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[58 people with bullet wounds in Gothenburg during 18 months. This demonstrates the need for preparedness and competence within trauma care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273221
Source
Lakartidningen. 2015;112
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Björn Holmström
Sven Alhbin
David Pazooki
Hans Granhed
Source
Lakartidningen. 2015;112
Date
2015
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
After-Hours Care
Aged
Blood pressure
Clinical Competence
Emergency Medical Services - standards
Health Care Costs
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds, Gunshot - economics - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
From 1 January 2013 to 30 June 2014, 58 patients sustained gunshot wounds in the city of Gothenburg. 57 were males and the median age was 26 years. The majority of injuries were musculoskeletal. Ten patients died, of these 4 patients suffered single gunshot wounds to the head, while 6 patients had wounds to mediastinal structures and large abdominal vessels. 90 % of patients presented out-of-hours. The total length of stay for the 47 patients admitted was 316 days. Direct health care costs were calculated to 6.2 MSEK.
PubMed ID
26173141 View in PubMed
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The 1990 Fraser Gurd Lecture: a Canadian trauma registry system--nine years experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226225
Source
J Trauma. 1991 Jun;31(6):856-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
C M Burns
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Manitoba Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
J Trauma. 1991 Jun;31(6):856-66
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Manitoba - epidemiology
Registries
Wounds and injuries - classification - epidemiology
PubMed ID
2056552 View in PubMed
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The 1993 Fraser N. Gurd Lecture: The view from the edge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217361
Source
J Trauma. 1994 Sep;37(3):379-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
G W Fitzgerald
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Charles S. Curtis Memorial Hospital, St. Anthony, Newfoundland, Canada.
Source
J Trauma. 1994 Sep;37(3):379-86
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Delivery of Health Care
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Off-Road Motor Vehicles
Rural Population
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
PubMed ID
8083897 View in PubMed
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Abbreviated Injury Scale: not a reliable basis for summation of injury severity in trauma facilities?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122288
Source
Injury. 2013 May;44(5):691-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Kjetil G Ringdal
Nils Oddvar Skaga
Morten Hestnes
Petter Andreas Steen
Jo Røislien
Marius Rehn
Olav Røise
Andreas J Krüger
Hans Morten Lossius
Author Affiliation
Department of Research, Norwegian Air Ambulance Foundation, Drøbak, Norway. kjetil.ringdal@norskluftambulanse.no
Source
Injury. 2013 May;44(5):691-9
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abbreviated Injury Scale
Benchmarking
Clinical Coding
Female
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Male
Norway
Reproducibility of Results
Trauma Centers
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
Injury severity is most frequently classified using the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) as a basis for the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the New Injury Severity Score (NISS), which are used for assessment of overall injury severity in the multiply injured patient and in outcome prediction. European trauma registries recommended the AIS 2008 edition, but the levels of inter-rater agreement and reliability of ISS and NISS, associated with its use, have not been reported.
Nineteen Norwegian AIS-certified trauma registry coders were invited to score 50 real, anonymised patient medical records using AIS 2008. Rater agreements for ISS and NISS were analysed using Bland-Altman plots with 95% limits of agreement (LoA). A clinically acceptable LoA range was set at ± 9 units. Reliability was analysed using a two-way mixed model intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) statistics with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) and hierarchical agglomerative clustering.
Ten coders submitted their coding results. Of their AIS codes, 2189 (61.5%) agreed with a reference standard, 1187 (31.1%) real injuries were missed, and 392 non-existing injuries were recorded. All LoAs were wider than the predefined, clinically acceptable limit of ± 9, for both ISS and NISS. The joint ICC (range) between each rater and the reference standard was 0.51 (0.29,0.86) for ISS and 0.51 (0.27,0.78) for NISS. The joint ICC (range) for inter-rater reliability was 0.49 (0.19,0.85) for ISS and 0.49 (0.16,0.82) for NISS. Univariate linear regression analyses indicated a significant relationship between the number of correctly AIS-coded injuries and total number of cases coded during the rater's career, but no significant relationship between the rater-against-reference ISS and NISS ICC values and total number of cases coded during the rater's career.
