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980 records – page 1 of 98.

A 10 year follow up of parenteral gold therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14307
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 1996 Mar;55(3):169-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
G. Bendix
A. Bjelle
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 1996 Mar;55(3):169-76
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy
Comparative Study
Drug Tolerance
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gold Sodium Thiomalate - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Male
Middle Aged
Probability
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To study the long term tolerance of parenteral gold and subsequent drug treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, including prediction of outcome and 'survival' of sequential treatments. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of 376 patients was made, including a detailed screening of 237 patients treated in 1989. Reasons for discontinuing treatment were analysed in life table analyses, which were used to compare patients receiving parenteral gold treatment in 1985 and 1989, and two groups of patients receiving disease modifying antirheumatic drugs after parenteral gold treatment. The causes of discontinuation were followed in sequential treatments. RESULTS: The estimated probability of discontinuation of parenteral gold treatment was 29% after six months and 42%, 55%, 74%, and 92% after 1, 2, 5, and 10 years, respectively. Mucocutaneous side effects were the main cause of discontinuation of parenteral gold treatment during the first three years, while the probability of discontinuation because of inefficacy dominated after four years. Side effects also constituted the main cause of discontinuation of treatments given after parenteral gold treatment during the first three years of follow up. No significant differences were found when comparing the termination rates between the first and the second and subsequent treatments after parenteral gold treatment. The main reasons for discontinuing one treatment could not predict the cause of discontinuation of the next treatment. CONCLUSION: Mucocutaneous side effects dominated initially, while inefficacy was the dominating cause of discontinuation of long term parenteral gold treatment. No serious side effects were registered. The cause of discontinuation of one treatment did not predict the cause of discontinuation of the following drug. Drug 'survival' was the same in both treatments after parenteral gold treatment.
PubMed ID
8712879 View in PubMed
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Publication Type
Report
Date
2000
Author
Alaska HIV Prevention Planning Group
State of Alaska HIV/STD Program, DPH, Section of Epidemiology
Date
2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska AIDS cases
Chlamydia
Epidemiologic profile
Exposure risk
Gonorrhea
Hepatitis C infection
HIV/AIDS
IDU (injection drug use)
MSM (men who have sex with men)
Needs Assessment
Populations at risk
Risk behavior
Risk perception
Ryan White CARE Act (RWCA) services
Sexually transmitted diseases
Sociodemographics of Alaska
Syphilis
Abstract
The 2001-2003 Alaska HIV Prevention Plan describes the HIV epidemic in Alaska, provides information on populations at increased risk of infection, and recommends strategies to prevent further spread of HIV in Alaska. The HIV Prevention Plan also serves to guide uses of HIV prevention funds from the Centers forDisease Control and Prevention (CDC) within our state. This plan differs from previous plans developed by the Alaska HIV Prevention Planning Group in that it is more geographically specific, it strongly emphasizes populations at high risk, and it recommends specific interventions to reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS in Alaska.
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Publication Type
Report
Date
2003
Author
Alaska HIV Prevention Planning Group
State of Alaska HIV/STD Program, DPH, Section of Epidemiology
Date
2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Chlamydia
Community Services Assessment (CSA)
Epidemiologic profile
Gonorrhea
Hepatitis C virus infection
IDU (injection drug use)
MSM (men who have sex with men)
Partner notification
Prevention services
Risk behavior
Risk perception
Sexually transmitted diseases
Sociodemographics of Alaska
Substance use and abuse
Syphilis
Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS)
Abstract
The 2004-2006 Alaska HIV Prevention Plan is the fifth comprehensive plan produced by the Alaska HPPG. It describes the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS in Alaska and related risk factors, the populations at greatest need for HIV prevention interventions, and recommendations for interventions that are most appropriate to meet these needs. The Plan is designed to provide guidance for HIV prevention activities in all sectors and areas of Alaska for the next three years. It is intended to guide specific interventions for those at greatest risk of HIV infection; to generate community discussion and input; to encourage collaboration among individuals, organizations, and community groups providing HIV prevention and care; and to encourage integration of HIV prevention interventions into services for people likely to engage in risk behaviors -- all with the goal of preventing HIV and AIDS in Alaska.
