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22 records – page 1 of 3.

[Assessment of epidemic manifestations of the West Nile fever in the Volgograd region depending on the climatic conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263064
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2014;59(6):42-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
V A Safronov
V Ju Smolenskij
V P Smeljanskij
S T Savchenko
A S Razdorskij
V P Toporkov
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2014;59(6):42-6
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Climate
Culicidae - virology
Epidemics
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Incidence
Insect Vectors - virology
Russia - epidemiology
Temperature
West Nile Fever - epidemiology - transmission - virology
West Nile virus - physiology
Abstract
Results of the analysis of the increase in the incidence of epidemic of the West Nile fever and climate conditions in the Volgograd region were presented. Certain seasonal periods and threshold values of temperature and humidity statistically associated with the epidemic rise were identified. The discussion of the probable mechanisms of indirect effects of atmospheric heat on the elements of the epidemic process was carried out.
PubMed ID
25929037 View in PubMed
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A Comparison of Dynamics in Two Models for the Spread of a Vector-Borne Disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278841
Source
Transbound Emerg Dis. 2016 Apr;63(2):215-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
K. Graesbøll
T. Sumner
C. Enøe
L E Christiansen
S. Gubbins
Source
Transbound Emerg Dis. 2016 Apr;63(2):215-23
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bluetongue - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Bluetongue virus - immunology - isolation & purification
Cattle
Ceratopogonidae - virology
Denmark - epidemiology
Insect Vectors - virology
Models, Theoretical
Sheep
United Kingdom - epidemiology
Vaccination - veterinary
Abstract
In 2007, bluetongue virus (BTV) was introduced to both Denmark (DK) and the United Kingdom (UK). For this reason, simulation models were built to predict scenarios for future incursions. The DK and UK models have a common description of within-herd dynamics, but differ greatly in their descriptions of between-herd spread, one using an explicit representation of vector dispersal, the other a transmission kernel. Here, we compare model predictions for the dynamics of bluetongue in the UK, based on the 2007 incursion and vaccination rollout in 2008. We demonstrate how an agent-based model shows greater sensitivity to the level of vaccine uptake and has lower variability compared with a kernel-based model. However, a model using a transmission kernel requires less detailed data and is often faster.
PubMed ID
25056842 View in PubMed
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Complete coding sequence and molecular epidemiological analysis of Sindbis virus isolates from mosquitoes and humans, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123919
Source
J Gen Virol. 2012 Sep;93(Pt 9):1984-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Sane J
Kurkela S
Putkuri N
Huhtamo E
Vaheri A
Vapalahti O
Author Affiliation
Infection Biology Research Program, Department of Virology, Haartman Institute, Faculty of Medicine, PO Box 21, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. jussi.sane@helsinki.fi
Source
J Gen Virol. 2012 Sep;93(Pt 9):1984-90
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alphavirus Infections - epidemiology - virology
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Cell Line
Culicidae - virology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Insect Vectors - virology
Molecular Sequence Data
Open Reading Frames
Phylogeny
Sindbis Virus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
Sindbis virus (SINV) is an arthropod-borne alphavirus, which causes rash-arthritis, particularly in Finland. SINV is transmitted by mosquitoes in Finland but thus far no virus has been isolated from mosquitoes. In this study, we report the isolation of the first SINV strain from mosquitoes in Finland and its full-length protein-coding sequence. We furthermore describe the full-length coding sequence of six SINV strains previously isolated from humans in Finland and from a mosquito in Russia. The strain isolated from mosquitoes (Ilomantsi-2005M) was very closely related to all the other Northern European SINV strains. We found 9 aa positions, of which five in the nsP3 protein C terminus, to be distinctive signatures for the Northern European strains that may be associated with vector or host species adaptation. Phylogenetic analyses further indicate that SINV has a local circulation in endemic regions in Northern Europe and no novel strains are frequently being introduced.
