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The association between IGF-I and insulin resistance: a general population study in Danish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126601
Source
Diabetes Care. 2012 Apr;35(4):768-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Nele Friedrich
Betina Thuesen
Torben Jørgensen
Anders Juul
Christin Spielhagen
Henri Wallaschofksi
Allan Linneberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. nele.friedrich@uni-greifswald.de
Source
Diabetes Care. 2012 Apr;35(4):768-73
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Osmolar Concentration
Population
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
IGF-I has an almost 50% amino acid sequence homology with insulin and elicits nearly the same hypoglycemic response. Studies showed that low and high IGF-I levels are related to impaired glucose tolerance and to a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the association between IGF-I level and insulin resistance in a Danish general population.
Included were 3,354 adults, aged 19-72 years, from the cross-sectional Health2006 study. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used as the index to estimate insulin resistance. Serum IGF-I levels were determined by an immunoassay and grouped into quintiles (Q1-Q5). Linear or multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed.
In the study population, 520 subjects (15.5%) had increased HOMA-IR values above 2.5. After adjustment for age, sex, physical activity, and waist-to-height ratio, a U-shaped association between IGF-I and HOMA-IR was found. Low IGF-I (Q1: odds ratio [OR] 1.65 [95% CI 1.16-2.34], P
Notes
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PubMed ID
22374641 View in PubMed
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Birth weight is the most important predictor of abnormal retinal vascularisation in moderately preterm infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259710
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2014 Jun;103(6):594-600
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
K. Allvin
A. Hellström
J. Dahlgren
M. Andersson Grönlund
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2014 Jun;103(6):594-600
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Weight - physiology
Female
Fetal Blood
Fundus Oculi
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Small for Gestational Age - blood - physiology
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Pre-Eclampsia
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Pregnancy in Diabetics
Retinal Neovascularization - blood - etiology - pathology
Retinal Vessels - pathology
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
To find predictors of abnormal retinal vascularisation in moderately to late preterm newborn infants considered to have no risk of developing retinopathy of prematurity.
Seventy-eight infants (34 girls) were recruited from a longitudinal study of otherwise healthy premature children born at a gestational age of 32 + 0-36 + 6 weeks. Retinal vessel morphology was evaluated at mean postnatal age 7 days. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels were analysed in umbilical cord blood.
Of the 78 infants, 21 (27%) had abnormal retinal vessel morphology; they had significantly lower median (range) birth weight [1850 g, (1190-3260), vs. 2320, (1330-3580), p 
PubMed ID
24528383 View in PubMed
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Bone mineral density, bone markers, and fractures in adult males with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118415
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2013 Mar;168(3):331-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Henrik Falhammar
Helena Filipsson Nyström
Anna Wedell
Kerstin Brismar
Marja Thorén
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, D02:04, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. henrik.falhammar@ki.se
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2013 Mar;168(3):331-41
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Hyperplasia, Congenital - drug therapy - genetics - metabolism - physiopathology
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Bone Density
Bone and Bones - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology
Genetic Association Studies
Glucocorticoids - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Hormone Replacement Therapy - adverse effects
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Osteocalcin - blood
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Steroid 21-Hydroxylase - genetics - metabolism
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine bone mineral density (BMD), markers of bone metabolism, fractures, and steroids reflecting hormonal control in adult males with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). SUBJECTS, METHODS, AND DESIGN: We compared CAH males with 21-hydroxylase deficiency (n=30), 19-67 years old, with age- and sex-matched controls (n=32). Subgroups of CYP21A2 genotypes, age, glucocorticoid preparation, poor control vs overtreatment, and early vs late (>36 months) diagnosis were studied. BMD measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and markers of bone metabolism and androgens/17-hydroxyprogesterone levels were investigated.