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Abortion induced with methotrexate and misoprostol: a comparison of various protocols.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209155
Source
Contraception. 1997 Mar;55(3):159-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
E R Wiebe
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Colubmia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Contraception. 1997 Mar;55(3):159-63
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortifacient Agents, Nonsteroidal - administration & dosage
Abortion, Induced - methods - statistics & numerical data
Administration, Intravaginal
Administration, Oral
Adult
Canada
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Injections, Intramuscular
Methotrexate - administration & dosage
Misoprostol - administration & dosage
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Time Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
Seven hundred fifty-six women had abortions induced with methotrexate and misoprostol. Various protocols were compared. In Group 1, phase 1, after receiving 50 mg/m2 methotrexate IM, 289 women were randomized to receive either 750 or 500 micrograms of vaginal misoprostol. In Group 1, phase 2, 84 women who had failed to abort after one dose of misoprostol were randomized to receive either vaginal or oral routes for the second dose of misoprostol given on Day 8. In Group 2, a cohort of 226 women who received 60 mg/m2 methotrexate were compared to the 289 women who received 50 mg/m2 in Group 1. There were no differences in rates of effectiveness in the various trial groups. Side effects were greater with 60 mg/m2 of methotrexate. In Group 3, a cohort of 241 women received the misoprostol in three vaginal doses 8 hr apart starting on Day 5, and were compared to the 289 women in Group 1 receiving one vaginal dose. In women whose medical abortion failed, fetuses were found to have limb abnormalities In the total group of 756 women, 88.8% aborted successfully without surgical aspiration, with only minor side effects, and the acceptance rate was high. This study indicates that medical abortions induced with methotrexate and misoprostol are safe and effective, but more research is needed to find a more effective protocol.
PubMed ID
9115004 View in PubMed
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The absorption of subcutaneously injected short-acting soluble insulin: influence of injection technique and concentration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48905
Source
Diabetes Care. 1983 Sep-Oct;6(5):459-62
Publication Type
Article
Author
P. Hildebrandt
L. Sestoft
S L Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Hvidøre Hospital, Klampenborg, Denmark.
Source
Diabetes Care. 1983 Sep-Oct;6(5):459-62
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Adolescent
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - drug therapy - metabolism
Humans
Injections, Subcutaneous - methods
Insulin - administration & dosage - pharmacokinetics
Middle Aged
Temperature
Abstract
The effect of injection technique on the absorption of subcutaneously injected short-acting insulin [125I-labeled Actrapid (MC), Novo, Copenhagen, Denmark] was investigated in insulin-dependent diabetic patients. In one side of the abdomen insulin was given with a fixed standard technique. In the other side of the abdomen the temperature of the injected insulin, the depth of injection, and the duration of injection were varied. Furthermore, we compared the absorption of U40 and U100 insulin by giving either 8 U of the two insulins or 0.1 ml of both insulins simultaneously to the patients in either side of the abdomen. With regard to the injection technique the only significant finding was a faster absorption rate with deep (12 mm) than with superficial (3 mm) injection. The absorption of U100 insulin was significantly slower than of U40 insulin, when given in the same amount (8 U) as well as in the same volume (0.1 ml).
PubMed ID
6400706 View in PubMed
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[Abuse of intravenously injected drugs among persons arrested by the Stockholm police from 1965 to 1968].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110222
Source
Lakartidningen. 1969 Feb 19;66(8):781-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-19-1969
Author
N. Bejerot
Source
Lakartidningen. 1969 Feb 19;66(8):781-6
Date
Feb-19-1969
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Male
Social Problems
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden
PubMed ID
5769219 View in PubMed
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Accelerated onset of vecuronium neuromuscular block with pulmonary arterial administration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46523
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1994 Dec;41(12):1178-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
H. Iwasaki
M. Igarashi
S. Kawana
A. Namiki
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesiology, Sapporo Medical University, School of Medicine, Japan.
