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203 records – page 1 of 21.

A 2-year entomological study of potential malaria vectors in central Italy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150651
Source
Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2009 Dec;9(6):703-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Marco Di Luca
Daniela Boccolini
Francesco Severini
Luciano Toma
Francesca Mancini Barbieri
Antonio Massa
Roberto Romi
Author Affiliation
Vector Borne Diseases and International Health Section, Department of Infectious, Parasitic, and Immuno-Mediated Diseases, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy. marco.diluca@iss.it
Source
Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2009 Dec;9(6):703-11
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anopheles - genetics - parasitology - physiology
Culicidae - growth & development
Databases, Nucleic Acid
Ecosystem
Entomology
Female
Geography
Humans
Insect Vectors - genetics - parasitology - physiology
Italy
Longitudinal Studies
Malaria - parasitology - transmission
Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Population Density
Abstract
Europe was officially declared free from malaria in 1975; nevertheless, this disease remains a potential problem related to the presence of former vectors, belonging to the Anopheles maculipennis complex. Autochthonous-introduced malaria cases, recently reported in European countries, together with the predicted climatic and environmental changes, have increased the concern of health authorities over the possible resurgence of this disease in the Mediterranean Basin. In Italy, to study the distribution and bionomics of indigenous anopheline populations and to assess environmental parameters that could influence their dynamics, an entomological study was carried out in 2005-2006 in an at-risk study area. This model area is represented by the geographical region named the Maremma, a Tyrrhenian costal plain in Central Italy, where malaria was hyperendemic up to the 1950s. Fortnightly, entomological surveys (April-October) were carried out in four selected sites with different ecological features. Morphological and molecular characterization, blood meal identification, and parity rate assessment of the anophelines were performed. In total, 8274 mosquitoes were collected, 7691 of which were anophelines. Six Anopheles species were recorded, the most abundant of which were Anopheles labranchiae and An. maculipennis s.s. An. labranchiae is predominant in the coastal plain, where it is present in scattered foci. However, this species exhibits a wider than expected range: in fact it has been recorded, for the first time, inland where An. maculipennis s.s. is the most abundant species. Both species fed on a wide range of animal hosts, also showing a marked aggressiveness on humans, when available. Our findings demonstrated the high receptivity of the Maremma area, where the former malaria vector, An. labranchiae, occurs at different densities related to the kind of environment, climatic parameters, and anthropic activities.
PubMed ID
19485768 View in PubMed
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Aedes albopictus in northeast Mexico: an update on adult distribution and first report of parasitism by Ascogregarina taiwanensis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106208
Source
J Vector Borne Dis. 2013 Sep;50(3):202-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Filiberto Reyes-Villanueva
Javier A Garza-Hernande
Alberto M Garcia-Munguia
Annabel F V Howard
Aldo I Ortega-Morales
Monsuru A Adeleke
Mario A Rodriguez-Perez
Author Affiliation
Laboratorio de Biomedicina Molecular, Centro de Biotecnología Genómica, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Tamaulipas, México, .
Source
J Vector Borne Dis. 2013 Sep;50(3):202-5
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aedes - classification - parasitology - physiology
Animals
Apicomplexa - physiology
Data Collection
Dengue - transmission
Female
Geography
Host-Parasite Interactions
Humans
Insect Vectors - classification - parasitology - physiology
Larva
Mexico - epidemiology
Population Dynamics
Protozoan Infections - epidemiology - transmission
Seasons
Species Specificity
Abstract
Aedes albopictus has been known as efficient vector of dengue in Asian countries and its wide displacement of Ae. aegypti has been documented in many parts of the world. The present survey was carried out to update the distribution of Ae. albopictus in northeast Mexico and to report the first record of parasitism of mosquitoes by Ascogregarina taiwanensis in Mexico.
Human landing collections were conducted in the month of May every year between 2007 and 2009 across the three states, Nuevo Leon (NL), Tamaulipas and Coahuila in northeast Mexico. Six human bait collections were also organized at the cemetery of Gomez Farias (GF), a village in southern Tamaulipas during the rainy and dry seasons in 2010. Aedes albopictus caught in 2010 were dissected for parasitic protozoan gregarines.
The results of human landing collections carried out during 2007-10 across the three states of northeast zone of Mexico revealed that Ae. albopictus is invading along the route between Monterrey City in NL and Tampico, Tamaulipas, but not into the arid state of Coahuila. Aedes albopictus was recorded in nine new municipalities in addition to the 15 municipalities reported before 2005. Furthermore, six human-bait collections performed during the dry and rainy seasons in 2010 at the cemetery of GF suggest the exclusion of Ae. aegypti on that site. Dominance was shared by Ae. quadrivittatus, another container-inhabitant but indigenous species, and Ae. albopictus during the dry and rainy seasons, respectively. The results of dissection of the mosquitoes for gregarines revealed the parasitism of Ae. albopictus by A. taiwanensis.
