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Acceptability and compliance with wearing energy-shunting hip protectors: a 6-month prospective follow-up in a Finnish nursing home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171901
Source
Age Ageing. 1998 Mar;27(2):225-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
J. Parkkari
J. Heikkilä
I P Kannus
Author Affiliation
Accident and Trauma Research Centre, UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Kaupinpuistonkatu I, FIN-33500 Tampere, Finland.
Source
Age Ageing. 1998 Mar;27(2):225-9
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Fractures - prevention & control
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Nursing Homes
Patient compliance
Patient satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Protective Clothing
Abstract
To assess the acceptability and compliance with use of an energy-shunting hip protector in institutionalized elderly people.
A 6 month prospective follow-up in a Finnish nursing home.
19 ambulatory nursing home residents with a high risk of hip fracture.
The proportion of the residents who were willing to use the device, the number of hours of wearing the protector and the attitudes of the study subjects and the caregivers towards the appearance, comfort, fit, efficacy and laundering of the protector.
12 of the 19 ambulatory residents (63%) agreed to use the protector. During the study period, these subjects wore the protector on average for more than 90% of their active days, i.e. the days they were mobile. Two subjects wore the protectors at night time; the rest only during waking hours. Mean wearing time during waking hours exceeded 90%.
External hip joint protectors are a feasible strategy to prevent hip fractures in institutionalized elderly people. The attitude, education and motivation of the staff may be a factor in achieving good user compliance. Further community-based studies on acceptability and compliance in wearing external hip joint protectors are needed for verification of benefits to the general population of older people.
Notes
Comment In: Age Ageing. 1998 Mar;27(2):89-9016296665
PubMed ID
16296684 View in PubMed
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Adverse childhood experiences and suicidal behavior of adolescent psychiatric inpatients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122157
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2013 Jan;22(1):13-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Reetta Isohookana
Kaisa Riala
Helinä Hakko
Pirkko Räsänen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, 90014, Oulu, Finland. reettais@paju.oulu.fi
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2013 Jan;22(1):13-22
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Child
Cohort Studies
Domestic Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Inpatients - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Odds Ratio
Parents - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The present study examines the association of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) to suicidal behavior and mortality in 508 Finnish adolescents (aged 12-17 years) who required acute psychiatric hospitalization between April 2001 and March 2006. The Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children Present and Lifetime (K-SADS-PL) and the European Addiction Severity Index (EuropASI) were used to obtain information about ACEs, adolescents' suicidal behavior and psychiatric diagnoses. The cases of death were obtained from Statistics Finland. The results of our study indicated that, among girls, exposure to sexual abuse statistically significantly increased the risk of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) (OR, 1.8; 95 % CI, 1.0-3.2) and suicide attempts (OR, 2.3; 95 % CI, 1.0-4.5). The cumulative number of ACEs was also associated with an increased risk of NSSI (OR, 1.2; 95 % CI, 1.0- 1.4) and suicide attempts (OR, 1.2; 95 % CI, 1.0-1.4) in girls. Among all deceased adolescents, ACEs were most notable among those who had died due to accidents and injuries. Gender differences in the types of ACEs were noted and discussed.
PubMed ID
22842795 View in PubMed
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[AIDS. Hospital department's responsibility to prevent patients from infecting each other]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8507
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1989 Feb 22;89(8):11-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-1989

Alcohol-related deaths and social factors in depression mortality: a register-based follow-up of depressed in-patients and antidepressant users in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116810
Source
J Affect Disord. 2013 Jun;148(2-3):278-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Heta Moustgaard
Kaisla Joutsenniemi
Sinikka Sihvo
Pekka Martikainen
Author Affiliation
Population Research Unit, Department of Social Research, PO Box 18, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland. heta.moustgaard@helsinki.fi
Source
J Affect Disord. 2013 Jun;148(2-3):278-85
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol-Related Disorders - mortality
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Cause of Death - trends
Depression - drug therapy - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Inpatients - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Excess mortality of depression is established for various causes of death, but evidence is scarce on alcohol-related causes. It also remains unclear whether the magnitude of the excess varies by social factors. This study aimed to quantify the contribution of alcohol-related causes of death and to assess modifying effects of socioeconomic position, employment status, and living arrangements in the excess mortality of depression.
A 14% sample of community-dwelling Finns aged 40-64 at the end of 1997 was assessed for depression, using register data on psychiatric hospital care and antidepressant use in 1996-1997. Depressed in-patients (n=897), out-patients using antidepressants (n=13,658), and non-depressed individuals (n=217,140) were followed up for cause-specific mortality in 1998-2007, distinguishing between alcohol- and non-alcohol-related deaths, and testing for variation in the excess mortality according to baseline social factors.
Depressed in- and out-patients had significant excess mortality for suicide (age-adjusted rate ratios RR=3.77 for men and RR=6.35 for women), all accidental and violent causes (RR=3.47 and RR=4.43), and diseases (RR=1.67 and RR=1.41). Of the excess, alcohol-related causes accounted for 50% among depressed men and 30% among women. Excess mortality varied little by social factors, particularly in non-alcohol-related causes. Where variation was significant, the relative excess was larger among those with higher socioeconomic position and the employed. Absolute excess was, however, larger among those with lower socioeconomic position, the unemployed, and the unpartnered.