All, including older (>30 years), CAH patients had lower BMD in all measured sites compared with control subjects. The null group demonstrated lower BMD in more locations than the other groups. Osteoporosis/osteopenia was present in 81% of CAH patients compared with 32% in controls (=30 years). Fracture frequency was similar, osteocalcin was lower, and fewer patients than controls had vitamin D insufficiency. IGF1 was elevated in the milder genotypes. In patients, total body BMD was positively correlated to weight, BMI, total lean body mass, and triglycerides, and negatively to prolactin. Patients on prednisolone had lower BMD and osteocalcin levels than those on hydrocortisone/cortisone acetate. Patients with poor control had higher femoral neck BMD. There were no differences in BMD between patients with an early vs late diagnosis.
CAH males have low BMD and bone formation markers. BMD should be monitored, adequate prophylaxis and treatment established, and glucocorticoid doses optimized to minimize the risk of future fractures.
PubMed ID
23211577 View in PubMed
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Bone mineral density in femoral neck is positively correlated to circulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 in Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190890
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2002 Jan;70(1):22-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
P. Gillberg
H. Olofsson
H. Mallmin
W F Blum
S. Ljunghall
A G Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, University Hospital, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2002 Jan;70(1):22-9
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Bone Density
Femur Neck - metabolism - radiography
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Lumbar Vertebrae - metabolism - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
Studies on the hormonal regulation of bone metabolism in men have indicated covariation between insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and sex hormones with bone mineral density (BMD). In this study the relationships between BMD in total body, lumbar spine, femoral neck, distal and ultradistal (UD) radius and circulating levels of IGFs, IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs), and sex steroids were investigated in 55 Swedish men between 22 and 85 (52 +/- 18, mean +/- SD) years of age. BMD in total body, distal and UD radius, and femoral neck was positively correlated with serum IGF-I (r = 0.31 to 0.49), IGF-II (r = 0.32 to 0.48), IGFBP-3 (r = 0.37 to 0.53), and free androgen index (FAI) (r = 0.32 to 0.40), and negatively with IGFBP-1 (r = -0.37 to -0.41) and IGFBP-2 (r = -0.29 to -0.41) levels. A positive correlation was observed between BMD in femoral neck and estradiol/SHBG ratio (r = 0.34, P = 0.01). Age correlated negatively with serum IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, FAI, estradiol/SHBG ratio, and BMD in total body, distal and UD radius, and femoral neck, and positively with IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2, and SHBG levels. According to stepwise multiple regression analyses, a combination of weight, IGFBP-3, and testosterone accounted for 43% of the variation in BMD in femoral neck, 34% in ultradistal radius and 48% in total body (P
PubMed ID
11907704 View in PubMed
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Both low and high serum IGF-I levels associate with cancer mortality in older men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120333
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Dec;97(12):4623-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Johan Svensson
Daniel Carlzon
Max Petzold
Magnus K Karlsson
Östen Ljunggren
Asa Tivesten
Dan Mellström
Claes Ohlsson
Author Affiliation
Center for Bone and Arthritis Research, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, SE-413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden. johan.svensson@medic.gu.se.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Dec;97(12):4623-30
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis - metabolism
Male
Neoplasms - blood - metabolism - mortality
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Although recent population-based studies suggest a U-shaped relationship between serum IGF-I concentration and all-cause mortality, the distribution of death causes underlying this association remains unclear. We hypothesized that high IGF-I levels associate with increased cancer mortality, whereas low IGF-I levels associate with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality.
Serum IGF-I levels were measured in 2901 elderly men (mean age 75.4, range 69-81 yr) included in the prospective population-based Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (Sweden) study. Mortality data were obtained from central registers with no loss of follow-up. The statistical analyses included Cox proportional hazards regressions with or without a spline approach.
During the follow-up (mean 6.0 yr), 586 of the participants died (cancer deaths, n = 211; CVD deaths, n = 214). As expected, our data revealed a U-shaped association between serum IGF-I levels and all-cause mortality. Low as well as high serum IGF-I (quintile 1 or 5 vs. quintiles 2-4) associated with increased cancer mortality [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.86, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.34-2.58; and HR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.37-2.65, respectively]. Only low serum IGF-I associated with increased CVD mortality (quintile 1 vs. quintiles 2-4, HR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.08-2.04). These associations remained after adjustment for multiple covariates and exclusion of men who died during the first 2 yr of follow-up.
