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Bone mineral density in femoral neck is positively correlated to circulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 in Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190890
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2002 Jan;70(1):22-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
P. Gillberg
H. Olofsson
H. Mallmin
W F Blum
S. Ljunghall
A G Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, University Hospital, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2002 Jan;70(1):22-9
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Bone Density
Femur Neck - metabolism - radiography
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Lumbar Vertebrae - metabolism - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
Studies on the hormonal regulation of bone metabolism in men have indicated covariation between insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and sex hormones with bone mineral density (BMD). In this study the relationships between BMD in total body, lumbar spine, femoral neck, distal and ultradistal (UD) radius and circulating levels of IGFs, IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs), and sex steroids were investigated in 55 Swedish men between 22 and 85 (52 +/- 18, mean +/- SD) years of age. BMD in total body, distal and UD radius, and femoral neck was positively correlated with serum IGF-I (r = 0.31 to 0.49), IGF-II (r = 0.32 to 0.48), IGFBP-3 (r = 0.37 to 0.53), and free androgen index (FAI) (r = 0.32 to 0.40), and negatively with IGFBP-1 (r = -0.37 to -0.41) and IGFBP-2 (r = -0.29 to -0.41) levels. A positive correlation was observed between BMD in femoral neck and estradiol/SHBG ratio (r = 0.34, P = 0.01). Age correlated negatively with serum IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, FAI, estradiol/SHBG ratio, and BMD in total body, distal and UD radius, and femoral neck, and positively with IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2, and SHBG levels. According to stepwise multiple regression analyses, a combination of weight, IGFBP-3, and testosterone accounted for 43% of the variation in BMD in femoral neck, 34% in ultradistal radius and 48% in total body (P
PubMed ID
11907704 View in PubMed
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Circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor-I and risk of ovarian cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18876
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 Oct 20;101(6):549-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-2002
Author
Annekatrin Lukanova
Eva Lundin
Paolo Toniolo
Andrea Micheli
Arslan Akhmedkhanov
Sabina Rinaldi
Paola Muti
Per Lenner
Carine Biessy
Vittorio Krogh
Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte
Franco Berrino
Göran Hallmans
Elio Riboli
Rudolf Kaaks
Author Affiliation
Hormones and Cancer Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 Oct 20;101(6):549-54
Date
Oct-20-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Case-Control Studies
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - blood - diagnosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, a mitogenic and anti-apoptotic peptide, has been implicated in the development of several cancers. We hypothesized that high circulating IGF-I concentrations may be associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer. A case-control study was nested within 3 prospective cohorts in New York (USA), Ume? (Sweden) and Milan (Italy). One hundred thirty-two women with primary invasive epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosed at least 1 year after blood donation were case subjects. For each case, 2 control subjects were selected, matching the case subject on cohort, menopausal status, age and date of recruitment (n = 263). Only women who did not use exogenous hormones at blood donation were included in the study. There was no association between IGF-I concentrations and ovarian cancer risk in the study group as a whole. In analyses restricted to subjects who had developed ovarian cancer at a young age (
PubMed ID
12237896 View in PubMed
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Cranial radiotherapy of childhood brain tumours: growth hormone deficiency and its relation to the biological effective dose of irradiation in a large population based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20304
Source
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2000 Aug;53(2):191-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
M. Schmiegelow
S. Lassen
H S Poulsen
U. Feldt-Rasmussen
K. Schmiegelow
H. Hertz
J. Müller
Author Affiliation
Department of Growth and Reproduction, The National University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2000 Aug;53(2):191-7
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Brain Neoplasms - blood - radiotherapy
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Child
Child, Preschool
Cranial Irradiation - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Growth Hormone - blood - deficiency
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Male
Radiotherapy Dosage
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The study was to determine the incidence of GH deficiency (GHD) following cranial radiotherapy (RT) for a childhood brain tumour in a large population based study and analyse the biological effective dose (BED) to the hypothalamus/pituitary (HP) region as a risk factor. DESIGN: BED was assessed by use of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, which gives a means of expressing the biological effect of various treatment schedules in a uniform way. In patients aged >/= 18 years (n = 53) GH status was assessed by an insulin-tolerance test (ITT) (n = 34), however, in patients with seizure disorders (n = 19), and in 20 children aged /= 18 and
PubMed ID
10931100 View in PubMed
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Effect of severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency due to a mutation in the GH-releasing hormone receptor on insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF-binding proteins, and ternary complex formation throughout life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200278
