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1H-MRS Measured Ectopic Fat in Liver and Muscle in Danish Lean and Obese Children and Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273208
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Cilius Esmann Fonvig
Elizaveta Chabanova
Ehm Astrid Andersson
Johanne Dam Ohrt
Oluf Pedersen
Torben Hansen
Henrik S Thomsen
Jens-Christian Holm
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dyslipidemias - blood
Fatty Liver - pathology
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Intra-Abdominal Fat - pathology
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Liver - metabolism - pathology
Male
Muscles - pathology
Overweight
Pediatric Obesity - blood - pathology
Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Puberty
Sex Factors
Subcutaneous Fat - pathology
Abstract
This cross sectional study aims to investigate the associations between ectopic lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle and biochemical measures, estimates of insulin resistance, anthropometry, and blood pressure in lean and overweight/obese children.
Fasting plasma glucose, serum lipids, serum insulin, and expressions of insulin resistance, anthropometry, blood pressure, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver and muscle fat were obtained in 327 Danish children and adolescents aged 8-18 years.
In 287 overweight/obese children, the prevalences of hepatic and muscular steatosis were 31% and 68%, respectively, whereas the prevalences in 40 lean children were 3% and 10%, respectively. A multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index z-score (BMI SDS), and pubertal development showed that the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 4.2 (95%CI: [1.8; 10.2], p = 0.0009) when hepatic steatosis was present. Comparing the simultaneous presence of hepatic and muscular steatosis with no presence of steatosis, the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 5.8 (95%CI: [2.0; 18.6], p = 0.002). No significant associations between muscle fat and dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose, or blood pressure were observed. Liver and muscle fat, adjusted for age, sex, BMI SDS, and pubertal development, associated to BMI SDS and glycosylated hemoglobin, while only liver fat associated to visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipid associated inversely to high density lipoprotein cholesterol.
Hepatic steatosis is associated with dyslipidemia and liver and muscle fat depositions are linked to obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions, especially glycosylated hemoglobin, in children and adolescents, which suggest an increased cardiovascular disease risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26252778 View in PubMed
Less detail

The -238 and -308 G-->A polymorphisms of the tumor necrosis factor alpha gene promoter are not associated with features of the insulin resistance syndrome or altered birth weight in Danish Caucasians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47878
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2000 Apr;85(4):1731-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
S K Rasmussen
S A Urhammer
J N Jensen
T. Hansen
K. Borch-Johnsen
O. Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center and Hagedorn Research Institute, Gentofte, Denmark.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2000 Apr;85(4):1731-4
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Weight - genetics
Body constitution
Body mass index
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - genetics
Female
Genotype
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance - genetics
Lipids - blood
Male
Obesity - genetics
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - genetics
Abstract
Recently, two G-->A polymorphisms at positions -308 and -238, in the promoter of the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gene, have been identified. These variants have, in different ethnic groups, been linked to estimates of insulin resistance and obesity. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether these genetic variants of TNF-alpha were associated with features of the insulin resistance syndrome or alterations in birth weight in two Danish study populations comprising 380 unrelated young healthy subjects and 249 glucose-tolerant relatives of type 2 diabetic patients, respectively. All study participants underwent an iv glucose tolerance test with the addition of tolbutamide after 20 min. In addition, a number of biochemical and anthropometric measures were performed on each subject. The subjects were genotyped for the polymorphisms by applying PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism. Neither of the variants was related to altered insulin sensitivity index or other features of the insulin resistance syndrome (body mass index, waist to hip ratio, fat mass, fasting serum lipids or fasting serum insulin or C-peptide). Birth weight and the ponderal index were also not associated with the polymorphisms. In conclusion, although the study was carried out on sufficiently large study samples, the study does not support a major role of the -308 or -238 substitutions of the TNF-alpha gene in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance or altered birth weight among Danish Caucasian subjects.
