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1H-MRS Measured Ectopic Fat in Liver and Muscle in Danish Lean and Obese Children and Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273208
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Cilius Esmann Fonvig
Elizaveta Chabanova
Ehm Astrid Andersson
Johanne Dam Ohrt
Oluf Pedersen
Torben Hansen
Henrik S Thomsen
Jens-Christian Holm
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dyslipidemias - blood
Fatty Liver - pathology
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Intra-Abdominal Fat - pathology
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Liver - metabolism - pathology
Male
Muscles - pathology
Overweight
Pediatric Obesity - blood - pathology
Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Puberty
Sex Factors
Subcutaneous Fat - pathology
Abstract
This cross sectional study aims to investigate the associations between ectopic lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle and biochemical measures, estimates of insulin resistance, anthropometry, and blood pressure in lean and overweight/obese children.
Fasting plasma glucose, serum lipids, serum insulin, and expressions of insulin resistance, anthropometry, blood pressure, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver and muscle fat were obtained in 327 Danish children and adolescents aged 8-18 years.
In 287 overweight/obese children, the prevalences of hepatic and muscular steatosis were 31% and 68%, respectively, whereas the prevalences in 40 lean children were 3% and 10%, respectively. A multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index z-score (BMI SDS), and pubertal development showed that the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 4.2 (95%CI: [1.8; 10.2], p = 0.0009) when hepatic steatosis was present. Comparing the simultaneous presence of hepatic and muscular steatosis with no presence of steatosis, the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 5.8 (95%CI: [2.0; 18.6], p = 0.002). No significant associations between muscle fat and dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose, or blood pressure were observed. Liver and muscle fat, adjusted for age, sex, BMI SDS, and pubertal development, associated to BMI SDS and glycosylated hemoglobin, while only liver fat associated to visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipid associated inversely to high density lipoprotein cholesterol.
Hepatic steatosis is associated with dyslipidemia and liver and muscle fat depositions are linked to obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions, especially glycosylated hemoglobin, in children and adolescents, which suggest an increased cardiovascular disease risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26252778 View in PubMed
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Are left ventricular mass, geometry and function related to vascular changes and/or insulin resistance in long-standing hypertension? ICARUS: a LIFE substudy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53541
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2003 May;17(5):305-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
M H Olsen
E. Hjerkinn
K. Wachtell
A. Høieggen
J N Bella
S D Nesbitt
E. Fossum
S E Kjeldsen
S. Julius
H. Ibsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Glostrup University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. mho@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2003 May;17(5):305-11
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Flow Velocity - physiology
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood Pressure - physiology
Carotid Artery, Common - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Denmark
Diastole - physiology
Echocardiography
Female
Heart Ventricles - metabolism - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Humans
Hypertension - metabolism - physiopathology
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - metabolism - physiopathology
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Statistics
Stroke Volume - physiology
Systole - physiology
United States
Vascular Resistance - physiology
Ventricular Function, Left - physiology
Ventricular Remodeling - physiology
Abstract
Vascular hypertrophy and insulin resistance have been associated with abnormal left ventricular (LV) geometry in population studies. We wanted to investigate the influence of vascular hypertrophy and insulin resistance on LV hypertrophy and its function in patients with hypertension. In 89 patients with essential hypertension and electrocardiographic LV hypertrophy, we measured blood pressure; insulin sensitivity by hyperinsulinaemic euglucaemic clamp; minimal forearm vascular resistance (MFVR) by plethysmography; intima-media cross-sectional area of the common carotid arteries (IMA) by ultrasound; and LV mass, relative wall thickness (RWT), systolic function and diastolic filling by echocardiography after two weeks of placebo treatment. LV mass index correlated to IMA/height (r=0.36, P=0.001), serum insulin (r=-0.25, P
Notes
Comment In: J Hum Hypertens. 2003 May;17(5):299-30412756401
PubMed ID
12756402 View in PubMed
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Associations of multiple lipoprotein and apolipoprotein measures with worsening of glycemia and incident type 2 diabetes in 6607 non-diabetic Finnish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269094
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2015 May;240(1):272-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Maria Fizelova
Manna Miilunpohja
Antti J Kangas
Pasi Soininen
Johanna Kuusisto
Mika Ala-Korpela
Markku Laakso
Alena Stancáková
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2015 May;240(1):272-7
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Apolipoprotein A-I - blood
Apolipoprotein B-100 - blood
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Dyslipidemias - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
We investigated the association of various lipoprotein traits, apolipoproteins and their ratios with the deterioration of glycemia, incident type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and insulin secretion in a large population-based Metabolic Syndrome Men (METSIM) Study.