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1999 Nov;84(11):4118-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
M H Aguiar-Oliveira
M S Gill
E S de A Barretto
M R Alcântara
F. Miraki-Moud
C A Menezes
A H Souza
C E Martinelli
F A Pereira
R. Salvatori
M A Levine
S M Shalet
C. Camacho-Hubner
P E Clayton
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology, Federal University of Sergipe, Aracaju, Brazil.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1999 Nov;84(11):4118-26
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Human Growth Hormone - deficiency
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 1 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 2 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - metabolism
Insulin-Like Growth Factor II - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Receptors, Neuropeptide - genetics
Receptors, Pituitary Hormone-Regulating Hormone - genetics
Abstract
Measurement of the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins has become commonplace in the indirect assessment of the integrity of the GH axis. However, the relative effect of GH deficiency (GHD) on each component of the IGF axis and the merit of any one parameter as a diagnostic test have not been defined in a homogeneous population across all ages. We therefore measured IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), IGFBP-2, IGFBP-3, and acid labile subunit (ALS) in 27 GHD subjects (aged 5-82 yr) from an extended kindred in Northeast Brazil with an identical GHRH receptor mutation and in 55 indigenous controls (aged 5-80 yr). The effect of GHD on the theoretical distribution of IGFs between the IGFBPs and the ternary complex was also examined. All components of the IGF axis, measured and theoretical, showed complete separation between GHD and control subjects, except IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 concentrations, which did not differ. The most profound effects of GHD were on total IGF-I, IGF-I in the ternary complex, and ALS. The proportion of IGF-I associated with IGFBP-3 remained constant throughout life, but was significantly lower in GHD due to an increase in IGF-I/IGFBP-2 complexes. IGF-I in the ternary complex was determined principally by concentrations of ALS in GHD and IGFBP-3 in controls, implying that ALS has greater GH dependency. In the controls, IGF-II was associated primarily with IGFBP-3 and to a lesser extent with IGFBP-2, whereas in GHD the reverse was found. There was also a dramatic decline in the proportion of free ALS in GHD adults that was not evident in controls. As diagnostic tests, IGF-I in the ternary complex and total IGF-I provided the greatest separation between GHD and controls in childhood. Similarly, in older adults the best separation was achieved with IGF-I in the ternary complex, with free ALS being optimal in younger adults. Severe GHD not only reduces the amounts of IGFs, IGFBP-3, and ALS, but also modifies the distribution of the IGFs bound to each IGFBP. Diagnostic tests used in the investigation of GHD should be tailored to the age of the individual. In particular, measurement of IGF-I in the ternary complex may prove useful in the diagnosis of GHD in children and older adults, whereas free ALS may be more relevant to younger adults.
PubMed ID
10566659 View in PubMed
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Effect of sex hormone replacement on the insulin-like growth factor system and bone mineral: a cross-sectional and longitudinal study in 595 perimenopausal women participating in the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201505
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1999 Jul;84(7):2286-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
P. Vestergaard
A P Hermann
H. Orskov
L. Mosekilde
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1999 Jul;84(7):2286-90
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Density
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Estradiol - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Humans
Hysterectomy
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - metabolism
Insulin-Like Growth Factor II - metabolism
Longitudinal Studies
Menopause
Middle Aged
Norethindrone - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - prevention & control
Abstract
This study used a cross-sectional design to investigate relationships among serum insulin-like growth factor (IGF) parameters (total serum IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGF-binding protein-3), serum estradiol, and bone mineral density (BMD) stratified for potential confounders, and a longitudinal design to investigate the effects of hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) on IGFs and BMD. Five hundred and ninety-five perimenopausal women (median age, 50.0 yr; range, 45-56 yr) participating in the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study were investigated in a cross-sectional study, and a randomly selected subgroup of 110 was followed after 5 yr in a longitudinal study for changes in serum IGFs and BMD of lumbar spine, femoral neck, and ultradistal forearm during (n = 46) or without HRT (n = 64). In the cross-sectional study, serum IGF-I correlated positively to distal forearm BMD and spine BMD, but not to femoral neck BMD, after stratification for age, body mass index, and other variables. In the follow-up study, HRT decreased IGF-I and IGF-II, but did not influence the age-related decline in IGF-binding protein-3 significantly. Serum alkaline phosphatase and urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine ratio both decreased during HRT, whereas BMD increased compared to control values. After adjustment for age, body mass index, treatment, and other factors, IGF-I correlated positively to changes in forearm and femoral neck BMD, but not to changes in spine BMD. We conclude that serum IGF-I was positively associated to bone mineral density. Oral HRT decreases IGF-I and IGF-II.
