not surviving six months 16.8 +/- 5.1. No significant statistical difference in APACHE II scores between these two groups was shown.
PubMed ID
10850034 View in PubMed
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[Abnormal coagulation in critical care patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177817
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(14):1745-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004

Abnormal vital signs are strong predictors for intensive care unit admission and in-hospital mortality in adults triaged in the emergency department - a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125355
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:28
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Charlotte Barfod
Marlene Mauson Pankoke Lauritzen
Jakob Klim Danker
György Sölétormos
Jakob Lundager Forberg
Peter Anthony Berlac
Freddy Lippert
Lars Hyldborg Lundstrøm
Kristian Antonsen
Kai Henrik Wiborg Lange
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Hillerød Hospital, Denmark. cbar@hih.regionh.dk
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:28
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Triage - methods - statistics & numerical data
Vital Signs
Young Adult
Abstract
Assessment and treatment of the acutely ill patient have improved by introducing systematic assessment and accelerated protocols for specific patient groups. Triage systems are widely used, but few studies have investigated the ability of the triage systems in predicting outcome in the unselected acute population. The aim of this study was to quantify the association between the main component of the Hillerød Acute Process Triage (HAPT) system and the outcome measures; Admission to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and in-hospital mortality, and to identify the vital signs, scored and categorized at admission, that are most strongly associated with the outcome measures.
The HAPT system is a minor modification of the Swedish Adaptive Process Triage (ADAPT) and ranks patients into five level colour-coded triage categories. Each patient is assigned a triage category for the two main descriptors; vital signs, T(vitals), and presenting complaint, T(complaint). The more urgent of the two determines the final triage category, T(final). We retrieved 6279 unique adult patients admitted through the Emergency Department (ED) from the Acute Admission Database. We performed regression analysis to evaluate the association between the covariates and the outcome measures.
The covariates, T(vitals), T(complaint) and T(final) were all significantly associated with ICU admission and in-hospital mortality, the odds increasing with the urgency of the triage category. The vital signs best predicting in-hospital mortality were saturation of peripheral oxygen (SpO(2)), respiratory rate (RR), systolic blood pressure (BP) and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS). Not only the type, but also the number of abnormal vital signs, were predictive for adverse outcome. The presenting complaints associated with the highest in-hospital mortality were 'dyspnoea' (11.5%) and 'altered level of consciousness' (10.6%). More than half of the patients had a T(complaint) more urgent than T(vitals), the opposite was true in just 6% of the patients.
The HAPT system is valid in terms of predicting in-hospital mortality and ICU admission in the adult acute population. Abnormal vital signs are strongly associated with adverse outcome, while including the presenting complaint in the triage model may result in over-triage.
Notes
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Cites: J Emerg Med. 2010 Jan;38(1):70-918514465
PubMed ID
22490208 View in PubMed
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[About the problem of opportune admission of patients with cerebral aneurysms to specialized neurosurgical department of N.N. Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150479
Source
Zh Vopr Neirokhir Im N N Burdenko. 2009 Jan-Mar;(1):29-32; discussion 32-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
O B Belousova
D N Okishev
Source
Zh Vopr Neirokhir Im N N Burdenko. 2009 Jan-Mar;(1):29-32; discussion 32-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Hospital Departments
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intensive Care - standards
Intracranial Aneurysm - complications - diagnosis - surgery
Male
Moscow
Neurosurgery
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - diagnosis - etiology - surgery
Time Factors
Abstract
The problem of emergent transportation and early surgical care of patients with aneurysmal SAH is well recognized due of high risk of fatal rebleeding. Currently, this problem is resolved in most of developed countries. The purpose of the study was to analyze causes of late admission of patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysms to highly specialized clinics such as Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute. The work is based on data of 101 patients with cerebral aneurysms admitted in 2007 within time period exceeding one month after SAH. 14% of patients were submitted from Moscow and near-by regions, 86% -- from far-off regions of the country. 29.7% had the history of recurrent bleedings. Primary admission to the local hospital in 65% of patients was on Day 0 and in 80% -- within the first week after SAH. Leading causes of the delay of primary admission were underestimation of the severity of patient's status by ambulance staff (52.5%) and delayed applying for medical help by patient (42.5%). After admission, in most cases treatment was conservative regardless of patients' condition. The median time of aneurysm diagnosis was 1.6 months and the median time to admission to Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute -- 3.7 months. The need for better organization of emergent care in cases of SAH is obvious. Possible decisions lay in establishing training programs for physicians; making neurosurgical care more accessible, developing neurovascular units in regional hospitals and easy-quoted federal financing coverage.
PubMed ID
19507311 View in PubMed
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2454 records – page 1 of 246.