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1994 Dec;41(12):1178-80
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anesthesia, Intravenous
Catheterization, Peripheral
Comparative Study
Female
Fentanyl - administration & dosage
Heart Catheterization
Humans
Injections, Intra-Arterial
Male
Midazolam - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Muscle Contraction - drug effects - physiology
Neuromuscular Junction - drug effects
Pulmonary Artery
Reaction Time - drug effects
Time Factors
Ulnar Nerve - drug effects - physiology
Vecuronium Bromide - administration & dosage
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the onset times of vecuronium neuromuscular block administered into either the central circulation or a peripheral vein. One hundred and twenty adult patients with a pulmonary artery (PA) catheter were randomly divided into one of three groups with respect to the routes of vecuronium administration (n = 40 in each group). Anaesthesia was induced with midazolam 2.5 mg iv and fentanyl 10-50 micrograms.kg-1 iv and maintained with intermittent doses of fentanyl 50 micrograms iv and nitrous oxide 60-70% in oxygen. After immobilization of the forearm in a splint, the ulnar nerve was stimulated supramaximally every 12 sec. The resulting force of the evoked thumb twitch was recorded (Myograph 2000, Biometer, Denmark). The times from the injection to the first depression of twitch response (latent onset) in patients given vecuronium 0.08 mg.kg-1 into the pulmonary artery, the right atrium, and a peripheral vein on the hand were 58.0 +/- 19.5, 71.5 +/- 17.1, and 82.4 +/- 18.0 sec (mean +/- SD), respectively. The latent onset of neuromuscular block occurred sooner in patients given vecuronium into the central vein than when administered into a vein on the hand (P
PubMed ID
7867112 View in PubMed
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[Accidental administration of racemic adrenaline. Three life-threatening cases after intravenous injection in children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10909
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Mar 10;118(7):1080-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-1998
Author
B. Zeller
H J Bangstad
Author Affiliation
Barneavdelingen, Sentralsykehuset i Akershus, Nordbyhagen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Mar 10;118(7):1080-1
Date
Mar-10-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Emergencies
English Abstract
Epinephrine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Humans
Infant
Injections, Intravenous
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - drug therapy
Male
Medication Errors
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Abstract
The inhalation of racemic adrenalin is an important part of the treatment of inflammatory airway obstruction in children. In Norway during the last few years there have been several cases of adrenal solutions intended only for inhalation being accidentally administered as intravenous injections. The solution for inhalation contains an adrenalin concentration 110 times greater than the adrenalin intended for emergency use (0.1 mg/ml). The instant consequences of intravenous injections of inhalation adrenalin include arterial hypertension followed by hypotension, cardiac ischemia and cardiac insufficiency, pulmonary oedema, and respiratory failure and the need for artificial ventilation. The clinical picture in the three patients we describe was very dramatic. The injected doses were 0.16-1.1 mg l-adrenalin per kg body weight. All children survived without sequelae. In order to reduce the risk of accidentally administering intravenous injections of adrenalin intended for inhalation a set of guidelines is being proposed.
PubMed ID
9531834 View in PubMed
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Achievement of recommended treatment targets for bone and mineral metabolism in haemodialysis patients using paricalcitol: an observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136584
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2011 Apr;45(3):196-205
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Anders Fernström
Jan Giæver
Barbara Granroth
Britta Hylander
Gert Jensen
Anders Christensson
Björn Wikström
Lars Weiss
Ulf Wrege
Stefan H Jacobson
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, Linköping University/Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden. anders.fernstrom@lio.se
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2011 Apr;45(3):196-205
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biomarkers, Pharmacological - blood - metabolism
Bone Density - drug effects
Bone Density Conservation Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Bone Diseases, Metabolic - drug therapy - etiology - metabolism
Bone and Bones - metabolism
Calcium - blood
Chronic Disease
Ergocalciferols - administration & dosage - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary - complications - drug therapy - metabolism
Injections, Intravenous
Kidney Diseases - complications - metabolism - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Observation
Parathyroid Hormone - metabolism
Phosphorus - blood
Prospective Studies
Renal Dialysis
Sweden
Abstract
Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is a common problem among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on haemodialysis. This study was conducted to assess the use, effectiveness and safety of intravenous paricalcitol in haemodialysis patients with various degrees of SHPT.
This observational, multicentre, prospective study was conducted in 14 Swedish dialysis centres from May 2007 to June 2008 and included 92 haemodialysis patients with a diagnosis of SHPT associated with CKD. The decision to initiate treatment with intravenous paricalcitol was made by the treating physician. No treatment algorithms were provided.
Mean patient age was 64 years. Of the 92 patients included, 74 had an intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) level of >300 pg/ml at baseline. Median iPTH was 584 pg/ml in patients with a baseline PTH of >300 pg/ml. During follow-up there was a decrease in iPTH to 323 pg/ml at 6 months (-45%, p
PubMed ID
21366390 View in PubMed
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980 records – page 1 of 98.