PubMed ID
10404791 View in PubMed
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The effects of valproate, carbamazepine, and oxcarbazepine on growth and sexual maturation in girls with epilepsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33472
Source
Pediatrics. 1999 Mar;103(3):588-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
J. Rättyä
L. Vainionpää
M. Knip
P. Lanning
J I Isojärvi
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Pediatrics. 1999 Mar;103(3):588-93
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Anticonvulsants - therapeutic use
Carbamazepine - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Epilepsy - blood - drug therapy - physiopathology
Female
Growth - drug effects
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 1 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sexual Maturation - drug effects
Valproic Acid - therapeutic use
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have endocrine effects that may interfere with growth and sexual maturation in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of AEDs on growth and pubertal development in girls with epilepsy. STUDY DESIGN: Forty girls taking valproate (VPA), 19 girls taking carbamazepine (CBZ), and 18 girls taking oxcarbazepine (OXC) for epilepsy and 49 healthy control girls participated in the study, which included a cross-sectional clinical examination when the girls were 8 to 18 years old and a longitudinal growth analysis from the age of 1 year. RESULTS: VPA, CBZ, or OXC did not affect linear growth or pubertal development in girls with epilepsy. However, the patients taking VPA gained weight, and an increase in relative weight was seen in girls who started their medication before as well as during puberty. The body mass index of the VPA-treated girls (19.8 +/- 4.8 kg/m2) was higher than that of the control girls (18.0 +/- 2.5 kg/m2) at clinical examination. The weight of the girls taking CBZ or OXC for epilepsy was similar to that of the control girls. Plasma insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels were higher in girls treated with CBZ and OXC than in the control girls, but AEDs did not affect fasting serum insulin, IGF-binding protein-1, or IGF-binding protein-3 concentrations in girls on VPA, CBZ, or OXC medication during the period of exposure (average 2.8, 4.1, and 1.9 years, respectively) in this study. CONCLUSIONS: AEDs do not seem to have any adverse effects on linear growth or sexual maturation in girls with epilepsy. VPA-related weight gain can be seen already in prepuberty and it is not associated with hyperinsulinemia in these young patients. The clinical significance of high circulating concentrations of IGF-I in patients taking CBZ or OXC remains to be defined.
PubMed ID
10049961 View in PubMed
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Growth hormone (GH) deficiency in patients with beta-thalassemia major and the efficacy of recombinant GH treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30810
Source
Ann Hematol. 2003 Oct;82(10):637-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
K H Wu
F J Tsai
C T Peng
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, China Medical College Hospital, 2 Yuh-Der Road, 404 Taichung, Taiwan.
Source
Ann Hematol. 2003 Oct;82(10):637-40
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height
Child
Comparative Study
Female
Growth Disorders - drug therapy - etiology
Human Growth Hormone - deficiency - therapeutic use
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Male
Recombinant Proteins - therapeutic use
beta-Thalassemia - complications
Abstract
Patients with beta-thalassemia major still suffer growth retardation. After excluding patients with cortisol deficiency, hypothyroidism, hypogonadism, delayed puberty, malnutrition, severe congestive heart failure, and severely impaired liver function, 29 patients were enrolled in this study. Fifteen (52%) patients exhibited growth retardation and underwent two growth hormone (GH) provocation tests. Eight (53%) of the 15 patients had GH deficiency and were subsequently treated with subcutaneous recombinant human GH (Genotropin, Pharmacia Corporation, Sweden). Growth velocity increased from the pretreatment rate of 3.1+/-0.4 cm/year to 7.1+/-1.6 cm/yr (p
PubMed ID
12898188 View in PubMed
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High levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor-I increase prostate cancer risk: a prospective study in a population-based nonscreened cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17580
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2004 Aug 1;22(15):3104-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2004
Author
Pär Stattin
Sabina Rinaldi
Carine Biessy
Ulf-Håkan Stenman
Göran Hallmans
Rudolf Kaaks
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery and Perioperative sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University Hospital, 901 85 Umeå, Sweden. par.stattin@urologi.umu.se
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2004 Aug 1;22(15):3104-12
Date