Based on AIS 2008, ISS and NISS were not reliable for summarising anatomic injury severity in this study. This result indicates a limitation in their use as benchmarking tools for trauma system performance.
PubMed ID
22831922 View in PubMed
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Abdominal injuries in a low trauma volume hospital--a descriptive study from northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264480
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014;22:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Patrik Pekkari
Per-Olof Bylund
Hans Lindgren
Mikael Öman
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014;22:48
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Adolescent
Adult
Disease Management
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Mortality - trends
Hospitals, Low-Volume - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Injury Severity Score
Length of Stay - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Abdominal injuries occur relatively infrequently during trauma, and they rarely require surgical intervention. In this era of non-operative management of abdominal injuries, surgeons are seldom exposed to these patients. Consequently, surgeons may misinterpret the mechanism of injury, underestimate symptoms and radiologic findings, and delay definite treatment. Here, we determined the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of traumatic abdominal injuries at our hospital to provide a basis for identifying potential hazards in non-operative management of patients with these injuries in a low trauma volume hospital.
This retrospective study included prehospital and in-hospital assessments of 110 patients that received 147 abdominal injuries from an isolated abdominal trauma (n = 70 patients) or during multiple trauma (n = 40 patients). Patients were primarily treated at the University Hospital of Umeå from January 2000 to December 2009.
The median New Injury Severity Score was 9 (range: 1-57) for 147 abdominal injuries. Most patients (94%) received computed tomography (CT), but only 38% of patients with multiple trauma were diagnosed with CT
Notes
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Cites: J Trauma. 2000 Apr;48(4):624-7; discussion 627-810780593
Cites: J Trauma. 2000 Jul;49(1):56-61; discussion 61-210912858
Cites: Injury. 2002 Sep;33(7):617-2612208066
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Cites: Ann Surg. 1998 May;227(5):708-17; discussion 717-99605662
Cites: J Trauma. 1999 May;46(5):920-610338413
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Cites: Injury. 2008 Jan;39(1):21-917996869
Cites: J Trauma. 2008 Mar;64(3):656-63; discussion 663-518332805
Cites: J Trauma. 2008 Apr;64(4):943-818404060
Cites: J Trauma. 2008 Jun;64(6):1472-718545111
Cites: Injury. 2008 Nov;39(11):1275-8918715559
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2009;17:2219439091
Cites: J Trauma. 2011 Mar;70(3):626-921610353
Cites: J Surg Educ. 2013 Jan-Feb;70(1):129-3723337682
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:6622985447
Cites: Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 2013 May;95(4):241-523676806
Cites: J Surg Educ. 2013 Sep-Oct;70(5):618-2724016373
PubMed ID
25124882 View in PubMed
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Abductor Muscle Function and Trochanteric Tenderness After Hemiarthroplasty for Femoral Neck Fracture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281385
Source
J Orthop Trauma. 2016 Jun;30(6):e194-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Arkan S Sayed-Noor
Aleksandra Hanas
Olof G Sköldenberg
Sebastian S Mukka
Source
J Orthop Trauma. 2016 Jun;30(6):e194-200
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Femoral Neck Fractures - diagnosis - surgery
Follow-Up Studies
Hemiarthroplasty - adverse effects - methods
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Pain, Postoperative - diagnosis - therapy
Prospective Studies
Psoas Muscles - physiopathology
Risk assessment
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare the abductor muscle function and trochanteric tenderness in patients operated with hemiarthroplasty using the direct lateral (DL) or posterolateral (PL) approach for displaced femoral neck fracture.
Prospective cohort study.
A secondary teaching hospital.
We enrolled 183 hips operated with hemiarthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fracture using the DL or PL approach.