The METSIM Study includes 10,197 Finnish men, aged 45-73 years, and examined in 2005-2010. From 6607 non-diabetic participants without statin treatment at baseline, 386 developed incident type 2 diabetes during a 5.9-year follow-up. A total of 3330 non-diabetic participants without statin treatment had both baseline and follow-up visit data, and were included in statistical analyses of the worsening of glycemia.
Compared to single lipid and lipoprotein measurements, lipoprotein and apolipoprotein ratios were better predictors of the glucose area under the curve and incident type 2 diabetes after adjustment for confounding factors. The apolipoprotein B/LDL cholesterol ratio was the strongest predictor of the worsening of glycemia, whereas the apolipoprotein A1/HDL cholesterol ratio was the strongest predictor of incident type 2 diabetes. The associations of lipoprotein traits, apolipoproteins and their ratios with insulin sensitivity were stronger than those with insulin secretion.
The apolipoprotein B/LDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A1/HDL cholesterol ratios were the strongest predictors of the worsening of glycemia and incident type 2 diabetes, respectively.
PubMed ID
25818853 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular disease risk factors and blood pressure response during exercise in healthy children and adolescents: the European Youth Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142130
Source
J Appl Physiol (1985). 2010 Oct;109(4):1125-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Niels C Møller
Anders Grøntved
Niels Wedderkopp
Mathias Ried-Larsen
Peter L Kristensen
Lars B Andersen
Karsten Froberg
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research in Childhood Health, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, Univ. of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense, Denmark. ncmoller@health.sdu.dk
Source
J Appl Physiol (1985). 2010 Oct;109(4):1125-32
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adolescent
Age Factors
Bicycling
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - physiopathology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Exercise
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Lipids - blood
Male
Physical Fitness
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sphygmomanometers
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Raised blood pressure (BP) response during exercise independently predicts future hypertension. Subjects with higher BP in childhood also have elevated BP later in life. Therefore, the factors related to the regulation of exercise BP in children needs to be well understood. We hypothesized that physiological cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors would influence BP response during exercise in children and adolescents. This is a cross-sectional study of 439 Danish third-grade children and 364 ninth-grade adolescents. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured with sphygmomanometer during a maximal aerobic fitness test. Examined CVD risk factors were high-density lipoprotein (HDL)- and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, triglyceride, homeostasis model of assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) score, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and aerobic fitness. A random effect model was used to test the hypotheses. In boys, HOMA-IR score and BMI were positively related to SBP response during exercise (ß = 1.03, P = 0.001, and ß = 0.58, P = 0.017, respectively). The effects sizes of HOMA-IR score and BMI and the significance levels only changed slightly (ß = 0.91, P = 0.004, and ß = 0.43, P = 0.08, respectively) when the two variables were added in the same model. A significant positive association was observed between aerobic fitness and SBP response in girls (ß = 3.13 and P = 0.002). HOMA-IR score and BMI were found to be positively related to the SBP response in male children and youth. At least partly, adiposity and insulin sensitivity seem to influence exercise SBP through different mechanisms. The positive relationship observed between aerobic fitness and SBP response in girls remains unexplainable for us, although post hoc analyses revealed that it was the case in the ninth graders only.
