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Acceptability and compliance with wearing energy-shunting hip protectors: a 6-month prospective follow-up in a Finnish nursing home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171901
Source
Age Ageing. 1998 Mar;27(2):225-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
J. Parkkari
J. Heikkilä
I P Kannus
Author Affiliation
Accident and Trauma Research Centre, UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Kaupinpuistonkatu I, FIN-33500 Tampere, Finland.
Source
Age Ageing. 1998 Mar;27(2):225-9
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Fractures - prevention & control
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Nursing Homes
Patient compliance
Patient satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Protective Clothing
Abstract
To assess the acceptability and compliance with use of an energy-shunting hip protector in institutionalized elderly people.
A 6 month prospective follow-up in a Finnish nursing home.
19 ambulatory nursing home residents with a high risk of hip fracture.
The proportion of the residents who were willing to use the device, the number of hours of wearing the protector and the attitudes of the study subjects and the caregivers towards the appearance, comfort, fit, efficacy and laundering of the protector.
12 of the 19 ambulatory residents (63%) agreed to use the protector. During the study period, these subjects wore the protector on average for more than 90% of their active days, i.e. the days they were mobile. Two subjects wore the protectors at night time; the rest only during waking hours. Mean wearing time during waking hours exceeded 90%.
External hip joint protectors are a feasible strategy to prevent hip fractures in institutionalized elderly people. The attitude, education and motivation of the staff may be a factor in achieving good user compliance. Further community-based studies on acceptability and compliance in wearing external hip joint protectors are needed for verification of benefits to the general population of older people.
Notes
Comment In: Age Ageing. 1998 Mar;27(2):89-9016296665
PubMed ID
16296684 View in PubMed
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Acceptability and impact of pet visitation on a pediatric cardiology inpatient unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188040
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2002 Oct;17(5):354-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
Adam S Wu
Ruta Niedra
Lisa Pendergast
Brian W McCrindle
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Department of Paediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children and the University of Toronto, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 1X8.
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2002 Oct;17(5):354-62
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Animals
Bonding, Human-Pet
Cardiology
Child
Child, Hospitalized
Child, Preschool
Heart Diseases - psychology - therapy
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Infant
Inpatients
Ontario
Patient satisfaction
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
Visitors to Patients
Abstract
We evaluated the effectiveness of a pet visitation program in helping children and their families adjust to hospitalization on a pediatric cardiology ward. Thirty-one pet visits were observed and followed by interviews with patients and parents. Analysis of data suggested that pet visits relieved stress, normalized the hospital milieu, and improved patient and parent morale. The benefit received by the subjects correlated with the amount of physical contact and rapport developed with the visiting animal.
PubMed ID
12395303 View in PubMed
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[Accidents among hospitalized patients in Sweden].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236693
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1986 Aug 6;86(32):31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-6-1986
Author
I. Rosenkvist
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1986 Aug 6;86(32):31
Date
Aug-6-1986
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Humans
Inpatients
Patients
Risk
Sweden
PubMed ID
3638850 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of healthcare worker recall and medical record review for identifying infectious exposures to hospitalized patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168575
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2006 Jul;27(7):722-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
M. Aquino
J M Raboud
A. McGeer
K. Green
R. Chow
P. Dimoulas
M. Loeb
D. Scales
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2006 Jul;27(7):722-8
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disease Transmission, Infectious
Environmental Exposure
Hospitalization
Humans
Inpatients
Medical Audit
Mental Recall
Ontario
Personnel, Hospital
Abstract
To determine the validity of using healthcare worker (HCW) recall of patient interactions and medical record review for contact tracing in a critical care setting.
Trained observers recorded the interactions of nurses, respiratory therapists, and service assistants with study patients in a medical-surgical intensive care unit. These observers' records were used as the reference standard to test the criterion validity of using HCW recall data or medical record review data to identify exposure characteristics. We assessed the effects of previous quarantine of the HCW (because of possible exposure) and the availability of patients' medical records for use as memory aids on the accuracy of HCW recall.
A 10-bed medical-surgical intensive care unit at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Ontario.
Thirty-six HCWs observed caring for 16 patients, for a total of 55 healthcare worker shifts.
Recall accuracy was better among HCWs who were provided with patient medical records as memory aids (P
PubMed ID
16807848 View in PubMed
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[Actual problems of inpatient psychiatric care in Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105844
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2013;113(10):4-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
V S Iastrebov
V G Mitikhin
T A Solokhina
L S Shevchenko
N A Tvorogova
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2013;113(10):4-10
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Inpatients
Mental Disorders - therapy
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Psychiatry - organization & administration
Russia
Abstract
A comparative evaluation of inpatient psychiatric care in Russia and some other countries is presented. A systematic analysis of the performance of psychiatric hospitals is conducted. The process of the deinstitutionalization in Russian psychiatry is highlighted. A range of problems hindering a reform of inpatient psychiatric service of the country is singled out.
