Skip header and navigation

Refine By

39 records – page 1 of 4.

Acute illness associated with use of pest strips - seven U.S. States and Canada, 2000-2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105281
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2014 Jan 17;63(2):42-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-17-2014
Author
Rebecca J Tsai
Jennifer Sievert
Joanne Prado
Kaci Buhl
Dave L Stone
Mathias Forrester
Shelia Higgins
Yvette Mitchell
Abby Schwartz
Geoffrey M Calvert
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2014 Jan 17;63(2):42-3
Date
Jan-17-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Dichlorvos - toxicity
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Insect Control - methods
Insecticides - toxicity
Male
Middle Aged
Product Labeling
United States - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Dichlorvos-impregnated resin strips (DDVP pest strips) are among the few organophosphate products still available for indoor residential use. The residential uses for most other organophosphate products, including most DDVP products, were canceled because they posed unreasonable risks to children. DDVP pest strips act by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain and nerves of insect pests and are designed to gradually release DDVP vapor for up to 4 months. Acute illnesses in humans associated with nonlethal acute exposures usually resolve completely, but recovery is not always rapid. To assess the frequency of acute illnesses associated with DDVP pest strips, cases from 2000 through June 2013 were sought from the 12 states that participate in the Sentinel Event Notification System for Occupational Risks (SENSOR)-Pesticides Program, the National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC), and Health Canada.* A total of 31 acute DDVP pest strip-related illness cases were identified in seven U.S. states and Canada. The majority of these illnesses resulted from use of the product in commonly occupied living areas (e.g., kitchens and bedrooms), in violation of label directions. Although 26 of the 31 cases involved mild health effects of short duration, five persons had moderate health effects. Illnesses caused by excess exposure to DDVP pest strips can be reduced by educating the public about the proper usage of DDVP pest strips and with improvements in label directions.
PubMed ID
24430101 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aerial spraying of fenitrothion in forest programs: some problems and some solutions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243052
Source
Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 1982 Jul;60(7):1046-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1982
Author
D J Ecobichon
Source
Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 1982 Jul;60(7):1046-52
Date
Jul-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerosols
Animals
Canada
Environmental pollution - prevention & control
Female
Fenitrothion - toxicity
Humans
Insect control
Lung - metabolism
Male
Rats
Trees
Abstract
Annually, large tracts of forest in eastern Canada are sprayed aerially with insecticides (fenitrothion, aminocarb) in attempts to control an epidemic infestation by an indigenous forest pest, the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana, Clemens). The massive size of the spraying programs, the anecdotal reports of human exposure, and the potential for hazard to human health have led one province. New Brunswick, to initiate and fund specific environmental and laboratory studies which will provide adequate data upon which the government can base realistic legislation to protect both the forests and the population. These studies have included some unique field analyses of aerial spray drift conducted by a research group from the National Research Council; comparative subchronic studies in rats of fenitrothion and a new formulation; a nose-only inhalation study of this formulation in rats; field testing of the formulation for drift characteristics. Ongoing research involves the subchronic testing of the emulsifying agents being used routinely in the new formulation and studies of a low-drift additive which will stabilize the particle size of the spray. On the basis of the results to date, the government has been able to modify spraying techniques and to establish realistic buffer zones around human habitation.
PubMed ID
7127208 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A possibility of using some pyrethroids to prevent plague in the Siberian natural foci of the souslik type]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98197
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2009 Oct-Dec;(4):42-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
A Ia Nikitin
A I Kardash
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2009 Oct-Dec;(4):42-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Reservoirs - microbiology
Fleas - drug effects - microbiology
Insect Control - methods
Insect Vectors - drug effects
Insecticides - pharmacology
Nitriles - pharmacology
Plague - prevention & control
Pyrethrins - pharmacology
Sciuridae - microbiology
Siberia
Abstract
Experiments have established that the pyrethroids deltamethrin and cypermethrin (decis and cimbush) may be used in the Siberian natural plague foci for not only emergency, but also early prevention of plague. This substantially expands and simplifies the possibility of organizing disinfection actions and reduces the cost of treatments. The findings are determined by the specific features of the biology and ecology of fleas inhabiting in the natural plague foci of the souslik type in a continental climate area. The specific features include the coincidence of preimago stages and the larger proportion of an adults to rodent nests; the low migration of imagoes from the inhabiting nests to the ground surface, only one insect generation that can develop within a comparatively short (4-5-month) warm period of a year.
PubMed ID
20120377 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A tularemia focus in the delta of the Volga and measures to liquidate it].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111546
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1967;44(3):90-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1967

[Basic principles in protecting workers and population of the Baikal-Amur Railroad area from ixodid ticks and blood-sucking flies].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238582
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1985 Jul-Aug;(4):64-7
Publication Type
Article