Our findings demonstrate that both low and high serum IGF-I levels are risk markers for increased cancer mortality in older men. Moreover, low IGF-I levels associate with increased CVD mortality.
PubMed ID
23015658 View in PubMed
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Circulating insulin-like growth factor-I and benign prostatic hyperplasia--a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74978
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2001 Apr;35(2):122-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
P. Stattin
R. Kaaks
E. Riboli
P. Ferrari
H. Dechaud
G. Hallmans
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology and Andrology, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden. par.stattin@urologi.umu.se
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2001 Apr;35(2):122-6
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatic Hyperplasia - blood - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), a strongly mitogenic and anti-apoptotic factor, in the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The bioactivity of IGF-I within tissues depends on circulating levels, as well as on the local production of IGF-I and the presence of IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). The IGFBPs regulate the efflux of IGF-I to the extravascular space and the bioavailability of IGF-I within tissues. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Within the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study, 60 cases of BPH defined by a history of prostate resection were identified, and two controls per case were selected. IGF-I, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-3 and insulin were measured by immuno-radiometric assays in stored plasma samples drawn a mean of 3.2 years before surgery. RESULTS: The risk of BPH increased with increasing quartile levels of IGF-I adjusted for IGFBP-3 (p(trend) = 0.10) up to a relative risk of 2.16 (95% confidence interval 0.83-5.64) for the highest quartile. The risk decreased with increasing levels of IGFBP-1 (p(trend) = 0.10). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that elevated IGF-I bioactivity may stimulate the development of BPH; however, they were not statistically significant and require confirmation from larger studies.
PubMed ID
11411654 View in PubMed
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Circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor-I and risk of ovarian cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18876
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 Oct 20;101(6):549-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-2002
Author
Annekatrin Lukanova
Eva Lundin
Paolo Toniolo
Andrea Micheli
Arslan Akhmedkhanov
Sabina Rinaldi
Paola Muti
Per Lenner
Carine Biessy
Vittorio Krogh
Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte
Franco Berrino
Göran Hallmans
Elio Riboli
Rudolf Kaaks
Author Affiliation
Hormones and Cancer Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 Oct 20;101(6):549-54
Date
Oct-20-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Case-Control Studies
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - blood - diagnosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, a mitogenic and anti-apoptotic peptide, has been implicated in the development of several cancers. We hypothesized that high circulating IGF-I concentrations may be associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer. A case-control study was nested within 3 prospective cohorts in New York (USA), Ume? (Sweden) and Milan (Italy). One hundred thirty-two women with primary invasive epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosed at least 1 year after blood donation were case subjects. For each case, 2 control subjects were selected, matching the case subject on cohort, menopausal status, age and date of recruitment (n = 263). Only women who did not use exogenous hormones at blood donation were included in the study. There was no association between IGF-I concentrations and ovarian cancer risk in the study group as a whole. In analyses restricted to subjects who had developed ovarian cancer at a young age (
PubMed ID
12237896 View in PubMed
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Cranial radiotherapy of childhood brain tumours: growth hormone deficiency and its relation to the biological effective dose of irradiation in a large population based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20304
Source
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2000 Aug;53(2):191-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
M. Schmiegelow
S. Lassen
H S Poulsen
U. Feldt-Rasmussen
K. Schmiegelow
H. Hertz
J. Müller
Author Affiliation
Department of Growth and Reproduction, The National University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2000 Aug;53(2):191-7
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Brain Neoplasms - blood - radiotherapy
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Child
Child, Preschool
Cranial Irradiation - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Growth Hormone - blood - deficiency
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Male
Radiotherapy Dosage
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The study was to determine the incidence of GH deficiency (GHD) following cranial radiotherapy (RT) for a childhood brain tumour in a large population based study and analyse the biological effective dose (BED) to the hypothalamus/pituitary (HP) region as a risk factor. DESIGN: BED was assessed by use of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, which gives a means of expressing the biological effect of various treatment schedules in a uniform way. In patients aged >/= 18 years (n = 53) GH status was assessed by an insulin-tolerance test (ITT) (n = 34), however, in patients with seizure disorders (n = 19), and in 20 children aged /= 18 and
PubMed ID
10931100 View in PubMed
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Depressed Physical Performance Outlasts Hormonal Disturbances after Military Training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299900
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2018 Oct; 50(10):2076-2084
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Håvard Hamarsland
Gøran Paulsen
Paul A Solberg
Ole Gunnar Slaathaug
Truls Raastad
Author Affiliation
Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Department of Physical Performance, Oslo, NORWAY.