PubMed ID
20634358 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with the metabolic syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47727
Source
Diabetes Care. 2001 Apr;24(4):683-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
B. Isomaa
P. Almgren
T. Tuomi
B. Forsén
K. Lahti
M. Nissén
M R Taskinen
L. Groop
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Jakobstad Hospital, Finland. bo.isomaa@fimnet.fi
Source
Diabetes Care. 2001 Apr;24(4):683-9
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Albuminuria - epidemiology
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Cholesterol - blood
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - complications - epidemiology
Family
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Glucose Intolerance - blood - complications - epidemiology
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - blood
Hypertension - epidemiology
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Obesity - epidemiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of and the cardiovascular risk associated with the metabolic syndrome using the new definition proposed by the World Health Organization RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 4,483 subjects aged 35-70 years participating in a large family study of type 2 diabetes in Finland and Sweden (the Botnia study) were included in the analysis of cardiovascular risk associated with the metabolic syndrome. In subjects who had type 2 diabetes (n = 1,697), impaired fasting glucose (IFG)/impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (n = 798) or insulin-resistance with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) (n = 1,988), the metabolic syndrome was defined as presence of at least two of the following risk factors: obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, or microalbuminuria. Cardiovascular mortality was assessed in 3,606 subjects with a median follow-up of 6.9 years. RESULTS: In women and men, respectively, the metabolic syndrome was seen in 10 and 15% of subjects with NGT, 42 and 64% of those with IFG/IGT, and 78 and 84% of those with type 2 diabetes. The risk for coronary heart disease and stroke was increased threefold in subjects with the syndrome (P
PubMed ID
11315831 View in PubMed
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Clinical correlates of insulin sensitivity and its association with mortality among men with CKD stages 3 and 4.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259511
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2014 Apr;9(4):690-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Hong Xu
Xiaoyan Huang
Johan Arnlöv
Tommy Cederholm
Peter Stenvinkel
Bengt Lindholm
Ulf Risérus
Juan Jesús Carrero
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2014 Apr;9(4):690-7
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Kidney - physiopathology
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - diagnosis - mortality
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - blood - diagnosis - mortality - physiopathology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Insulin resistance participates in the pathogenesis of multiple metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. CKD patients have impaired insulin sensitivity, but the clinical correlates and outcome associations of impaired insulin sensitivity in this vulnerable population are not well defined.
The prospective cohort study was from the third examination cycle of the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men, a population-based survey of elderly men ages 70-71 years; insulin sensitivity was assessed by glucose disposal rate as measured with euglycemic clamps. Inclusion criterion was eGFR
Notes
Comment In: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2014 Apr;9(4):638-4024677558
PubMed ID
24436478 View in PubMed
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Coffee and tea consumption and risk of stroke subtypes in male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158068
Source
Stroke. 2008 Jun;39(6):1681-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Satu Männistö
Mikko J Virtanen
Jukka Kontto
Demetrius Albanes
Jarmo Virtamo
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Stroke. 2008 Jun;39(6):1681-7
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Antioxidants - therapeutic use
Cerebral Hemorrhage - drug therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Coffee
Cohort Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain - drug therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stroke - drug therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Tea
Abstract
Coffee and tea consumption could potentially reduce the risk of stroke because these beverages have antioxidant properties, and coffee may improve insulin sensitivity. We examined the associations of coffee and tea consumption with risk of stroke subtypes.
We used prospective data from the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study, a cohort study of 26 556 male Finnish smokers aged 50 to 69 years without a history of stroke at baseline. Coffee and tea consumption was assessed at baseline using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. During a mean follow-up of 13.6 years, from 1985 through December 2004, 2702 cerebral infarctions, 383 intracerebral hemorrhages, and 196 subarachnoid hemorrhages were ascertained from national registries.
After adjustment for age and cardiovascular risk factors, both consumption of coffee and tea was statistically significantly inversely associated with the risk of cerebral infarction but not intracerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage. The multivariate relative risk of cerebral infarction for men in the highest category of coffee consumption (>/=8 cups/d) was 0.77 (95% CI, 0.66 to 0.90; P for trend /=2 cups/d) with those in the lowest category (nondrinkers) was 0.79 (95% CI, 0.68 to 0.92; P for trend=0.002).
These results suggest that high consumption of coffee and tea may reduce the risk of cerebral infarction among men, independent of known cardiovascular risk factors.
