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The accuracy of patient records in Swedish nursing homes: congruence of record content and nurses' and patients' descriptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71494
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2001;15(4):303-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
A. Ehrenberg
M. Ehnfors
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. aeh@du.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2001;15(4):303-10
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Education, Nursing, Continuing - standards
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Inservice Training - standards
Male
Nursing Assessment - standards
Nursing Audit
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Homes
Nursing Process - standards
Nursing Records - standards
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The accuracy of patient records in Swedish nursing homes: congruence of record content and nurses' and patients' descriptions. Data from patient records will increasingly be used for care planning, quality assessment, research, health planning and allocation of resources. Knowledge about the accuracy of such secondary data, however, is limited and only a few studies have been conducted on the accuracy of nursing recording. The aim of this study was to analyse the concordance between the nursing documentation in nursing homes and descriptions of some specific problems of nurses and patients. Comparisons were made between wards where nurses had received training in structured recording based on the nursing process (study group) and wards where no intervention had taken place (reference group). Data were collected from the patient records of randomly selected nursing home residents (n=85). The methods used were audits of patient records and structured interviews with residents and nurses. The study revealed considerable deficiencies in the accuracy of the patient records when the records were compared with the reports from nurses and residents. The overall agreement between the interview data from nurses and from the patient records was low. Concordance was better in the study group as compared with the reference group in which the recorded data were structured only following chronological order. The study unequivocally demonstrates that there are major limitations in using records as a data source for the evaluation, planning and development of care.
PubMed ID
12453171 View in PubMed
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Addressing ethical issues in geriatrics and long-term care: ethics education at the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196182
Source
Med Law. 2000;19(3):475-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
M. Gordon
L. Turner
E. Bourret
Author Affiliation
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Med Law. 2000;19(3):475-91
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case Management
Curriculum
Ethics Committees
Ethics, Medical
Geriatrics - education
Health Personnel - education
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Long-Term Care
Models, Educational
Ontario
Organizational Objectives
Patient care team
Program Development
Referral and Consultation - organization & administration
Skilled Nursing Facilities
Abstract
An innovative program in ethics education exists at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. This program can serve as a helpful model for long-term care and geriatric care facilities seeking to implement formal training programs in bioethics. Various aspects of the ethics education program are examined. In addition to describing the role of the ethics committee and research ethics board, consideration is given to case consultations, ethics rounds, the training of junior physicians and medical students, grand rounds and the planning of conferences and guest lectures. With regard to educational content in bioethics, health law, professional guidelines and the principlist approach of Beauchamp and Childress are used to explore the ethical dimensions of particular cases. Given the clinical context of the educational initiatives, the pedagogical approach is predominately case-based. While the bioethics literature emphasizes the patient-physician relationship, ethics education at Baycrest recognizes the importance of multiple professions. Physicians, nurses, social workers, speech pathologists, nutritionists and other health care providers are involved in ethical deliberation and education.
PubMed ID
11143884 View in PubMed
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AIDS, hospice and volunteers. The Casey House volunteer program. A case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221690
Source
J Volunt Adm. 1992;10(4):11-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992

Alaska Youth Initiative: the dream, the reality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35242
Source
J Ment Health Adm. 1995;22(3):293-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
B A Minton
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Alaska Southeast, Juneau 99801, USA.
Source
J Ment Health Adm. 1995;22(3):293-300
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Child
Child Guidance Clinics - organization & administration
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Humans
Inservice training
Organizational Objectives
Patient Care Planning
Power (Psychology)
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Many states have been interested in revising their systems of care for young people. The Alaska Youth Initiative (AYI) attempted to improve the system of care by providing community-based, individualized services to youths who would otherwise be institutionalized outside the state. Major policy changes included emphasis on local service provision, individualized services, unconditional care, and coordination of services. The AYI's performance on its original goals is mixed. Complications in implementation arose from lack of provider training, conflict over coordination at the state level, and difficulty in individualizing programs. Although significant successes have occurred, administrators could improve the implementation of similar types of programs by making specific plans to address concerns of various stakeholders, providing fiscal incentives for cooperation for state workers, and providing ongoing training in both clinical and administrative areas.
