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Direct healthcare costs for 5 years post-fracture in Canada: a long-term population-based assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117014
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2013 May;24(5):1697-705
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
W D Leslie
L M Lix
G S Finlayson
C J Metge
S N Morin
S R Majumdar
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine (C5121), University of Manitoba, 409 Tache Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. bleslie@sbgh.mb.ca
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2013 May;24(5):1697-705
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Hip Fractures - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Humeral Fractures - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Insurance, Health, Reimbursement - statistics & numerical data
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Osteoporotic Fractures - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Spinal Fractures - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Time Factors
Wrist Injuries - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
High direct incremental healthcare costs post-fracture are seen in the first year, but total costs from a third-party healthcare payer perspective eventually fall below pre-fracture levels. We attribute this to higher mortality among fracture cases who are already the heaviest users of healthcare ("healthy survivor bias"). Economic analyses that do not account for the possibility of a long-term reduction in direct healthcare costs in the post-fracture population may systematically overestimate the total economic burden of fracture.
High healthcare costs in the first 1-2 years after an osteoporotic fracture are well recognized, but long-term costs are uncertain. We evaluated incremental costs of non-traumatic fractures up to 5 years from a third-party healthcare payer perspective.
A total of 16,198 incident fracture cases and 48,594 matched non-fracture controls were identified in the province of Manitoba, Canada (1997-2002). We calculated the difference in median direct healthcare costs for the year pre-fracture and 5 years post-fracture expressed in 2009 Canadian dollars with adjustment for expected age-related healthcare cost increases.
Incremental median costs for a hip fracture were highest in the first year ($25,306 in women, $21,396 in men), remaining above pre-fracture baseline to 5 years in women but falling below pre-fracture costs by 5 years in men. In those who survived 5 years following a hip fracture, incremental costs remained above pre-fracture costs at 5 years ($12,670 in women, $7,933 in men). Incremental costs were consistently increased for 5 years after spine fracture in women. Total incremental healthcare costs for all incident fractures combined showed a large increase over pre-fracture costs in the first year ($137 million in women, $57 million in men), but fell below pre-fracture costs within 3-4 years. Elevated total healthcare costs were seen at year 5 in women after wrist, humerus and spine fractures, but these were somewhat offset by decreases in total healthcare costs for other fractures.
High direct healthcare costs post-fracture are seen in the first year, but total costs eventually fall below pre-fracture levels. Among those who survive 5 years following a fracture, healthcare costs remain above pre-fracture levels.
Notes
Erratum In: Osteoporos Int. 2013 Nov;24(11):2901
PubMed ID
23340947 View in PubMed
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Features of physician services databases in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120027
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2012 Sep;32(4):186-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
L M Lix
R. Walker
H. Quan
R. Nesdole
J. Yang
G. Chen
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. lisa.lix@usask.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2012 Sep;32(4):186-93
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection - standards
Databases, Factual - standards
Health Information Systems - standards
Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Insurance, Health, Reimbursement - statistics & numerical data
International Classification of Diseases - statistics & numerical data
Management Information Systems - standards
Medical Record Linkage
Physicians - economics - statistics & numerical data
Remuneration
Specialization - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Physician services databases (PSDs) are a valuable resource for research and surveillance in Canada. However, because the provinces and territories collect and maintain separate databases, data elements are not standardized. This study compared major features of PSDs.
The primary source was a survey of key informants that collected information about years of data, patient/provider characteristics, database inclusions/exclusions, coding of diagnoses, procedures and service locations. Data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information's (CIHI) National Physician Database were used to examine physician remuneration methods, which may affect PSD completeness. Survey data were obtained for nine provinces and two territories.
Most databases contained post-1990 records. Diagnoses were frequently recorded using ICD-9 codes. Other coding systems differed across jurisdictions and time, although all PSDs identified in-hospital services and distinguished family medicine from other specialties. Capture of non-fee-for-service records varied and CIHI data revealed an increasing proportion of non-fee-for-service physicians over time.
Further research is needed to investigate the potential effects of PSD differences on comparability of findings from pan-Canadian studies.
PubMed ID
23046800 View in PubMed
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