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Administrative data algorithms can describe ambulatory physician utilization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162665
Source
Health Serv Res. 2007 Aug;42(4):1783-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Baiju R Shah
Janet E Hux
Andreas Laupacis
Bernard Zinman
Karen Cauch-Dudek
Gillian L Booth
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, G106-2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M4N 3M5.
Source
Health Serv Res. 2007 Aug;42(4):1783-96
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Ambulatory Care - utilization
Diabetes Mellitus - therapy
Female
Health Services Research
Humans
Insurance Claim Review
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Physicians - utilization
ROC Curve
Abstract
To validate algorithms using administrative data that characterize ambulatory physician care for patients with a chronic disease.
Seven-hundred and eighty-one people with diabetes were recruited mostly from community pharmacies to complete a written questionnaire about their physician utilization in 2002. These data were linked with administrative databases detailing health service utilization.
An administrative data algorithm was defined that identified whether or not patients received specialist care, and it was tested for agreement with self-report. Other algorithms, which assigned each patient to a primary care and specialist physician, were tested for concordance with self-reported regular providers of care.
The algorithm to identify whether participants received specialist care had 80.4 percent agreement with questionnaire responses (kappa=0.59). Compared with self-report, administrative data had a sensitivity of 68.9 percent and specificity 88.3 percent for identifying specialist care. The best administrative data algorithm to assign each participant's regular primary care and specialist providers was concordant with self-report in 82.6 and 78.2 percent of cases, respectively.
Administrative data algorithms can accurately match self-reported ambulatory physician utilization.
Notes
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Cites: Diabetes Care. 2001 Nov;24(11):1936-4011679460
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2002 Mar;25(3):512-611874939
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2002 Jun;37(3):751-7412132604
Cites: Health Care Financ Rev. 1995 Summer;16(4):189-9910151888
PubMed ID
17610448 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adults' use of health services in the year before death by suicide in Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129450
Source
Health Rep. 2011 Sep;22(3):15-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Kenneth B Morrison
Lory Laing
Author Affiliation
Alberta Children and Youth Services, Edmonton, Alberta, T5K 2N2. ken.morrison@gov.ab.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2011 Sep;22(3):15-22
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alberta - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Insurance Claim Review - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - complications - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The suicide rate in Alberta is consistently above the Canadian average. Health care use profiles of those who die by suicide in Alberta are currently unknown.
Death records were selected for people aged 25 to 64 with suicide coded as the underlying cause of death from April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2006. The death records were linked to administrative records pertaining to physician visits, emergency department visits, inpatient hospital separations, and community mental health visits. The control group was the Alberta population aged 25 to 64 who did not die by suicide. Frequency estimates were produced to determine the characteristics of the study population. Odds ratios relating to demographics, exposure to health care services, and case-control status were estimated with logistic regression.
Almost 90% of suicides had a health service in the year before their death. Suicides averaged 16.6 visits per person, compared with 7.7 visits for non-suicides. Much of the health service use among people who died by suicide appears to have been driven by mental disorders.
Information about health service delivery to those who die by suicide can guide prevention and intervention efforts.
PubMed ID
22106785 View in PubMed
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Adverse events in spine surgery in Sweden: a comparison of patient claims data and national quality register (Swespine) data .

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129817
Source
Acta Orthop. 2011 Dec;82(6):727-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Annica Ohrn
Anders Olai
Hans Rutberg
Per Nilsen
Hans Tropp
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden. annica.ohrn@lio.se
Source
Acta Orthop. 2011 Dec;82(6):727-31
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disability Evaluation
Dura Mater - injuries
Female
Humans
Insurance Claim Review
Male
Orthopedic Procedures - adverse effects - methods - standards
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prosthesis Failure
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Registries
Reoperation
Spinal Diseases - surgery
Spinal Nerves - injuries
Spine - surgery
Surgical Wound Infection - etiology
Sweden
Abstract
Our knowledge of complications and adverse events in spinal surgery is limited, especially concerning incidence and consequences. We therefore investigated adverse events in spine surgery in Sweden by comparing patient claims data from the County Councils' Mutual Insurance Company register with data from the National Swedish Spine Register (Swespine).
We analyzed patient claims (n = 182) to the insurance company after spine surgery performed between 2003 and 2005. The medical records of the patients filing these claims were reviewed and compared with Swespine data for the same period.
Two-thirds (119/182, 65%) of patients who claimed economic compensation from the insurance company were registered in Swespine. Of the 210 complications associated with these 182 claims, only 74 were listed in Swespine. The most common causes of compensated injuries (n = 139) were dural lesions (n = 40) and wound infections (n = 30). Clinical outcome based on global assessment, leg pain, disability, and quality of health was worse for patients who claimed economic compensation than for the total group of Swespine patients.
We found considerable under-reporting of complications in Swespine. Dural lesions and infections were not well recorded, although they were important reasons for problems and contributed to high levels of disability. By analyzing data from more than one source, we obtained a better understanding of the patterns of adverse events and outcomes after spine surgery.