Preoperatively, we evaluated the Harris hip score (HHS) and European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D). At 1 year postoperatively, lucid patients were clinically examined to evaluate the Trendelenburg sign, abductor muscle strength with a dynamometer, and trochanteric tenderness with an electronic algometer. The 1-year HHS and EQ-5D were documented.
The primary outcome was the incidence of postoperative Trendelenburg sign, whereas the secondary outcomes included patients' reported limp, abductor muscle strength, trochanteric tenderness, HHS, and EQ-5D.
There were 48 patients (24 in the DL group and 24 in the PL group) who attended the 1-year clinical follow-up. The 2 groups were comparable (P > 0.05). The DL group showed a higher incidence of the Trendelenburg sign (9/24 vs. 1/24, P = 0.02) and limp (12/24 vs. 2/24, P = 0.004). Further analysis with logistic regression showed the surgical approach to be the only factor that resulted in the increment. No differences regarding HHS, EQ-5D, abductor muscle strength, algometer pressure pain threshold, and radiologic measurements were found (P > 0.05).
The incidence of the Trendelenburg sign and limp were significantly higher in the DL approach although this seemed not to influence abductor muscle strength or the incidence of trochanteric tenderness or compromise the clinical outcome.
Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
PubMed ID
27206260 View in PubMed
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The ability of the ICD-AIS map to identify seriously injured patients in road traffic accidents-A study from Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299598
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2018; 19(8):819-824
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Noora Airaksinen
Ilona Nurmi-Lüthje
Heikki Kröger
Peter Lüthje
Author Affiliation
a Faculty of Heath Sciences , University of Eastern Finland , Kuopio , Finland.
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2018; 19(8):819-824
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Abbreviated Injury Scale
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Medical Records - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In Finland, the severity of road traffic injuries is determined using the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Finnish Modification (ICD-10-FM) injury codes from Finnish Hospital Discharge data and the automatic conversion tool (ICD-AIS map) developed by the Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine (AAAM). The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of the ICD-AIS map to identify seriously injured patients due to traffic accidents in Finnish injury data by comparing the severity rating generated by an expert and by the ICD-AIS map.
Our data came from the North Kymi Hospital (level 2 trauma center at the time of the study). The data included 574 patients who were injured in traffic accidents during 2 years. The severity rating (Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale [MAIS] 3+) of each patient was recorded retrospectively by an expert based on information from patient records. In addition, the rating was generated from ICD-10 injury codes by the ICD-AIS map conversion tool. These 2 ratings were compared by road user categories and the strength of agreement was described using Cohen's kappa.
The proportion of seriously injured patients was 10.1% as defined by the expert and 6.6% as generated by the ICD-AIS map; exact agreement was 65.5%. The highest concordance was for pedestrians (exact agreement 100%) and the weakest for moped drivers and motorcyclists (46.7%). Furthermore, the overall strength of agreement of the severity ratings (slightly or seriously injured) between the expert and the ICD-AIS map was good (??=?0.70). Most (65%) of the conversion problems were misclassifications caused by the simplicity of the Finnish ICD-10 injury codes compared to the injury codes used in the ICD-AIS map. In Finland, the injuries are recorded mainly with 4-digit codes and, infrequently, with 5-digit codes, whereas the ICD-AIS map defines up to 6-digit codes.
For this sample of simplified ICD-10-FM codes, the ICD-AIS map underestimated the number of seriously injured patients. The mapping result could be improved if at least open and closed fractures of extremities and visceral contusions and ruptures had separate codes. In addition, there were a few injury codes that should be considered for inclusion in the map.