Aug-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) stimulates proliferation and inhibits apoptosis in prostate cancer cells, and IGF-I has been associated with increased prostate cancer risk in some, but not all, epidemiologic studies. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We extended our previous case-control study nested in the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Cohort, a population-based cohort from a region where little prostate specific antigen (PSA) screening is done. Levels of IGF-I and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) were measured in prediagnostic blood samples from a total of 281 men who were subsequently diagnosed with prostate cancer after recruitment (median, 5 years after blood collection) and from 560 matched controls. RESULTS: Logistic regression analyses showed increases in prostate cancer risk with increasing plasma peptide levels, up to an odds ratio (OR) for top versus bottom quartile of IGF-I of 1.67 (95% CI, 1.02 to 2.71; Ptrend = .05), which was attenuated after adjustment for IGFBP-3 to an OR of 1.47 (95% CI, 0.81 to 2.64; P (trend) =.32). For men younger than 59 years at recruitment, OR for top versus bottom quartile of IGF-I was 4.12 (95% CI, 1.01 to 16.70; Ptrend = .002), which was significantly stronger than for men older than 59 years (P (interaction) = .006). For men with advanced cancer, OR for top versus bottom quartile of IGF-I was 2.87 (95% CI, 1.01 to 8.12; Ptrend = .10). CONCLUSION: Our data add further support for IGF-I as an etiologic factor in prostate cancer and indicate that circulating IGF-I levels measured at a comparatively young age may be most strongly associated with prostate cancer risk.
PubMed ID
15284261 View in PubMed
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IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and breast cancer in young women: a pooled re-analysis of three prospective studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16638
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2005 Dec;14(6):493-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Sabina Rinaldi
Paolo Toniolo
Paola Muti
Eva Lundin
Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte
Alan Arslan
Andrea Micheli
Per Lenner
Laure Dossus
Vittorio Krogh
Roy E Shore
Karen L Koenig
Elio Riboli
Pär Stattin
Franco Berrino
Göran Hallmans
Annekatrin Lukanova
Rudolf Kaaks
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon, Cedex 08, France.
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2005 Dec;14(6):493-6
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Breast Neoplasms - etiology - genetics - pathology
Case-Control Studies
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Italy
Middle Aged
New York
Premenopause
Prospective Studies
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Abstract
Prospective cohort studies on breast cancer risk among premenopausal women and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) concentrations have so far included only few cases, and have shown inconsistent relative risk estimates. We pooled 220 cases of breast cancer diagnosed before age 50, and 434 control subjects, from three prospective studies in New York (USA), Umeå (Northern Sweden) and Milan (Italy), and we measured IGF-I and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) with common enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Overall, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 measurements obtained by the common method showed a positive but not significant relationship with breast cancer risk (odds ratios (ORs) 0.90 [95% confidence intervals (95% CI) 0.50-1.62], 1.63 [0.89-2.97], 1.46 [0.78-2.73] and 1.41 [0.75-2.63] for quintiles of IGF-I, and ORs 0.98 [0.54-1.75], 1.06 [0.59-1.91], 1.04 [0.58-1.87] and 1.77 [0.97-3.24] for quintiles of IGFBP-3). Our results give only moderate support for an association of blood IGF-I with breast cancer risk in young women.
PubMed ID
16284492 View in PubMed
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IGF-I, IGFBP-3, and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio: no association with incident colorectal cancer in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156144
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Jul;17(7):1832-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Joshua B Max
Paul J Limburg
Adeboye Ogunseitan
Rachael Z Stolzenberg-Solomon
Robert A Vierkant
Michael J Pollak
Thomas A Sellers
Jarmo Virtamo
James R Cerhan
Demetrius Albanes
Author Affiliation
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Jul;17(7):1832-4
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Colorectal Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - metabolism
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
alpha-Tocopherol - therapeutic use
beta Carotene - therapeutic use
Notes
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001 Jul;10(7):725-3111440957
Cites: Acta Oncol. 2002;41(4):381-812234031
Cites: Cancer Lett. 2003 Jun 10;195(2):127-3712767520
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Apr 24;363(9418):1346-5315110491
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2007 May 1;120(9):2007-1217266031
Cites: Biometrics. 1994 Dec;50(4):1064-727786988
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Jan 1;145(1):72-808982025
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Apr;14(4):850-515824155
Cites: Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006 Dec;4(12):1514-2117162243
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 1994 Jan;4(1):1-108205268
PubMed ID
18628438 View in PubMed
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37 records – page 1 of 4.