PubMed ID
10144464 View in PubMed
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Alberta: evaluation of nursing retention and recruitment programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126341
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:130-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Arlene Weidner
Carol Graham
Jennifer Smith
Julia Aitken
Jill Odell
Author Affiliation
Research to Action Project, Calgary, AB.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:130-47
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Burnout, Professional - nursing - prevention & control
Data Collection
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Mentors
Middle Aged
Nursing Evaluation Research - organization & administration
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection - statistics & numerical data
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Quality Improvement - organization & administration
Retirement
Retrospective Studies
Work Schedule Tolerance
Workplace
Abstract
Retention and recruitment strategies are essential to address nursing workforce supply and ensure the viability of healthcare delivery in Canada. Knowledge transfer between experienced nurses and those new to the profession is also a focus for concern. The Multi-Employer/United Nurses of Alberta Joint Committee attempted to address these issues by introducing a number of retention and recruitment (R&R) initiatives for nurses in Alberta: in total, seven different programs that were introduced to some 24,000 nurses and employers across the province of Alberta in 2001 (the Transitional Graduate Nurse Recruitment Program) and 2007 (the remaining six R&R programs). Approximately 1,600 nurses participated in the seven programs between 2001 and 2009. Of the seven strategies, one supported entry into the workplace, two were pre-retirement strategies and four involved flexible work options. This project entailed a retrospective evaluation of the seven programs and differed from the other Research to Action (RTA) projects because it was solely concerned with evaluation of pre-existing initiatives. All seven programs were launched without a formal evaluation component, and the tracking of local uptake varied throughout the province. The union and various employers faced challenges in implementing these strategies in a timely fashion, as most were designed at the bargaining table during negotiations. As a result, systems, policy and procedural changes had to be developed to support their implementation after they became available.Participants in the programs indicated improvements over time in several areas, including higher levels of satisfaction with work–life balance, hours worked and their current practice and profession. The evaluation found that participation led to perceived improvements in nurses' confidence, greater control over their work environment, decreased stress levels, increased energy and morale and perceived improved ability to provide high-quality care. However, no formal implementation plan had been developed or made available to assist employers with implementation of the programs. The findings highlight the need for more discipline in communicating, implementing and evaluating initiatives such as those evaluated retrospectively in this project. In particular, key performance indicators, baseline data, monitoring mechanisms and an evaluation plan need to be developed prior to implementation.
PubMed ID
22398489 View in PubMed
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An educational intervention for district nurses: use of electronic records in leg ulcer management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78585
Source
J Wound Care. 2007 Jan;16(1):29-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Lagerin A.
Nilsson G.
Törnkvist L.
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Centre for Family and Community Medicine (CeFAM), Huddinge, Sweden. Annica.Lagerin@sll.se
Source
J Wound Care. 2007 Jan;16(1):29-32
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Clinical Competence - standards
Data Collection - methods
Documentation
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Leg Ulcer - nursing - ultrasonography
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - utilization
Middle Aged
Nursing Assessment - methods
Nursing Audit - methods
Nursing Education Research - methods
Nursing Evaluation Research - methods
Nursing Records
Program Evaluation
Public Health Nursing - education - organization & administration
Skin Care - nursing
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate district nurses' management of leg ulcer patients and the effects of an in-service education programme led by district nurses as local educators at primary health-care centres. METHOD: Data were collected from electronic patient records (EPRs), both before and after the educational intervention. Nineteen district nurses undertook a one-day course focusing on four themes: Doppler assessment and measurement of ankle brachial pressure index; compression treatment; patient education; nursing documentation. Fourteen acted as in-service educators; 12 educators completed the intervention.The EPRs were scrutinised with an audit tool. RESULTS: The documentation on the selected key areas for the management of patients with leg ulcers was generally sparse, although the educational intervention resulted in statistically significant effects on documentation in three areas. CONCLUSION: Further improvements in care are necessary, as are qualitative and quantitative studies to explore the large discrepancies between guidelines and everyday clinical practice in this field.
PubMed ID
17334143 View in PubMed
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An educational intervention to enhance nurse leaders' perceptions of patient safety culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173724
Source
Health Serv Res. 2005 Aug;40(4):997-1020
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Liane Ginsburg
Peter G Norton
Ann Casebeer
Steven Lewis
Author Affiliation
School of Health Policy and Management, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Health Serv Res. 2005 Aug;40(4):997-1020
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Inservice training
Leadership
Male
Medical Errors - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration
Organizational Culture
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods
Regression Analysis
Safety Management - organization & administration
Abstract
To design a training intervention and then test its effect on nurse leaders' perceptions of patient safety culture.
Three hundred and fifty-six nurses in clinical leadership roles (nurse managers and educators/CNSs) in two Canadian multi-site teaching hospitals (study and control).
A prospective evaluation of a patient safety training intervention using a quasi-experimental untreated control group design with pretest and posttest. Nurses in clinical leadership roles in the study group were invited to participate in two patient safety workshops over a 6-month period. Individuals in the study and control groups completed surveys measuring patient safety culture and leadership for improvement prior to training and 4 months following the second workshop.
Individual nurse clinical leaders were the unit of analysis. Exploratory factor analysis of the safety culture items was conducted; repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired t-tests were used to evaluate the effect of the training intervention on perceived safety culture (three factors). Hierarchical regression analyses looked at the influence of demographics, leadership for improvement, and the training intervention on nurse leaders' perceptions of safety culture.
A statistically significant improvement in one of three safety culture measures was shown for the study group (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
16033489 View in PubMed
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462 records – page 1 of 47.