PubMed ID
30543466 View in PubMed
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[Accidents in day care institutions in Denmark during the 1990's]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32303
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Feb 19;163(8):1078-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-19-2001
Author
M. Kruse
Author Affiliation
Statens Institut for Folkesundhed, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Feb 19;163(8):1078-82
Date
Feb-19-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Child Day Care Centers - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Injury Severity Score
Male
Nurseries - statistics & numerical data
Play and Playthings - injuries
Registries
Sex Factors
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: This paper analyses the development in the incidence of injuries in day care institutions for children below school age in Denmark 1989-1997. MATERIAL: Data on injuries were collected from the injury register, which covers around 15 per cent of the Danish population. The population data derive from Statistics Denmark. METHOD: Incidence patterns were analysed by means of linear regressions and comparisons of means. RESULTS: Injuries in day care institutions for children below school age have increased sharply during the 1990s. In children aged 1-6, the 3-6-year-olds had a higher incidence and the boys a significantly higher incidence of injury than the girls. DISCUSSION: The increase in injuries is to some extent explained by a higher attendance at day care institutions. The hypothesis that the rising incidence is partly due to an increase in the tendency to seek emergency department treatment in the event of minor injuries cannot be ruled out, as minor injuries almost solely account for the rise.
PubMed ID
11242666 View in PubMed
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Acetabular fractures before and after the introduction of seatbelt legislation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211432
Source
Can J Surg. 1996 Aug;39(4):317-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
S. al-Qahtani
G. O'Connor
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Can J Surg. 1996 Aug;39(4):317-20
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetabulum - injuries
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Female
Fractures, Bone - classification - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Incidence
Injury Severity Score
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Retrospective Studies
Seat Belts - legislation & jurisprudence
Trauma Centers
Abstract
To compare the incidence and severity of acetabular fractures and associated injuries before and after seatbelt legislation.
A retrospective study.
Two major trauma centres, which are teaching hospitals.
Three hundred and ninety-three patients who sustained acetabular fractures during the 5 years before and 5 years after seatbelt legislation was enacted. Of these, the fractures in 198 patients (50.4%) resulted from a motor vehicle accident.
The number and severity of acetabular fractures and associated injuries.
There has been a significant reduction in the number of acetabular fractures (p = 0.005) since seatbelt use became mandatory, and the complexity of the fractures has decreased. There has also been a marked reduction in associated injuries, such as fractures of other bones, and head, chest and abdominal injuries (p
Notes
Comment In: Can J Surg. 1996 Aug;39(4):2668697314
PubMed ID
8697323 View in PubMed
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Source
Int J Sports Med. 2004 Apr;25(3):209-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
J. Parkkari
P. Kannus
A. Natri
I. Lapinleimu
M. Palvanen
M. Heiskanen
I. Vuori
M. Järvinen
Author Affiliation
Tampere Research Center of Sports Medicine, UKK Institute, Tampere, Finland. jari.parkkari@uta.fi
Source
Int J Sports Med. 2004 Apr;25(3):209-16
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Injury Severity Score
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to get reliable insight into injury risk in various commuting and lifestyle activities, as well as recreational and competitive sports. A cohort of 3 657 persons was randomly selected from the 15- to 74-year-old Finnish population. Ninety-two percent (n = 3 363) of the subjects accepted to participate the one-year follow-up, record all their physical activities that lasted 15 min or more, and register all acute and overuse injuries that occurred during these activities. To collect the information, the study subjects were interviewed by phone by the trained personnel of the Statistics Finland three times in four-month intervals. The individual injury risk per exposure time was relatively low, ranging from 0.19 to 1.5 per 1 000 hours of participation, in commuting and lifestyle activities including walking and cycling to work, gardening, home repair, hunting and fishing, and, in sports such as golf, dancing, swimming, walking, and rowing. The risk was clearly higher in squash, orienteering, and contact and team sports, such as judo, wrestling, karate, rinkball, floorball, basketball, soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, and Finnish baseball ranging from 6.6 to 18.3 per 1 000 hours of participation. However, the highest absolute number of injuries occurred in low-risk activities, such as gardening, walking, home-repair, and cycling, because they are performed so often. In conclusion, individual injury risk per exposure hours is relatively low in commuting and lifestyle activities compared to many recreational and competitive sports. However, at a population level, these low-to-moderate intensity activities are widely practised producing a rather high absolute number of injuries, and thus, preventive efforts are needed in these activities, too.
PubMed ID
15088246 View in PubMed
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500 records – page 1 of 50.