PubMed ID
24300798 View in PubMed
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Acute care inpatients with long-term delayed-discharge: evidence from a Canadian health region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123167
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:172
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Andrew P Costa
Jeffrey W Poss
Thomas Peirce
John P Hirdes
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1, Canada. acosta@uwaterloo.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:172
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Acute Disease - epidemiology - therapy
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bed Occupancy - statistics & numerical data
Catchment Area (Health) - statistics & numerical data
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Home Care Services - standards
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data - trends
Long-Term Care - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes - standards
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Discharge - standards - statistics & numerical data - trends
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Acute hospital discharge delays are a pressing concern for many health care administrators. In Canada, a delayed discharge is defined by the alternate level of care (ALC) construct and has been the target of many provincial health care strategies. Little is known on the patient characteristics that influence acute ALC length of stay. This study examines which characteristics drive acute ALC length of stay for those awaiting nursing home admission.
Population-level administrative and assessment data were used to examine 17,111 acute hospital admissions designated as alternate level of care (ALC) from a large Canadian health region. Case level hospital records were linked to home care administrative and assessment records to identify and characterize those ALC patients that account for the greatest proportion of acute hospital ALC days.
ALC patients waiting for nursing home admission accounted for 41.5% of acute hospital ALC bed days while only accounting for 8.8% of acute hospital ALC patients. Characteristics that were significantly associated with greater ALC lengths of stay were morbid obesity (27?day mean deviation, 99% CI?=?±14.6), psychiatric diagnosis (13?day mean deviation, 99% CI?=?±6.2), abusive behaviours (12?day mean deviation, 99% CI?=?±10.7), and stroke (7?day mean deviation, 99% CI?=?±5.0). Overall, persons with morbid obesity, a psychiatric diagnosis, abusive behaviours, or stroke accounted for 4.3% of all ALC patients and 23% of all acute hospital ALC days between April 1st 2009 and April 1st, 2011. ALC patients with the identified characteristics had unique clinical profiles.
A small number of patients with non-medical days waiting for nursing home admission contribute to a substantial proportion of total non-medical days in acute hospitals. Increases in nursing home capacity or changes to existing funding arrangements should target the sub-populations identified in this investigation to maximize effectiveness. Specifically, incentives should be introduced to encourage nursing homes to accept acute patients with the least prospect for community-based living, while acute patients with the greatest prospect for community-based living are discharged to transitional care or directly to community-based care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22726609 View in PubMed
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Acute infections and venous thromboembolism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130192
Source
J Intern Med. 2012 Jun;271(6):608-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
M. Schmidt
E. Horvath-Puho
R W Thomsen
L. Smeeth
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. morten.schmidt@dce.au.dk
Source
J Intern Med. 2012 Jun;271(6):608-18
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Algorithms
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteremia - complications
Bacterial Infections - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Community-Acquired Infections - complications
Cross Infection - complications - drug therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Intraabdominal Infections - complications
Logistic Models
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Outpatients - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Pulmonary Embolism - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - complications
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Skin Diseases, Bacterial - complications
Urinary Tract Infections - complications
Venous Thromboembolism - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Data on the association between acute infections and venous thromboembolism (VTE) are sparse. We examined whether various hospital-diagnosed infections or infections treated in the community increase the risk of VTE.
We conducted this population-based case-control study in Northern Denmark (population 1.8 million) using medical databases. We identified all patients with a first hospital-diagnosed VTE during the period 1999-2009 (n = 15 009). For each case, we selected 10 controls from the general population matched for age, gender and county of residence (n = 150 074). We identified all hospital-diagnosed infections and community prescriptions for antibiotics 1 year predating VTE. We used odds ratios from a conditional logistic regression model to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of VTE within different time intervals of the first year after infection, controlling for confounding.
Respiratory tract, urinary tract, skin, intra-abdominal and bacteraemic infections diagnosed in hospital or treated in the community were associated with a greater than equal to twofold increased VTE risk. The association was strongest within the first 2 weeks after infection onset, gradually declining thereafter. Compared with individuals without infection during the year before VTE, the IRR for VTE within the first 3 months after infection was 12.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): 11.3-13.9) for patients with hospital-diagnosed infection and 4.0 (95% CI: 3.8-4.1) for patients treated with antibiotics in the community. Adjustment for VTE risk factors reduced these IRRs to 3.3 (95% CI: 2.9-3.8) and 2.6 (95% CI: 2.5-2.8), respectively. Similar associations were found for unprovoked VTE and for deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism individually.