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2018 Oct; 50(10):2076-2084
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Biomarkers - blood
Body Composition
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Creatine Kinase - analysis
Humans
Hydrocortisone - analysis
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Military Personnel
Muscle strength
Norway
Physical Conditioning, Human
Physical Functional Performance
Testosterone - analysis
Thyroxine - analysis
Triiodothyronine - analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an arduous 1-wk military course on measures of physical performance, body composition, and blood biomarkers.
Participants were apprentices in an annual selection course for the Norwegian Special Forces. Fifteen soldiers (23 ± 4 yr, 1.81 ± 0.06 m, 78 ± 7 kg) completed a hell week consisting of rigorous activity only interspersed by 2 to 3 h of sleep per day. Testing was conducted before and 0, 1, 3, 7, and 14 d after the hell week. Physical performance was measured as muscle strength and jump performance. Body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance and blood samples were collected and analyzed for hormones, creatine kinase, and C-reactive protein.
Body mass was reduced by 5.3 ± 1.9 kg during the hell week and returned to baseline within 1 wk. Fat mass was reduced by 2.1 ± 1.7 kg and muscle mass by 1.9 ± 0.9 kg. Muscle strength in leg press and bench press was reduced by 20% ± 9% and 9% ± 7%, respectively, and both were approximately 10% lower than baseline after 1 wk of recovery. Jump-height was reduced by 28% ± 13% and was still 14% ± 5% below baseline after 2 wk of recovery. Testosterone was reduced by 70% ± 12% and recovered gradually within a week. Cortisol was increased by 154% ± 74% and did not fully recover during the next week. Insulin-like growth factor 1 was reduced by 51% ± 10% and triiodothyronine and thyroxine by 12% to 30%, all recovered within a week.
One-week arduous military exercise resulted in reductions in body mass and performance, as well as considerable hormonal disturbances. Our most important observation was that whereas the hormonal systems was normalized within 1 wk of rest and proper nutrition, lower body strength and jump performance were still depressed after 2 wk.
PubMed ID
29927875 View in PubMed
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Early postnatal hypoglycaemia in newborn infants of diabetic mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34031
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1997 Dec;86(12):1374-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
E. Stenninger
J. Schollin
J. Aman
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Orebro Medical Centre Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1997 Dec;86(12):1374-6
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - drug therapy
Diabetes, Gestational - complications - drug therapy
Female
Fetal Blood - metabolism
Glucagon - analysis
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Hypoglycemia - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Male
Postnatal Care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics - complications - drug therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study found that early postnatal hypoglycaemia was mainly induced by foetal hyperinsulinaemia, in close relation to maternal hyperglycaemia, even in well-controlled pregnancies of 59 mothers with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus, 29 with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and 30 with gestational diabetes mellitus. Ten of the newborn children (17%) had a blood glucose concentration below 1.0 mmol l(-1) at 2 h postnatally. Cord insulin-like growth factor-I or glucagon concentrations were not related to the early decline of blood glucose.
PubMed ID
9475319 View in PubMed
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61 records – page 1 of 7.