PubMed ID
22647374 View in PubMed
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[Complete genome analysis of the Batai virus (BATV) and the new Anadyr virus (ANADV) of the Bunyamwera group (Bunyaviridae, Orthobunyavirus) isolated in Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263065
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2014;59(6):16-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
A M Shchetinin
D K Lvov
S V Alkhovsky
M Yu Shchelkanov
V A Aristova
T N Morozova
A K Gitelman
P G Deryabin
A G Botikov
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2014;59(6):16-22
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aedes - virology
Animals
Base Sequence
Birds - virology
Brain - virology
Bunyamwera virus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Bunyaviridae Infections - epidemiology - veterinary - virology
Cercopithecus aethiops - virology
Genome, Viral
Genotype
Glycosylation
Insect Vectors - virology
Mice
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Russia - epidemiology
Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid
Vero Cells
Viral Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
Almost complete nucleotide sequences for the S, M, and L segments were obtained for three strains of the Batai virus (Bunyamwera serogroup, genus Orthobunyavirus, Bunyaviridae family). Based on the results of the phylogenetic analysis conducted forthe three genomic segments LEIV Ast507 and LEIV-Ast528 strains were grouped with other European BATV isolates and were found to be almost identical to the strain 42 isolated from Volgograd Region, Russia, 2003. Surprisingly, LEIV-13395 strain isolated from the Aedes sp. mosquitos in Magadan Oblast, 1987, turned out to be a novel genotype inside Bunyamwera serogroup. The highest nucleotide identity levels of LEIV-13395 genomicsegments (86.9%, 80.8%, 79.7% for S, M and L segments respectively) were observed with corresponding segments of the Batai virus.
PubMed ID
25929031 View in PubMed
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The contribution of Culex pipiens complex mosquitoes to transmission and persistence of West Nile virus in North America.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116403
Source
J Am Mosq Control Assoc. 2012 Dec;28(4 Suppl):137-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Theodore G Andreadis
Author Affiliation
Center for Vector Biology & Zoonotic Diseases, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, 123 Huntington Street, New Haven, CT 06511, USA.
Source
J Am Mosq Control Assoc. 2012 Dec;28(4 Suppl):137-51
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Culex - virology
Humans
Insect Vectors - virology
Seasons
Species Specificity
United States - epidemiology
West Nile Fever - epidemiology - transmission
West Nile virus - physiology
Abstract
Mosquitoes within the Culex pipiens complex have been implicated as major vectors of West Nile virus (WNV) in North America due to their seasonal abundance, vector competence and high field infection rates. However, the role of Cx. p. pipiens complex mosquitoes in enzootic amplification of WNV among avian hosts and epidemic transmission to humans varies throughout its geographical distribution. In the northeastern United States, Cx. p. pipiens is recognized as the primary enzootic vector responsible for amplification of virus among wild bird populations. However, because this mosquito is strongly ornithophilic, its role in transmission to humans appears to be more limited in this region. In the north central and Mid-Atlantic States by contrast, Cx. p. pipiens shows an increased affinity for human hosts and has been incriminated as a key bridge vector. In southern regions of the United States, Culex p. quinquefasciatus are more opportunistic feeders, and are thought to be principal enzootic and epidemic vectors. In western regions of the United States where Culex tarsalis predominates, especially in rural areas, Cx. p. pipiens and Cx. p. quinquefasciatus play roles that are more limited and are recognized as secondary vectors. In the southwestern United States Cx. p. quinquefasciatus also appears to be the predominant vector in urban habitats, but only a secondary vector in more rural environs. The direct involvement of Cx. p. pipiens form molestus in WNV transmission is largely unknown, but human-biting Cx. p. pipiens are more likely to have a probability of genetic ancestry with Cx. p. pipiens form molestus. The detection of WNV from overwintering populations of diapausing Cx. p. pipiens and non-diapausing Cx. p. quinquefaciatus and their role in local overwintering of WNV are addressed.