Depression was measured indirectly by hospital and antidepressant use.
The results highlight the major role of alcohol in depression mortality.
PubMed ID
23357655 View in PubMed
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Analysis of patient diaries in Danish ICUs: a narrative approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149487
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2009 Oct;25(5):268-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Ingrid Egerod
Doris Christensen
Author Affiliation
The University Hospitals Centre for Nursing and Care Research (UCSF), Rigshospitalet Department 7331, University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health Sciences, Denmark. ie@ucsf.dk
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2009 Oct;25(5):268-77
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Critical Care - organization & administration - psychology
Critical Illness - psychology
Denmark
Female
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Life Change Events
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Narration
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Abstract
The objective was to describe the structure and content of patient diaries written for critically ill patients in Danish intensive care units (ICUs).
Critical illness is associated with physical and psychological aftermath including cognitive impairment and post-traumatic stress. Patient diaries written in the intensive care unit are used to help ICU-survivors come to terms with their illness.
The study had a qualitative, descriptive and explorative design, using a narrative approach of analysis. Data were analysed on several levels: extra-case level, case level, diary-entry level, and sub-entry level. The sample consisted of 25 patient diaries written by critical care nurses in 2007 for patients at a general ICU in Denmark.
The base narrative describes three stages: crisis, turning point, and normalisation. Each case includes parallel plots of nurse, patient and family, which converge during normalisation. Each diary is structured by: summary, daily entries and end note. Each diary entry is structured by: greeting, narrator status, patient status, family status/contextual cues and sign-off note.
Patient diaries acknowledge the patient experience and provide new insights into nursing performance. This study offers a framework for understanding ICU patient diaries, which may facilitate cross-unit comparisons and support future guideline development. The dual perspectives of patient diaries and the ambiguous ownership of the narratives may pave the way for insights to improve critical care nursing and ICU rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
19632844 View in PubMed
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An assessment of quality of sleep and the use of drugs with sedating properties in hospitalized adult patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180959
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2004 Mar 24;2:17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-24-2004
Author
Luciana Frighetto
Carlo Marra
Shakeel Bandali
Kerry Wilbur
Terryn Naumann
Peter Jewesson
Author Affiliation
Pharmaceutical Sciences Clinical Service Unit, Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Center, 855 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada. frighett@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2004 Mar 24;2:17
Date
Mar-24-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Chronic Disease
Drug Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over
Hospitalization
Hospitals, Teaching - utilization
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sickness Impact Profile
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - drug therapy - etiology
Abstract
Hospitalization can significantly disrupt sleeping patterns. In consideration of the previous reports of insomnia and apparent widespread use of benzodiazepines and other hypnotics in hospitalized patients, we conducted a study to assess quality of sleep and hypnotic drug use in our acute care adult patient population. The primary objectives of this study were to assess sleep disturbance and its determinants including the use of drugs with sedating properties.
This single-centre prospective study involved an assessment of sleep quality for consenting patients admitted to the general medicine and family practice units of an acute care Canadian hospital. A validated Verran and Snyder-Halpern (VSH) Sleep Scale measuring sleep disturbance, sleep effectiveness, and sleep supplementation was completed daily by patients and scores were compared to population statistics. Patients were also asked to identify factors influencing sleep while in hospital, and sedating drug use prior to and during hospitalization was also assessed.
During the 70-day study period, 100 patients completed at least one sleep questionnaire. There was a relatively even distribution of males versus females, most patients were in their 8th decade of life, retired, and suffered from multiple chronic diseases. The median self-reported pre-admission sleep duration for participants was 8 hours and our review of PharmaNet profiles revealed that 35 (35%) patients had received a dispensed prescription for a hypnotic or antidepressant drug in the 3-month period prior to admission. Benzodiazepines were the most common sedating drugs prescribed. Over 300 sleep disturbance, effective and supplementation scores were completed. Sleep disturbance scores across all study days ranged 16-681, sleep effectiveness scores ranged 54-402, while sleep supplementation scores ranged between 0-358. Patients tended to have worse sleep scores as compared to healthy non-hospitalized US adults in all three scales. When compared to US non-hospitalized adults with insomnia, our patients demonstrated sleep disturbance and supplementation scores that were similar on Day 1, but lower (i.e. improved) on Day 3, while sleep effectiveness were higher (i.e. better) on both days. There was an association between sleep disturbance scores and the number of chronic diseases, the presence of pain, the use of bedtime tricyclic antidepressants, and the number of chronic diseases without pain. There was also an association between sleep effectiveness scores and the length of hospitalization, the in hospital use of bedtime sedatives and the presence of pain. Finally, an association was identified between sleep supplementation scores and the in hospital use of bedtime sedatives (tricyclic antidepressants and loxapine), and age. Twenty-nine (29%) patients received a prescription for a hypnotic drug while in hospital, with no evidence of pre-admission hypnotic use. The majority of these patients were prescribed zopiclone, lorazepam or another benzodiazepine.
