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eLearning course may shorten the duration of mechanical restraint among psychiatric inpatients: a cluster-randomized trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259110
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Oct;68(7):443-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Raija Kontio
Anneli Pitkänen
Grigori Joffe
Jouko Katajisto
Maritta Välimäki
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Oct;68(7):443-9
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aggression - psychology
Coercion
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods
Education, Nursing, Continuing - methods
Female
Finland
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology
Psychiatric Nursing - education
Restraint, Physical - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Time Factors
Abstract
The management of psychiatric inpatients exhibiting severely disturbed and aggressive behaviour is an important educational topic. Well structured, IT-based educational programmes (eLearning) often ensure quality and may make training more affordable and accessible.
The aim of this study was to explore the impact of an eLearning course for personnel on the rates and duration of seclusion and mechanical restraint among psychiatric inpatients.
In a cluster-randomized intervention trial, the nursing personnel on 10 wards were randomly assigned to eLearning (intervention) or training-as-usual (control) groups. The eLearning course comprised six modules with specific topics (legal and ethical issues, behaviour-related factors, therapeutic relationship and self-awareness, teamwork and integrating knowledge with practice) and specific learning methods. The rates (incidents per 1000 occupied bed days) and durations of the coercion incidents were examined before and after the course.
A total of 1283 coercion incidents (1143 seclusions [89%] and 140 incidents involving the use of mechanical restraints [11%]) were recorded on the study wards during the data collection period. On the intervention wards, there were no statistically significant changes in the rates of seclusion and mechanical restraint. However, the duration of incidents involving mechanical restraints shortened from 36.0 to 4.0 h (median) (P
PubMed ID
24274836 View in PubMed
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Hospitals' organizational variables and patients' perceptions of individualized nursing care in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164720
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2007 Mar;15(2):197-206
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Riitta Suhonen
Maritta Välimäki
Jouko Katajisto
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Author Affiliation
Health Care District of Forssa, Forssa, Finland. suhonen.riitta@kolumbus.fi
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2007 Mar;15(2):197-206
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Clinical Competence - standards
Cross-Sectional Studies
Finland
Hospital Bed Capacity - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Models, Nursing
Nurse Administrators - organization & administration - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Care - organization & administration - psychology
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration
Nursing, Team - organization & administration
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Care Planning - organization & administration
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Primary Nursing - organization & administration
Quality of Health Care - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Abstract
To examine the association between hospitals' organizational variables and patients' perceptions of individualized care.
There is lack of evidence related to the effects that the hospital environment has on patient perceptions of the individuality of care they receive.
A cross-sectional design was used. The questionnaire survey data were obtained from 861 (response rate 82%) hospital patients and 35 (100%) nurse managers in Finland. Results An inverse relationship between the size of the hospital and ward and patients' perceptions of individualized care was found. Increased staffing or skill mix failed to predict a higher patient perception of individualized care, but primary nursing care delivery did.
Instead of increasing the amount of nursing staff, there is a need to improve the quality of the nurse-patient interactions to facilitate individualized care. The generalizability of the study is limited by the regional nature of the setting.
PubMed ID
17352703 View in PubMed
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Patient characteristics in relation to perceptions of how individualized care is delivered--research into the sensitivity of the Individualized Care Scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168145
Source
J Prof Nurs. 2006 Jul-Aug;22(4):253-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
Riitta Suhonen
Maritta Välimäki
Jouko Katajisto
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Author Affiliation
University of Turku, Turku, Finland. suhonen.ritta@kolumbus.fi
Source
J Prof Nurs. 2006 Jul-Aug;22(4):253-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient Care Planning - standards
Psychometrics
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires - standards
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Factors
Abstract
The purposes of this study were to examine how hospital patients' backgrounds and clinical illness are related to their perceptions of the individualized care they receive and to test the sensitivity of the Individualized Care Scale (ICS). Cross-sectional explorative survey data were obtained using questionnaires completed by 861 (response rate = 88%) predischarge hospital patients from six hospitals in Southern Finland in 2004. Self-administered questionnaires included the ICS as well as the 15D, a measure of health-related quality of life, and gathered information about the patients' backgrounds. Based on association tests, younger age, poorer state of health, and higher level of education were associated with more critical perceptions of individualized care. Using simultaneous regression analysis and presenting the results from stronger to weaker, we found age to be the strongest predictor of patients' positive perceptions of the individualized care they received. This was followed by health-related quality of life (HRQoL) as measured by the 15D, vocational education, and type of admission. The ICS was found to be a valid tool for the measurement of individualized care in hospitals. The self-reported patient data from this survey suggest that some patient characteristics are associated with the patients' perceptions about the individualized care they receive. There is now a need to consider how these characteristics can be taken into account in nursing care delivery to increase individualized care for hospital patients. The results also support use of the ICS in the measurement of individualized care in hospitals.
PubMed ID
16873049 View in PubMed
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