Bed bug infestations in an urban environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175260
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2005 Apr;11(4):533-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Stephen W Hwang
Tomislav J Svoboda
Iain J De Jong
Karl J Kabasele
Evie Gogosis
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research on Inner City Health, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. hwangs@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2005 Apr;11(4):533-8
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bedbugs
Housing - standards
Humans
Insect Control - methods
Ontario
Public Health - standards
Urban health
Abstract
Until recently, bed bugs have been considered uncommon in the industrialized world. This study determined the extent of reemerging bed bug infestations in homeless shelters and other locations in Toronto, Canada. Toronto Public Health documented complaints of bed bug infestations from 46 locations in 2003, most commonly apartments (63%), shelters (15%), and rooming houses (11%). Pest control operators in Toronto (N = 34) reported treating bed bug infestations at 847 locations in 2003, most commonly single-family dwellings (70%), apartments (18%), and shelters (8%). Bed bug infestations were reported at 20 (31%) of 65 homeless shelters. At 1 affected shelter, 4% of residents reported having bed bug bites. Bed bug infestations can have an adverse effect on health and quality of life in the general population, particularly among homeless persons living in shelters.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1994 Mar 26;343(8900):761-37907732
Cites: S Afr Med J. 1991 Mar 16;79(6):320-22017742
Cites: Clin Exp Dermatol. 1999 May;24(3):241-210354190
Cites: BMJ. 2000 Apr 22;320(7242):114110775230
Cites: Cutis. 2000 May;65(5):262-410826083
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2001 Jul;96(7):2194-811467652
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Aug 15;347(7):505-1612181406
Cites: West Afr J Med. 2002 Oct-Dec;21(4):268-7112665260
Cites: S Afr Med J. 1978 Apr 15;53(15):598-600675426
Cites: S Afr Med J. 1979 Jul 14;56(2):54-7573506
Cites: S Afr Med J. 1983 Jan 15;63(3):77-816849170
Cites: Lancet. 1986 Jul 5;2(8497):452873343
Cites: Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 1986;80(4):653-83810799
Cites: AIDS. 1987 Sep;1(3):171-42450552
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1989 Dec;160(6):970-72479697
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Jan 21;340(3):184-99895398
PubMed ID
15829190 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bed bugs and public health: new approaches for an old scourge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114434
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Nov-Dec;103(6):e399-403
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mona Shum
Elizabeth Comack
Taz Stuart
Reg Ayre
Stéphane Perron
Shelley A Beaudet
Tom Kosatsky
Author Affiliation
National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health, Vancouver, BC. mona.shum@bccdc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Nov-Dec;103(6):e399-403
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bedbugs
Canada
Congresses as topic
Ectoparasitic Infestations - prevention & control
Humans
Insect Control - methods
Professional Role
Public Health Practice
Abstract
To share four Canadian cities' experiences with bed bug infestations and to explore public health roles in managing them.
We summarize presentations from a workshop at the 2010 Canadian Public Health Association Conference which examined the re-emergence of bed bugs in Canada and compared management approaches of municipal and public health authorities in four large Canadian cities. We include updates on their activities since the workshop.
Cities across Canada have observed an increase in complaints of bed bug infestations over recent years. Toronto Public Health considers bed bugs to be a threat to health and has been heavily involved in the front-line response to bed bug complaints. In Winnipeg, Montreal and Vancouver, city inspectors are responsible for investigating complaints, and public health plays a supporting or secondary role. We identified factors that may contribute to successful management of bed bugs: sufficient funding, partnerships among many stakeholders, training and education, and surveillance and evaluation.
Various public health agencies in Canadian cities have played key roles in the fight against bed bugs through new initiatives, education, and encouragement and support for others. By working with the public, owners, tenants, the health sector and other stakeholders, public health practitioners can begin to curb the resurgence of bed bugs and the social strains associated with them.
PubMed ID
23618015 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chemical management of forest pest epidemics: a case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229015
Source
Biomed Environ Sci. 1990 Jun;3(2):217-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
D J Ecobichon
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Biomed Environ Sci. 1990 Jun;3(2):217-39
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Carbamates - adverse effects
Environmental health
Fenitrothion - adverse effects
Humans
Insect Control - methods
Insecticides - adverse effects
New Brunswick
Phenylcarbamates
Trees
Abstract
The management of insect epidemics in large tracts of forest is difficult given the climatic conditions encountered, the topography of the forested land, the nature of the forest, the types of chemical and/or biological insecticides registered for use, and the technologies available for insecticide application. Since 1952, the province of New Brunswick, Canada, has been heavily involved in attempting to control an epidemic of the eastern spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana. Clemens) that has ravaged the coniferous softwoods of eastern Canada and the United States. Of the available options, the provincial government chose to develop an aerial spraying program, eventually selecting two chemical insecticides (fenitrothion and aminocarb) and one biological control agent (Bacillus thuringiensis). Concerns about possible impacts on human health led to extensive studies of the toxicology of these insecticides, the technology of aerial spraying, the development of less hazardous formulations, and the quantitation of off-target drift of aerosolized insecticides. These studies culminated in improvements in pesticide application and the establishment of regulations on safety or buffer zones around human habitation for certain types of aircraft applying different formulations of the insecticides.
PubMed ID
2099793 View in PubMed
Less detail

39 records – page 1 of 4.