The results of this study showed that Ae. albopictus has spread to all the municipalities in the northeastern Mexico except the arid area and reported the first record of parasitic protozoan A. taiwanensis in Mexico. We recommend further studies on larval and adult populations of natural container-occupant mosquitoes in northeastern Mexico in order to have a better documentation of the impact of Ae. albopictus upon the indigenous species community, and its epidemiological role in dengue transmission.
PubMed ID
24220079 View in PubMed
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Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti in the continental United States: a vector at the cool margin of its geographic range.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112750
Source
J Med Entomol. 2013 May;50(3):467-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Lars Eisen
Chester G Moore
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, Colorado State University, 3195 Rampart Road, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. lars.eisen@colostate.edu
Source
J Med Entomol. 2013 May;50(3):467-78
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aedes - growth & development - physiology - virology
Animals
Climate change
Dengue - epidemiology - history - transmission - virology
Dengue Virus - physiology
Disease Outbreaks - history
Environment
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Insect Vectors - growth & development - physiology - virology
Larva - growth & development - physiology
Temperature
United States - epidemiology
Yellow Fever - epidemiology - history - transmission - virology
Yellow fever virus - physiology
Abstract
After more than a half century without recognized local dengue outbreaks in the continental United States, there were recent outbreaks of autochthonous dengue in the southern parts of Texas (2004-2005) and Florida (2009-2011). This dengue reemergence has provoked interest in the extent of the future threat posed by the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (L.), the primary vector of dengue and yellow fever viruses in urban settings, to human health in the continental United States. Ae. aegypti is an intriguing example of a vector species that not only occurs in the southernmost portions of the eastern United States today but also is incriminated as the likely primary vector in historical outbreaks of yellow fever as far north as New York, Philadelphia, and Boston, from the 1690s to the 1820s. For vector species with geographic ranges limited, in part, by low temperature and cool range margins occurring in the southern part of the continental United States, as is currently the case for Ae. aegypti, it is tempting to speculate that climate warming may result in a northward range expansion (similar to that seen for Ixodes tick vectors of Lyme borreliosis spirochetes in Scandinavia and southern Canada in recent decades). Although there is no doubt that climate conditions directly impact many aspects of the life history of Ae. aegypti, this mosquito also is closely linked to the human environment and directly influenced by the availability of water-holding containers for oviposition and larval development. Competition with other container-inhabiting mosquito species, particularly Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Skuse), also may impact the presence and local abundance of Ae. aegypti. Field-based studies that focus solely on the impact of weather or climate factors on the presence and abundance of Ae. aegypti, including assessments of the potential impact of climate warming on the mosquito's future range and abundance, do not consider the potential confounding effects of socioeconomic factors or biological competitors for establishment and proliferation of Ae. aegypti. The results of such studies therefore should not be assumed to apply in areas with different socioeconomic conditions or composition of container-inhabiting mosquito species. For example, results from field-based studies at the high altitude cool margins for Ae. aegypti in Mexico's central highlands or the Andes in South America cannot be assumed to be directly applicable to geographic areas in the United States with comparable climate conditions. Unfortunately, we have a very poor understanding of how climatic drivers interact with the human landscape and biological competitors to impact establishment and proliferation of Ae. aegypti at the cool margin of its range in the continental United States. A first step toward assessing the future threat this mosquito poses to human health in the continental United States is to design and conduct studies across strategic climatic and socioeconomic gradients in the United States (including the U.S.-Mexico border area) to determine the permissiveness of the coupled natural and human environment for Ae. aegypti at the present time. This approach will require experimental studies and field surveys that focus specifically on climate conditions relevant to the continental United States. These studies also must include assessments of how the human landscape, particularly the impact of availability of larval developmental sites and the permissiveness of homes for mosquito intrusion, and the presence of other container-inhabiting mosquitoes that may compete with Ae. aegypti for larval habitat affects the ability of Ae. aegypti to establish and proliferate. Until we are armed with such knowledge, it is not possible to meaningfully assess the potential for climate warming to impact the proliferation potential for Ae. aegypti in the United States outside of the geographic areas where the mosquito already is firmly established, and even less so for dengue virus transmission and dengue disease in humans.