PubMed ID
10770222 View in PubMed
Less detail

The -250G>A promoter variant in hepatic lipase associates with elevated fasting serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol modulated by interaction with physical activity in a study of 16,156 Danish subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85800
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Jun;93(6):2294-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Grarup Niels
Andreasen Camilla H
Andersen Mette K
Albrechtsen Anders
Sandbaek Annelli
Lauritzen Torsten
Borch-Johnsen Knut
Jørgensen Torben
Schmitz Ole
Hansen Torben
Pedersen Oluf
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center, Niels Steensens Vej 1, Gentofte, Denmark. ngrp@steno.dk
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Jun;93(6):2294-9
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - genetics
Fasting - blood
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Screening
Genotype
Heterozygote
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Linkage Disequilibrium
Lipase - genetics
Motor Activity - genetics - physiology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Abstract
CONTEXT: Hepatic lipase plays a pivotal role in the metabolism of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein by involvement in reverse cholesterol transport and the formation of atherogenic small dense low-density lipoprotein. OBJECTIVES: The objective was to investigate the impact of variants in LIPC on metabolic traits and type 2 diabetes in a large sample of Danes. Because behavioral factors influence hepatic lipase activity, we furthermore examined possible gene-environment interactions in the population-based Inter99 study. DESIGN: The LIPC -250G>A (rs2070895) variant was genotyped in the Inter99 study (n = 6070), the Anglo-Danish-Dutch Study of Intensive Treatment in People with Screen Detected Diabetes in Primary Care Denmark screening cohort of individuals with risk factors for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes (n = 8662), and in additional type 2 diabetic patients (n = 1,064) and glucose-tolerant control subjects (n = 360). RESULTS: In the Inter99 study, the A allele of rs2070895 associated with a 0.057 mmol/liter [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.039-0.075] increase in fasting serum HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c) (P = 8 x 10(-10)) supported by association in the Anglo-Danish-Dutch Study of Intensive Treatment in People with Screen Detected Diabetes in Primary Care study [0.038 mmol/liter per allele (95% CI 0.024-0.053); P = 2 x 10(-7)). The allelic effect on HDL-c was modulated by interaction with self-reported physical activity (P(interaction) = 0.002) because vigorous physically active homozygous A-allele carriers had a 0.30 mmol/liter (95% CI 0.22-0.37) increase in HDL-c compared with homozygous G-allele carriers. CONCLUSIONS: We validate the association of LIPC promoter variation with fasting serum HDL-c and present data supporting an interaction with physical activity implying an increased effect on HDL-c in vigorous physically active subjects carrying the -250 A allele. This interaction may have potential implications for public health and disease prevention.
PubMed ID
18364377 View in PubMed
Less detail

Activation of PPARgamma by metabolites from the flowers of purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99024
Source
J Nat Prod. 2009 May 22;72(5):933-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-22-2009
Author
Kathrine B Christensen
Rasmus K Petersen
Sidsel Petersen
Karsten Kristiansen
Lars P Christensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, University of Aarhus, Kirstinebjergvej 10, 5792 Aarslev, Denmark. kbch@kbm.sdu.dk
Source
J Nat Prod. 2009 May 22;72(5):933-7
Date
May-22-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3T3-L1 Cells
Animals
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Echinacea - chemistry
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Flowers - chemistry
Glucose - metabolism
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Mice
PPAR gamma - drug effects - metabolism
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry
Abstract
Thiazolidinediones are insulin sensitizing drugs that target the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma. An n-hexane extract of the flowers of Echinacea purpurea was found to activate PPARgamma without stimulating adipocyte differentiation. Bioassay-guided fractionations yielded five alkamides, of which one was new, and three fatty acids that all activated PPARgamma. The new alkamide hexadeca-2E,9Z,12Z,14E-tetraenoic acid isobutylamide (5) was identified by analysis of spectroscopic data and found to activate PPARgamma with no concurrent stimulation of adipocyte differentiation. Compound 5 was further shown to increase insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. The data suggest that flowers of E. purpurea contain compounds with potential to manage insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.
PubMed ID
19374389 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adverse effects of psychosocial stress on gonadal function and insulin levels in middle-aged males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11406
Source
J Intern Med. 1995 May;237(5):479-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
P M Nilsson
L. Møller
K. Solstad
Author Affiliation
Health Sciences Centre, University of Lund, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 1995 May;237(5):479-86
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
C-Peptide - blood
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Genitalia, Male - physiopathology
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Stress, Psychological - blood - physiopathology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES. To investigate the relationship between gonadal function, insulin and psychosocial stress in middle-aged men. DESIGN. A population-based, cross-sectional, observational study. SETTING. Glostrup Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. SUBJECTS. Four hundred and thirty-nine males, all aged 51 years. MAIN VARIABLES. Body-mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), insulin, C-peptide, free testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), lipids, fibrinogen, lung function tests (FVC, FEV1, PEF), blood pressure, a self-administered questionnaire with questions on psychosocial variables, lifestyle and self-rated health. RESULTS. Free testosterone correlated inversely (P
PubMed ID
7738488 View in PubMed
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An adult-based insulin resistance genetic risk score associates with insulin resistance, metabolic traits and altered fat distribution in Danish children and adolescents who are overweight or obese.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297400
Source
Diabetologia. 2018 08; 61(8):1769-1779
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2018
Author
Anne-Sofie Graae
Mette Hollensted
Julie T Kloppenborg
Yuvaraj Mahendran
Theresia M Schnurr
Emil Vincent R Appel
Johanne Rask
Tenna R H Nielsen
Mia Ø Johansen
Allan Linneberg
Marit E Jørgensen
Niels Grarup
Haja N Kadarmideen
Birgitte Holst
Oluf Pedersen
Jens-Christian Holm
Torben Hansen
Author Affiliation
Section for Metabolic Receptology, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Diabetologia. 2018 08; 61(8):1769-1779
Date
08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Child
Cholesterol, HDL - metabolism
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Linear Models
Metabolic Syndrome - metabolism
Middle Aged
Overweight - genetics
Pediatric Obesity - genetics
Phenotype
Risk
Abstract
A genetic risk score (GRS) consisting of 53 insulin resistance variants (GRS53) was recently demonstrated to associate with insulin resistance in adults. We speculated that the GRS53 might already associate with insulin resistance during childhood, and we therefore aimed to investigate this in populations of Danish children and adolescents. Furthermore, we aimed to address whether the GRS associates with components of the metabolic syndrome and altered body composition in children and adolescents.
