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Clinical experience with a new device that will simplify insulin injections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48874
Source
Diabetes Care. 1985 Jan-Feb;8(1):73-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
A S Berger
N. Saurbrey
C. Kühl
J. Villumsen
Source
Diabetes Care. 1985 Jan-Feb;8(1):73-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Trials
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Injections - instrumentation
Insulin - administration & dosage
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
In order to test clinically a newly developed, simple, and convenient device for giving multiple injections of short-acting insulin (Actrapid HM, Novo, Bagsvaerd, Denmark), 16 type I diabetic patients previously stabilized on intensified conventional therapy regimens participated in a randomized crossover study for a period of 6 wk. The patients used conventional syringes for injections of short-acting insulin during one period and the new device during the other. Conventional syringes were used for injections of basal insulin during both periods. Metabolic control was assessed by twice-weekly blood glucose profiles, HbA1c, and the frequency of hypoglycemic reactions; no significant differences were found during the two treatment periods. No infections at the injection sites were seen. Patients' evaluation of the new device was very positive.
PubMed ID
3882371 View in PubMed
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Clinical response and patient acceptance of a prefilled, disposable insulin pen injector for insulin-treated diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47966
Source
Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi (Taipei). 1999 Jul;62(7):455-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
H S Chen
C M Hwu
C F Kwok
H J Yang
K C Shih
B J Lin
L T Ho
Author Affiliation
Section of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Veterans General Hospital-Taipei, Taiwan, ROC.
Source
Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi (Taipei). 1999 Jul;62(7):455-60
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Over Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Injections - instrumentation
Insulin - administration & dosage
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical response and patient acceptance of a prefilled, disposable insulin pen injector (Novolet, Novo-Nordisk, Bagsvaerd, Denmark) for treating insulin-dependent diabetic patients. METHODS: After a run-in period of six weeks, 19 patients participated in an open, randomized, controlled, crossover study with two 12-week periods using insulin pens or conventional syringes. Clinical responses were assessed every 12 weeks, including glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), seven-point blood glucose profiles and hypoglycemic reactions. At the end of the trial, patients completed questionnaires about their acceptance of the insulin delivery device. RESULTS: Neither of the regimens rendered significant changes in HbA1c, blood glucose profiles or hypoglycemic episodes. Most of the study subjects reported that the prefilled, disposable devices were convenient and easy to use, and many of them wished to continue using the device for insulin delivery. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical response was the same for both treatment regimens, but most subjects preferred the prefilled disposable pen injector for insulin delivery because it was more convenient for daily use.
PubMed ID
10418181 View in PubMed
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Toronto hospital reduces sharps injuries by 80%, eliminates blood collection injuries. A case study: Toronto East General Hospital pioneers healthcare worker safety.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170151
Source
Healthc Q. 2006;9(1):68-70, 4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Laura Visser
Author Affiliation
Planning, Partnerships and Public Relations at Toronto East General Hospital.
Source
Healthc Q. 2006;9(1):68-70, 4
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Specimen Collection - instrumentation
Blood-Borne Pathogens
Equipment Design
Hospitals, Urban - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Infusions, Intravenous - instrumentation
Injections - instrumentation
Inservice training
Medical Laboratory Science - education
Needles
Needlestick Injuries - prevention & control
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Patient Care
Personnel, Hospital - education
Safety Management
Abstract
Needlestick and other sharps injuries are a key Canadian public health issue, affecting 70,000 people per year and costing some dollar 140 million. A safety program at Toronto East General Hospital--focusing on blood collection and patient injection--achieved an 80% reduction in injuries within one year (from 41 in 2003 to eight in 2004), with blood collection injuries eliminated entirely.
PubMed ID
16548437 View in PubMed
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