PubMed ID
23802440 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of recent data on a fauna and ranges of malaria mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae: Anopheles) from the territory of Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183507
Source
Parazitologiia. 2003 Jul-Aug;37(4):298-305
Publication Type
Article
Author
R M Gornostaeva
Source
Parazitologiia. 2003 Jul-Aug;37(4):298-305
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anopheles - classification
Biodiversity
Humans
Insect Vectors - classification
Malaria - transmission
Russia
Species Specificity
Abstract
The lists of malaria mosquitoes in Russia includes 12 species, rather than 13, as it was formerly considered (Gornostaeva, 2000; Gornostaeva, Danilov, 2002), because Anopheles subalpinus is a junior synonym of An. melanoon. Data accumulated up to present are still not sufficient to characterize ranges of many species in Russia, specifically An. beklemishevi, An. maculipennis, and An. messea. Careful investigations of biodiversity and ranges of the malaria mosquitoes in different territories of Russia have not been carried out since 40-60th. In the last 50 years, a cytodiagnostic method appeared to be the most perspective method for the study of biodiversity and ranges of the malaria mosquitoes in Russia. Critical analysis of data obtained by this methods shows that the studies of biodiversity and ranges of the malaria mosquitoes should be performed in a contact of entomologist and genetic experts to avoid errors in a collection of field data and laboratory tests. The study of biodiversity and ranges of the malaria mosquitoes is a quite important field of investigations, because of increase of local cases of the malaria disease and unfavorable prognosis for nearest years in relation to the malaria.
PubMed ID
14515507 View in PubMed
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Analysis of western encephalomyelitis surveillance and control programs in Manitoba, 1975.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251088
Source
Can J Public Health. 1976 May-Jun;67 Suppl 1:72-3
Publication Type
Article

[An analysis of the dysentery epidemic process in Blagoveshchensk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228971
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1990 Jun;(6):34-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
V K Kurganov
V V Krasnikov
O P Pischikova
E I Shmelev
V V Stepanenko
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1990 Jun;(6):34-6
Date
Jun-1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Dairy Products - adverse effects
Diptera
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Dysentery, Bacillary - epidemiology - transmission
Food Microbiology
Humans
Insect Vectors
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Siberia - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Water Supply - standards
Abstract
The retrospective analysis of dysentery morbidity in Blagoveshchensk for the period of 1960-1987 was made. The regularities linking general natural and biological factors triggering the epidemic process with dysentery morbidity among the population are emphasized. The study revealed that under the conditions of Blagoveshchensk dairy products were of major epidemic importance among factors contributing to the transmission of dysentery. Such a factor as flies also had a definite influence on the epidemic process of dysentery. Another risk factor was drinking water which influenced the epidemic process both directly and indirectly through dairy products and, probably, other foodstuffs. Reliable correlation between dysentery morbidity among the population and the quality of dairy products, tap water and the number of flies was established.
PubMed ID
2220218 View in PubMed
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An attempt to evaluate the spreading of Taenia saginata eggs in the environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233899
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 1988;29(3-4):511-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988

[A NATURAL PLAGUE FOCUS. IN GORNYI ALTAI: FORMATION, DEVELOPMENT, AND FUNCTIONING].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271669
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2016 Jan-Mar;(1):17-25
Publication Type
Article
Author
V M Korzun
S V Balakhoiov
E V Chpanin
A V Denisov
E P Mikhailov
A J Mischenko
M B Yarygina
E N Rozhdestvensky
L A Fomina
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2016 Jan-Mar;(1):17-25
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Outbreaks
Ecosystem
Flea Infestations - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission - veterinary
Humans
Insect Vectors - microbiology
Lagomorpha - microbiology
Plague - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission - veterinary
Siberia - epidemiology
Siphonaptera - microbiology
Yersinia pestis - pathogenicity - physiology
Zoonoses - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
The paper gives the results of analyzing the data of long-term studies of the natural focal pattern of plague in the Gornyi Altai natural focus. It describes a wide range of biological processes occurring in the focus and shows the most important patterns of its functioning as a complex multilevel ecological system. The key features of the formation of the focus have been revealed. The plague focus in South-Western Altai has formed relatively, recently, about half a century ago, then it has intensively developed and its enzootic area and the activity of epizootic manifestations have considerably increased. This process is due to the space-time transformations of the basic ecological and population characteristics of Pallas' pika (Ochotoma pallasi), the principal vector of the pathogen of plague and fleas parasitizing the mammal, which is in turn related to the aridization of mountain steppes in South-Western Altai.
PubMed ID
27029141 View in PubMed
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An epidemic of tularemia in Sweden during the summer of 1967.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110927
Source
Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand. 1968;72(3):463-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968

203 records – page 1 of 21.