We examined a total of 689 children and adolescents who were overweight or obese and 675 children and adolescents from a population-based study. Anthropometric data, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans, BP, fasting plasma glucose, fasting serum insulin and fasting plasma lipid measurements were obtained, and HOMA-IR was calculated. The GRS53 was examined for association with metabolic traits in children by linear regressions using an additive genetic model.
In overweight/obese children and adolescents, the GRS53 associated with higher HOMA-IR (ß?=?0.109?±?0.050 (SE); p?=?2.73?×?10-2), fasting plasma glucose (ß?=?0.010?±?0.005 mmol/l; p?=?2.51?×?10-2) and systolic BP SD score (ß?=?0.026?±?0.012; p?=?3.32?×?10-2) as well as lower HDL-cholesterol (ß?=?-0.008?±?0.003 mmol/l; p?=?1.23?×?10-3), total fat-mass percentage (ß?=?-0.143?±?0.054%; p?=?9.15?×?10-3) and fat-mass percentage in the legs (ß?=?-0.197?±?0.055%; p?=?4.09?×?10-4). In the population-based sample of children, the GRS53 only associated with lower HDL-cholesterol concentrations (ß?=?-0.007?±?0.003 mmol/l; p?=?1.79?×?10-2).
An adult-based GRS comprising 53 insulin resistance susceptibility SNPs associates with insulin resistance, markers of the metabolic syndrome and altered fat distribution in a sample of Danish children and adolescents who were overweight or obese.
PubMed ID
29855666 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are left ventricular mass, geometry and function related to vascular changes and/or insulin resistance in long-standing hypertension? ICARUS: a LIFE substudy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53541
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2003 May;17(5):305-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
M H Olsen
E. Hjerkinn
K. Wachtell
A. Høieggen
J N Bella
S D Nesbitt
E. Fossum
S E Kjeldsen
S. Julius
H. Ibsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Glostrup University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. mho@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2003 May;17(5):305-11
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Flow Velocity - physiology
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood Pressure - physiology
Carotid Artery, Common - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Denmark
Diastole - physiology
Echocardiography
Female
Heart Ventricles - metabolism - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Humans
Hypertension - metabolism - physiopathology
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - metabolism - physiopathology
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Statistics
Stroke Volume - physiology
Systole - physiology
United States
Vascular Resistance - physiology
Ventricular Function, Left - physiology
Ventricular Remodeling - physiology
Abstract
Vascular hypertrophy and insulin resistance have been associated with abnormal left ventricular (LV) geometry in population studies. We wanted to investigate the influence of vascular hypertrophy and insulin resistance on LV hypertrophy and its function in patients with hypertension. In 89 patients with essential hypertension and electrocardiographic LV hypertrophy, we measured blood pressure; insulin sensitivity by hyperinsulinaemic euglucaemic clamp; minimal forearm vascular resistance (MFVR) by plethysmography; intima-media cross-sectional area of the common carotid arteries (IMA) by ultrasound; and LV mass, relative wall thickness (RWT), systolic function and diastolic filling by echocardiography after two weeks of placebo treatment. LV mass index correlated to IMA/height (r=0.36, P=0.001), serum insulin (r=-0.25, P
Notes
Comment In: J Hum Hypertens. 2003 May;17(5):299-30412756401
PubMed ID
12756402 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of a microsatellite in FASL to type II diabetes and of the FAS-670G>A genotype to insulin resistance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82231
Source
Genes Immun. 2006 Jun;7(4):316-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Nolsøe R L
Hamid Y H
Pociot F.
Paulsen S.
Andersen K M
Borch-Johnsen K.
Drivsholm T.
Hansen T.
Pedersen O.
Mandrup-Poulsen T.
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark.