PubMed ID
18369170 View in PubMed
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Differences in insulin sensitivity and risk markers due to gender and age in hypertensives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52502
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2000 Jan;14(1):51-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
P M Nilsson
L. Lind
T. Pollare
C. Berne
H. Lithell
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatrics, Samariterhemmet Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2000 Jan;14(1):51-6
Date
Jan-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Hypertension - blood - etiology
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Lipoproteins - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients
Premenopause - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Men run a higher risk for cardiovascular disease than women, even if hypertensive. This has been attributed to a more pronounced central (abdominal) fat distribution in men as well as menopausal state in women. The hypothesis to be tested in hypertensives was that men have more pronounced insulin resistance and other cardiovascular risk factors than pre-menopausal, but not post-menopausal, women. We carried out a cross-sectional observation study of middle-aged hypertensives of both sexes, divided into two age groups, below or over 50 years of age. The study was performed in untreated out-patients, visiting a hypertension policlinic, in Uppsala, Sweden. Three hundred men and 170 women with a mean age of 57 years were investigated. Measurements were taken by: physical examination (body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, blood pressure); intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT); euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp; and blood sampling for lipoprotein lipid fractions, uric acid, and free fatty acids. The results were that pre-menopausal women showed a higher insulin-mediated glucose disposal (7.6 vs5.8 mg/kg/min; P
PubMed ID
10673732 View in PubMed
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A family history of diabetes is associated with reduced physical fitness in the Prevalence, Prediction and Prevention of Diabetes (PPP)-Botnia study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143694
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 Aug;53(8):1709-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
B. Isomaa
B. Forsén
K. Lahti
N. Holmström
J. Wadén
O. Matintupa
P. Almgren
J G Eriksson
V. Lyssenko
M-R Taskinen
T. Tuomi
L C Groop
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Genetic Institute, Helsinki, Finland. bo.isoma@folkhalsan.fi
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 Aug;53(8):1709-13
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body Composition
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - metabolism
Family
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Insulin-Secreting Cells - metabolism
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Fitness - physiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Registries
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
We studied the impact of a family history of type 2 diabetes on physical fitness, lifestyle factors and diabetes-related metabolic factors.
The Prevalence, Prediction and Prevention of Diabetes (PPP)-Botnia study is a population-based study in Western Finland, which includes a random sample of 5,208 individuals aged 18 to 75 years identified through the national Finnish Population Registry. Physical activity, dietary habits and family history of type 2 diabetes were assessed by questionnaires and physical fitness by a validated 2 km walking test. Insulin secretion and action were assessed based upon OGTT measurements of insulin and glucose.
A family history of type 2 diabetes was associated with a 2.4-fold risk of diabetes and lower physical fitness (maximal aerobic capacity 29.2 +/- 7.2 vs 32.1 +/- 7.0, p = 0.01) despite having similar reported physical activity to that of individuals with no family history. The same individuals also had reduced insulin secretion adjusted for insulin resistance, i.e. disposition index (p
PubMed ID
20454776 View in PubMed
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Fasting triglycerides as a predictor of incident diabetes, insulin resistance and ß-cell function in a Canadian First Nation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290415
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1310444
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Natalie D Riediger
Kirsten Clark
Virginia Lukianchuk
Joanne Roulette
Sharon Bruce
Author Affiliation
a Department of Community Health Sciences, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences , University of Manitoba , Winnipeg , Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1310444
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body mass index
Body Weights and Measures
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - ethnology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Insulin Resistance - ethnology
Insulin-Secreting Cells - metabolism
Lipids - blood
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Diabetes prevalence is substantially higher among Canadian First Nations populations than the non-First Nation population. Fasting serum triglycerides have been found to be an important predictor of incident diabetes among non-indigenous populations. However, there is a great need to understand diabetes progression within specific ethnic groups, particularly First Nations populations.
The purpose of this study was to test for an association between fasting serum triglycerides and incident diabetes, changes in insulin resistance and changes in ß-cell function in a Manitoba First Nation cohort.
Study data were from two diabetes screening studies in Sandy Bay First Nation in Manitoba, Canada, collected in 2002/2003 and 2011/2012. The cohort was composed of respondents to both screening studies (n=171). Fasting blood samples and anthropometric, health and demographic data were collected. A generalised linear model with Poisson distribution was used to test for an association between fasting triglycerides and incident diabetes.
There were 35 incident cases of diabetes among 128 persons without diabetes at baseline. Participants who developed incident type 2 diabetes were significantly older and had significantly higher body mass index (BMI; p=0.012), total cholesterol (p=0.007), fasting triglycerides (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
28406758 View in PubMed
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41 records – page 1 of 5.