PubMed ID
23401954 View in PubMed
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Culex torrentium Mosquito Role as Major Enzootic Vector Defined by Rate of Sindbis Virus Infection, Sweden, 2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269258
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2015 May;21(5):875-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Jenny C Hesson
Jenny Verner-Carlsson
Anders Larsson
Raija Ahmed
Åke Lundkvist
Jan O Lundström
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2015 May;21(5):875-8
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alphavirus Infections - epidemiology - history - transmission - virology
Animals
Culex - virology
Female
Genes, Viral
History, 21st Century
Humans
Insect Vectors - virology
Phylogeny
RNA, Viral
Sindbis Virus - classification - genetics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We isolated Sindbis virus (SINV) from the enzootic mosquito vectors Culex torrentium, Cx. pipiens, and Culiseta morsitans collected in an area of Sweden where SINV disease is endemic. The infection rate in Cx. torrentium mosquitoes was exceptionally high (36 infections/1,000 mosquitoes), defining Cx. torrentium as the main enzootic vector of SINV in Scandinavia.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25898013 View in PubMed
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Culicoides biting midges (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae) in various climatic zones of Russia and adjacent lands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264604
Source
J Vector Ecol. 2014 Dec;39(2):306-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
A V Sprygin
O A Fiodorova
Yu Yu Babin
N P Elatkin
B. Mathieu
M E England
A V Kononov
Source
J Vector Ecol. 2014 Dec;39(2):306-15
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bluetongue virus - pathogenicity
Diptera - virology
Insect Vectors - virology
Russia
Seasons
Abstract
Culicoides biting midges play an important role in the epidemiology of many vector-borne infections, including bluetongue virus, an internationally important virus of ruminants. The territory of the Russian Federation includes regions with diverse climatic conditions and a wide range of habitats suitable for Culicoides. This review summarizes available data on Culicoides studied in the Russian Federation covering geographically different regions, as well as findings from adjacent countries. Previous literature on species composition, ranges of dominant species, breeding sites, and host preferences is reviewed and suggestions made for future studies to elucidate vector-virus relationships.
PubMed ID
25424259 View in PubMed
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Culicoids as vectors of Schmallenberg virus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123330
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2012 Jul;18(7):1204-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Lasse Dam Rasmussen
Birgit Kristensen
Carsten Kirkeby
Thomas Bruun Rasmussen
Graham J Belsham
René Bødker
Anette Bøtner
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2012 Jul;18(7):1204-6
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bunyaviridae Infections - transmission - veterinary - virology
Ceratopogonidae - virology
Denmark
Humans
Insect Vectors - virology
Orthobunyavirus - genetics - isolation & purification
Sheep
Sheep Diseases - transmission - virology
Notes
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PubMed ID
22709978 View in PubMed
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Detection of Sindbis and Inkoo Virus RNA in Genetically Typed Mosquito Larvae Sampled in Northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283721
Source
Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2016 Jul;16(7):461-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Olov Tingström
Olivia Wesula Lwande
Jonas Näslund
Iris Spyckerelle
Cecilia Engdahl
Pontus Von Schoenberg
Clas Ahlm
Magnus Evander
Göran Bucht
Source
Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2016 Jul;16(7):461-7
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Culicidae - genetics - virology
Insect Vectors - virology
Larva - genetics
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
RNA, Viral - isolation & purification
Sindbis Virus - isolation & purification
Sweden
Abstract
Mosquito-borne viruses have a widespread distribution across the globe and are known to pose serious threats to human and animal health. The maintenance and dissemination of these viruses in nature are driven through horizontal and vertical transmission. In the temperate climate of northern Sweden, there is a dearth of knowledge on whether mosquito-borne viruses that occur are transmitted transovarially. To gain a better understanding of mosquito-borne virus circulation and maintenance, mosquito larvae were sampled in northern Sweden during the first and second year after a large outbreak of Ockelbo disease in 2013 caused by Sindbis virus (SINV).
A total of 3123 larvae were sampled during the summers of 2014 and 2015 at multiple sites in northern Sweden. The larvae were homogenized and screened for viruses using RT-PCR and sequencing. Species identification of selected larvae was performed by genetic barcoding targeting the cytochrome C oxidase subunit I gene.
SINV RNA was detected in mosquito larvae of three different species, Ochlerotatus (Oc.) communis, Oc. punctor, and Oc. diantaeus. Inkoo virus (INKV) RNA was detected in Oc. communis larvae. This finding suggested that these mosquitoes could support transovarial transmission of SINV and INKV. Detection of virus in mosquito larva may serve as an early warning for emerging arboviral diseases and add information to epidemiological investigations before, during, and after outbreaks. Furthermore, our results demonstrated the relevance of genetic barcoding as an attractive and effective method for mosquito larva typing. However, further mosquito transmission studies are needed to ascertain the possible role of different mosquito species and developmental stages in the transmission cycle of arboviruses.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27159120 View in PubMed
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Establishment of the West Nile virus vector, Culex modestus, in a residential area in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264605
Source
J Vector Ecol. 2014 Dec;39(2):1-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014

22 records – page 1 of 3.