Source
Genes Immun. 2006 Jun;7(4):316-21
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3' Untranslated Regions - genetics
Adult
Aged
Antigens, CD95
Apoptosis
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - genetics
Fas Ligand Protein
Female
Humans
Insulin Resistance - genetics
Insulin-Secreting Cells - cytology
Male
Membrane Glycoproteins - genetics
Microsatellite Repeats
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Promoter Regions (Genetics) - genetics
Quantitative Trait, Heritable
Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor - genetics
Tumor Necrosis Factors - genetics
Abstract
Type II diabetes is caused by a failure of the pancreatic beta-cells to compensate for insulin resistance leading to hyperglycaemia. There is evidence for an essential role of an increased beta-cell apoptosis in type II diabetes. High glucose concentrations induce IL-1beta production in human beta-cells, Fas expression and concomitant apoptosis owing to a constitutive expression of FasL. FASL and FAS map to loci linked to type II diabetes and estimates of insulin resistance, respectively. We have tested two functional promoter polymorphisms, FAS-670 G>A and FASL-844C>T as well as a microsatellite in the 3' UTR of FASL for association to type II diabetes in 549 type II diabetic patients and 525 normal-glucose-tolerant (NGT) control subjects. Furthermore, we have tested these polymorphisms for association to estimates of beta-cell function and insulin resistance in NGT subjects. We found significant association to type II diabetes for the allele distribution of the FASL microsatellite (P-value 0.02, Bonferroni corrected). The FAS-670G>A was associated with homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index and body mass index (P-values 0.02 and 0.02). We conclude that polymorphisms of FASL and FAS associate with type II diabetes and estimates of insulin resistance in Danish white subjects.
PubMed ID
16691186 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of socioeconomic position with insulin resistance among children from Denmark, Estonia, and Portugal: cross sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29584
Source
BMJ. 2005 Jul 23;331(7510):183
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-23-2005
Author
Debbie A Lawlor
Maarike Harro
Niels Wedderkopp
Lars Bo Andersen
Luis B Sardinha
Chris J Riddoch
Angie S Page
Sigmund A Anderssen
Karsten Froberg
David Stansbie
George Davey Smith
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 2PR. d.a.lawlor@bristol.ac.uk
Source
BMJ. 2005 Jul 23;331(7510):183
Date
Jul-23-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Educational Status
Estonia
Female
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Insulin Resistance
Male
Portugal
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Class
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between socioeconomic position and insulin resistance in children from three countries in northern Europe (Denmark), eastern Europe (Estonia), and southern Europe (Portugal) that have different physical, economic, and cultural environments. DESIGN: Cross sectional study. PARTICIPANTS: 3189 randomly selected schoolchildren aged 9 and 15 years from Denmark (n = 933), Estonia (n = 1103), and Portugal (n = 1153). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Insulin resistance (homoeostasis model assessment). RESULTS: Family income and parental education were inversely associated with insulin resistance in Danish children but were positively associated with insulin resistance in Estonian and Portuguese children. Among Danish children, insulin resistance was 24% lower (95% confidence interval -38% to -10%) in those whose fathers had the most education compared with those with the least education. The equivalent results were 15% (2% to 28%) higher for Estonia and 19% (2% to 36%) higher for Portugal. These associations remained after adjustment for a range of covariates: -20% (-36% to -5%) for Denmark, 10% (-4% to 24%) for Estonia, and 18% (-1% to 31%) for Portugal. Strong statistical evidence supported differences between the associations in Denmark and those in the other two countries in both unadjusted and adjusted models (all P
Notes
Comment In: BMJ. 2005 Jul 23;331(7510):186-716037447
PubMed ID
16037446 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between school meal-induced dietary changes and metabolic syndrome markers in 8-11-year-old Danish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281572
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Aug;55(5):1973-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Camilla T Damsgaard
Christian Ritz
Stine-Mathilde Dalskov
Rikard Landberg
Ken D Stark
Anja Biltoft-Jensen
Inge Tetens
Arne Astrup
Kim F Michaelsen
Lotte Lauritzen
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Aug;55(5):1973-84
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Child
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Cluster analysis
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage - analysis
Docosahexaenoic Acids - blood
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Fishes
Food Services
Fruit
Healthy Diet
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Meals
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood
Schools
Seafood
Treatment Outcome
Triglycerides - blood
Vegetables
Waist Circumference
Abstract
We recently showed that provision of Nordic school meals rich in fish, vegetables and potatoes and with reduced intakes of fat improved blood pressure, insulin resistance assessed by the homeostatic model (HOMA-IR), and plasma triacylglycerol despite increasing waist circumference in Danish 8-11-year-olds. This study explored whether intake or biomarkers of key dietary components in the schools meals were associated with these metabolic syndrome (MetS) markers during the 6-month intervention.
Data from 7-day dietary records and measurements of whole-blood docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), blood pressure, fasting blood MetS markers, waist circumference and android/total fat mass assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months from 523 children were analyzed in linear mixed-effects models adjusted for puberty, growth and fasting.
After adjustment for multiple testing, whole-blood DHA was negatively associated with HOMA-IR (P 
PubMed ID
27084093 View in PubMed
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55 records – page 1 of 6.