Infections are a risk factor for VTE.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22026462 View in PubMed
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Acute mastoiditis in Greenland between 1994-2007

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96607
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1335
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Author
Homøe, P
Jensen, RG
Brofeldt, S
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark. phom@rh.regionh.dk
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1335
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute mastoiditis
Acute otitis media (AOM)
Antibiotics
Arctic
Auricle
Bacteriological examination
Childhood
Chronic otitis media
Facial nerve paralysis
Indigenous populations
National Greenland Inpatient Register
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The indigenous populations of the Arctic are prone to middle ear infections starting with an early age first episode, followed by frequent episodes of acute otitis media (AOM) during childhood. A high proportion develop chronic otitis media. Acute mastoiditis is a serious complication of AOM in childhood with postauricular swelling, erythema, and tenderness, protrusion of the auricle, high fever and general malaise. The disease may protrude intracranially. The incidence rates for acute mastoiditis in the Western world range from 1.2 to 4.2 cases/100 000 per year. There exists no epidemiological data on acute mastoiditis in the Arctic region. METHODS: A retrospective search was made for the WHO ICD-10 code DH70.0 (denoting acute mastoiditis) using the National Greenland Inpatient Register for the period 1994-2007, inclusive. Fifteen patients were registered and their medical records were retrieved. Four patients were obviously misclassified, leaving 11 patients for evaluation. The medical records were available for 10 patients. The diagnostic inclusion criterion was written clinical signs of acute mastoiditis. RESULTS: Based on the case series the incidence rate was calculated to be 1.4 for the total Greenlandic population and 7.4 for children 0 and 10 years of age. Median age was 14 months (5-105 months) and eight were female (72%). Seven of the 10 were exclusively treated with antibiotics and three underwent additional ear surgery. Bacteriological examination was performed in five of 10. One 8 month-old girl presented with a contemporary facial nerve paralysis and was treated with intravenous antibiotics; one 8 year-old girl was evacuated to Copenhagen for urgent surgery due to signs of meningitis. Acute CT scan showed a cerebellar abscess and a thrombosis in the lateral sigmoid sinus vein. An extensive cholesteatoma was found and eradicated during surgery. Six weeks later the patient returned home with a maximal conductive hearing loss as the only complication. All patients recovered from the disease. CONCLUSION: The incidence of acute mastoiditis in Greenland is comparable to the incidence elsewhere, although AOM occurs more frequently among small children in the Greenlandic population. The disease is serious and must be treated immediately with intravenous antibiotics, followed by urgent surgery if there is no improvement.
PubMed ID
20568909 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction: quality of care in rural Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167771
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 Jan;52:68-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Trustin Domes
Olga Szafran
Cheryl Bilous
Odell Olson
G Richard Spooner
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 Jan;52:68-9
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Emergency Service, Hospital - standards
Exercise Test - utilization
Female
Hospitals, Rural - standards
Humans
Inpatients
Male
Medical Audit
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - therapy
Quality of Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Rural Health Services - standards
Abstract
To assess the quality of care of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a rural health region.
Clinical audit employing multiple explicit criteria of care elements for emergency department and in-hospital AMI management. The audit was conducted using retrospective chart review.
Twelve acute care health centres and hospitals in the East Central Health Region, a rural health region in Alberta, where medical and surgical services are provided almost entirely by family physicians.
Hospital inpatients with a confirmed discharge diagnosis of AMI (ICD-9-CM codes 410.xx) during the period April 1, 2001, to March 31, 2002, were included (177 confirmed cases).
Quality of AMI care was assessed using guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association and the Canadian Cardiovascular Outcomes Research Team and Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Quality of care indicators at three stages of patient care were assessed: at initial recognition and AMI management in the emergency department, during in-hospital AMI management, and at preparation for discharge from hospital.
In the emergency department, the quality of care was high for most procedural and therapeutic audit elements, with the exception of rapid electrocardiography, urinalysis, and provision of nitroglycerin and morphine. Average door-to-needle time for thrombolysis was 102.5 minutes. The quality of in-hospital care was high for most elements, but low for nitroglycerin and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, daily electrocardiography, and counseling regarding smoking cessation and diet. Few patients received counseling for lifestyle changes at hospital discharge. Male and younger patients were treated more aggressively than female and older patients. Sites that used care protocols achieved better results in initial AMI management than sites that did not. Stress testing was not readily available in the rural region studied.
Quality of care for patients with AMI in this rural health region was high for most guideline elements. Standing orders, protocols, and checklists could improve care. Training and resource issues will need to be addressed to improve access to stress testing for rural patients. Clinical audit should be at the core of a system for local monitoring of quality of care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16926968 View in PubMed
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Adolescent psychiatric in-patients. A high-risk group for premature death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196074
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2000 Feb;176:121-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
E. Kjelsberg
Author Affiliation
Centre for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2000 Feb;176:121-5
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Diagnosis-Related Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
Research has demonstrated increased mortality rates in adolescent psychiatric in-patients.
To investigate this excess mortality by calculating standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) relative to cause of death, diagnosis, cohort and age.
A nationwide Norwegian sample of 1095 former adolescent psychiatric in-patients were followed up 15-33 years after first hospitalisation by record linkage to the National Death Cause Registry.
The SMR was significantly increased for almost all causes of death investigated. In males, all psychiatric diagnoses had significantly increased SMRs, whereas in females, organic mental disorder, anxiety disorder and affective disorder had non-significantly increased SMRs. The SMR was significantly elevated for all age-spans and cohorts investigated.
A broad prevention strategy is needed to combat the increased mortality rates found in adolescent psychiatric in-patients.
PubMed ID
10755047 View in PubMed
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741 records – page 1 of 75.