The results of this study reveal that quality of sleep is a problem that affects hospitalized adult medical service patients and a relatively high percentage of these patients are being prescribed a hypnotic prior to and during hospitalization.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15040803 View in PubMed
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Apathy: prevalence, associated factors, and prognostic value among frail, older inpatients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124530
Source
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2012 Jul;13(6):541-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Eeva H Hölttä
Marja-Liisa Laakkonen
Jouko V Laurila
Timo E Strandberg
Reijo S Tilvis
Kaisu H Pitkälä
Author Affiliation
Helsinki University Central Hospital, Unit of General Practice and City of Helsinki, Health Center, Helsinki, Finland. eeva.holtta@hel.fi
Source
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2012 Jul;13(6):541-5
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Apathy
Delirium - mortality - psychology
Dementia - mortality - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Frail Elderly - psychology
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Prevalence
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The association of apathy with Alzheimer disease and other dementias and caregiver burden has been examined in a number of studies; however, less is known about its relationship with delirium and mortality. We aimed to investigate the prevalence, relationship with delirium and dementia, and prognostic value of apathy in an elderly and frail inpatient population.
The cohort included 425 patients in acute geriatric wards and in 7 nursing homes in Helsinki (1999-2000). Demographic factors, physical functioning, diagnoses, and drugs were assessed with special reference for dementia, delirium, and apathy. Mortality was registered from central registers.
Of the patients, 98 (23.1%) suffered from apathy, and it was more frequent among men (32% versus 21% women, P = .037 ). There was no difference in mean age, number of comorbidities, or in the mean number of medications between those with and without apathy; however, those with apathy had lower mean MMSE points (9.2 versus 14.0 without apathy, P
PubMed ID
22572553 View in PubMed
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Assaultive behaviour in psychiatrically hospitalized elderly: a response to psychosocial stimulation and changes in pharmacotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197706
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2000 Jul;15(7):582-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
M. Wystanski
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2000 Jul;15(7):582-5
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aggression - drug effects - psychology
Delirium, Dementia, Amnestic, Cognitive Disorders - drug therapy - psychology
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Inpatients - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Ontario
Psychotropic Drugs - adverse effects
Violence - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The objective of this naturalistic, non-experimental study was to observe and evaluate the relationship between psychosocial stimulation and changes in medications, and the emergence of the assaultive behaviour, as well as its 24-h course, in a psychogeriatric ward. The assaultive behaviour in 29 patients (mean age 73.9 years) was rated daily for three consecutive months. Major psychosocial stimuli and the number of medication changes were also recorded. More patients with organic brain syndromes than with non-organic conditions were aggressive. Those with organic syndromes were more likely to become aggressive within any 24 h period and their aggression was less likely to disappear. The rate with which aggression emerged changed following changes in psychotropic medications. The presence of psychosocial stimulation and changes in non-psychotropic medications modified the rate of disappearance of the aggression. In a psychogeriatric inpatient population, both prevalence and incidence of aggression, as well as its response to modifying factors, depends critically on pathogenesis. The emergence and disappearance of aggression are modified by different factors.
PubMed ID
10918337 View in PubMed
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Assessing quality of life in a clinical study on heart rehabilitation patients: how well do value sets based on given or experienced health states reflect patients' valuations?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276518
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2016;14:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Reiner Leidl
Bernd Schweikert
Harry Hahmann
Juergen M Steinacker
Peter Reitmeir
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2016;14:48
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - psychology - rehabilitation
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients - psychology
Patient satisfaction
Quality of Life - psychology
Regression Analysis
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Quality of life as an endpoint in a clinical study may be sensitive to the value set used to derive a single score. Focusing on patients' actual valuations in a clinical study, we compare different value sets for the EQ-5D-3L and assess how well they reproduce patients' reported results.
A clinical study comparing inpatient (n = 98) and outpatient (n = 47) rehabilitation of patients after an acute coronary event is re-analyzed. Value sets include: 1. Given health states and time-trade-off valuation (GHS-TTO) rendering economic utilities; 2. Experienced health states and valuation by visual analog scale (EHS-VAS). Valuations are compared with patient-reported VAS rating. Accuracy is assessed by mean absolute error (MAE) and by Pearson's correlation ?. External validity is tested by correlation with established MacNew global scores. Drivers of differences between value sets and VAS are analyzed using repeated measures regression.
EHS-VAS had smaller MAEs and higher ? in all patients and in the inpatient group, and correlated best with MacNew global score. Quality-adjusted survival was more accurately reflected by EHS-VAS. Younger, better educated patients reported lower VAS at admission than the EHS-based value set. EHS-based estimates were mostly able to reproduce patient-reported valuation. Economic utility measurement is conceptually different, produced results less strongly related to patients' reports, and resulted in about 20 % longer quality-adjusted survival.
Decision makers should take into account the impact of choosing value sets on effectiveness results. For transferring the results of heart rehabilitation patients from another country or from another valuation method, the EHS-based value set offers a promising estimation option for those decision makers who prioritize patient-reported valuation. Yet, EHS-based estimates may not fully reflect patient-reported VAS in all situations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27005466 View in PubMed
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230 records – page 1 of 23.