Notes
Cites: Lakartidningen. 2006 Feb 22-28;103(8):534-6, 53916570778
Cites: Eur Spine J. 2010 Mar;19(3):439-4220013002
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Cites: BMJ. 2000 Mar 18;320(7237):759-6310720361
Cites: Can J Surg. 2000 Apr;43(2):113-710812345
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2001 Jan 1;26(1):115-7; discussion 11811148655
Cites: Acta Orthop Scand. 2001 Apr;72(2):99-10611372956
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1989 Jan;14(1):56-92913669
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1993 Sep 1;119(5):370-68338290
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1998 Dec;80(12):1728-329875930
Cites: Acta Orthop Suppl. 2005 Oct;76(319):1-2416234179
Cites: Postgrad Med J. 2009 Feb;85(1000):69-7319329700
Cites: Value Health. 2008 Sep-Oct;11(5):927-3218489521
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 2009 Aug;21(4):285-9119556405
Cites: Eur Spine J. 2009 Aug;18 Suppl 3:294-30419495812
Cites: BMJ. 2007 Jan 13;334(7584):7917175566
PubMed ID
22066564 View in PubMed
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[Almost thousand patients with nosocomial hepatitis C compensated ex gratia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78246
Source
Lakartidningen. 2007 Feb 28-Mar 6;104(9):666-9
Publication Type
Article

[Also "whiplash-related disorders" require evidence-based knowledge].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192353
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 31;98(44):4892-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-31-2001
Author
L. Holm
J. Beertema
Author Affiliation
Lena.Holm@trygghansa.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 31;98(44):4892-5
Date
Oct-31-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Insurance Claim Review
Prognosis
Sweden
Whiplash Injuries - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2004 Jun 24;101(26-27):229515281641
PubMed ID
11729804 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Amalgam as dental filling. Health insurance authorities allow compensations for mercury poisoning based on weak indications]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73585
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Sep 11;88(37):2995-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-11-1991
Author
A K Furhoff
J. Håkansson
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Sep 11;88(37):2995-7
Date
Sep-11-1991
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Insurance Claim Review
Insurance, Health
Male
Mercury Poisoning - diagnosis - economics - etiology
Middle Aged
Sweden
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 1991 Oct 30;88(44):36541943380
PubMed ID
1921586 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of 700 orthopedic complaints reported to the Norwegian Patient Compensation System]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31829
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Oct 30;121(26):3050-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-2001
Author
I. Bjerkreim
H. Steen
Author Affiliation
Oslo ortopediske universitetsklinikk Trondheimsveien 132 0570 Oslo. ingjald.bjerkreim@rikshospitalet.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Oct 30;121(26):3050-2
Date
Oct-30-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child, Preschool
Diagnostic Errors - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Insurance Claim Review
Male
Malpractice - statistics & numerical data
Medical Errors - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Orthopedics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Surgical Wound Infection - diagnosis - epidemiology
Trauma, Nervous System
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In the 1993-99 period, the NPCS reached decisions on 4,041 orthopaedic injury cases. This paper reviews the complaints lodged. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We have analysed data from 700 randomly selected cases in order to elucidate the reasons for complaint. RESULTS: Complaints were lodged against all types of hospitals and primary health care providers. The most frequent primary diagnosis were osteoarthritis of the hip, lumbar disc herniation, and various fractures. Complaints were most commonly related to faulty treatment, continued pain, nerve injuries, reduced function, mistaken diagnosis, malposition of bone or joint, and infection. 84% of complaints were related to treatment and to operative treatment in particular. In 209 cases (30%), the complaints were heard. Of these 209, 43% were heard because of the treatment given, 21% because of infection, 18% because of diagnostic fault, and 6% because of defective follow-up. 491 complaints were rejected; in 70% of them because the injury was acceptable according to general rules, in 19% because the basic disorder had caused the injury, and in 7% because there was in fact no injury. INTERPRETATION: In our opinion, better knowledge about treatment injury cases represents valuable information that contributes to a higher quality of care.
PubMed ID
11757438 View in PubMed
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Analysis of deaths among children in the period 1996-2008 from closed claims registered by the Danish Patient Insurance Association.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123085
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2012 Oct;101(10):1074-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Lars Dahlgaard Hove
Johannes Bock
Jens Krogh Christoffersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia, Hvidovre Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. ldhove@hotmail.com
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2012 Oct;101(10):1074-8
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cause of Death
Child
Child Mortality
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Equipment Failure - economics - statistics & numerical data
Female
Financing, Government - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Insurance Claim Review
Insurance, Liability - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medical Errors - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
We investigated the death circumstances among children in the Danish healthcare system by analysing closed claims.
This retrospective study investigated closed claims with regard to medically related deaths registered by the Danish Patient Insurance Association.
From 1996 to 2008, 45 953 claims were made to the Danish Patient Insurance Association (DPIA) covering all medical specialties. Among these claims, a total of 3531 submitted claims were for children younger than 18 years old, and 74 of these children were registered as having died. Forty-one of the 74 deaths were caused by peripartum asphyxia or other birth-related reasons, and 33 children died of causes not related to their birth. Twenty-three of the 33 children died as a result of substandard treatment. This was the ruling of the DPIA or the courts of law on the claim. In these cases, the DPIA, the appeal board or the courts of law settled that an experienced specialist would have acted differently such that the injury could have been avoided.
Twenty-three of the 33 deaths after the perinatal period could potentially have been avoided if experienced specialists had handled the cases.
PubMed ID
22734625 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of mortality patterns and workers' compensation awards among asbestos insulation workers in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231845
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(5):523-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Health Studies Service, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(5):523-8
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestosis - etiology - mortality
Humans
Insurance Claim Review
Male
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Ontario
Workers' Compensation
Abstract
Mortality and workers' compensation patterns were studied among 1,064 Ontario asbestos insulation workers. A proportional mortality analysis of 153 asbestos worker deaths found increased mortality from malignant diseases (65 deaths observed; 35.1 expected), cancers of the lungs and pleura (32 deaths observed; 11.5 expected), peritoneal mesothelioma (4 deaths), and respiratory diseases (14 deaths observed; 7.9 expected). Despite the publicity given to asbestos-associated diseases, dependents of many men potentially eligible for workers compensation awards have not received pensions because claims were not filed. These findings suggest that much occupationally related disease is not being recognized in Ontario.
PubMed ID
2531545 View in PubMed
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219 records – page 1 of 22.