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Alaska's approach to planning an emergency medical service system: how is it working three years later?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76569
Source
Pages 373-376 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
rapidly changing technology, rapid expansion of Alaska's service infrastructure, or in some cases, greater community capabilities than had once been realized. 6. The critical care categories re- ceiving attention have increased in number. 7. Detailed lists of recommended equipment for first
  1 document  
Author
Way, G. H.
Johnson, M. S.
Author Affiliation
Emergency Medical Services Section, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Juneau, Alaska
Source
Pages 373-376 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Date
1985
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska State Health Plan
EMS
Federal Government
Infrastructure
Regional centers
Sub-regional centers
Urban centers
Villages
Documents
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Source
Arctic Summer College. Arctic Circle Conference Discussion Session. Fellow Paper.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2015
THE ARCTIC DIGITAL DIVIDE ANDREAS KUERSTEN∗ I. Introduction For many, the Arctic’s harsh environment, remoteness, and sparse population are what make it so unique and beautiful. But these same qualities also make establishing reliable and fast telecommunications infrastructure in
  1 document  
Author
Kuersten, Andreas
Source
Arctic Summer College. Arctic Circle Conference Discussion Session. Fellow Paper.
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
208623
Keywords
Telecommunications
Arctic
Climate change
Infrastructure
Development
Abstract
For many, the Arctic’s harsh environment, remoteness, and sparse population are what make it so unique and beautiful. But these same qualities also make establishing reliable and fast telecommunications infrastructure in the region extremely difficult – particularly with regard to the North American Arctic. Indeed, these conditions make the installation of any telecommunications system, much less one with modern dependability and speed, an arduous undertaking. Yet connectivity is a necessity in the modern age and demands in the High North are only increasing. For example, governments and industry are seeking to expand services and operations northward as climate change opens up the once ice-locked region. In turn, locals aspire to interact with and take advantage of the opportunities of the wider world. Regardless of whether one appreciates or opposes the pace and forces behind northern development, Arctic telecommunications infrastructure – whether supplying basic services or facilitating personal and economic ambitions – is inadequate for both current and future demand.
Documents

Kuersten_ASC-Paper_0.pdf

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Arctic Telemedicine Project Final Report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100819
Source
Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies, University of Alaska Anchorage. August 2000.
Publication Type
Report
Date
Aug-2000
  1 website  
Author
Hild, CM
Author Affiliation
Arctic Telemedicine Project: Final report presented to the Sustainable Development Working Group of the Arctic Council
Source
Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies, University of Alaska Anchorage. August 2000.
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Alaska Federal Health Care Access Network (AFHCAN)
Alaska Telehealth Advisory Council
Arctic Council
Communication networks
Community interface
Extranet
Health professionals
Healthcare access
Internet
Intranet
Interoperability guidelines
Physical infrastructures
Software development
Sustainability planning
Telecommunications
Telemedicine
Training
Abstract
Accessing healthcare is a challenge for arctic residents when compared to the general populations of the eight nations making up this polar region. These far northern residents face physical difficulties, which include great distances, severe wind and cold, and extremes in light. These conditions can be demanding on the health of those who travel and can be harmful to the injured, ill, or infirm. In order for arctic communities to provide adequate healthcare, there must be a sustainable means of delivering this care at a distance. Telemedicine has been identified as the use of computers, telecommunication, and medical tools that allow physical parameters to be put into an electronic format. Although telemedicine is part of the larger telehealth concept, and is dependent on systems of telecommunication, it also involves tele-education and other distance delivery systems. The services that are needed and are being delivered at a distance are defining these remote arctic cities and villages as the "tele-community." Key contacts from each of the eight Arctic Council member nations and each of its four permanent participant indigenous people's groups provided insights and comments for the development of this report to Ministers.
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Arctic Telemedicine Project: Final report presented to the Sustainable Development Working Group of the Arctic Council

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100820
Source
Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies
Publication Type
Report
Date
Aug-2000
  1 website  
Author
Hild, CM
Source
Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Arctic Council
Community interface
Extranet
Health delivery
Health professionals
Internet
Intranet
Interoperability guidelines
Physical infrastructures
Telecommunications
Telehealth
Telemedicine
Training
Abstract
Accessing healthcare is a challenge for arctic residents when compared to the general populations of the eight nations making up this polar region. These far northern residents face physical difficulties, which include great distances, severe wind and cold, and extremes in light. These conditions can be demanding on the health of those who travel and can be harmful to the injured, ill, or infirm. In order for arctic communities to provide adequate healthcare, there must be a sustainable means of delivering this care at a distance. Telemedicine has been identified as the use of computers, telecommunication, and medical tools that allow physical parameters to be put into an electronic format. Although telemedicine is part of the larger telehealth concept, and is dependent on systems of telecommunication, it also involves tele-education and other distance delivery systems. The services that are needed and are being delivered at a distance are defining these remote arctic cities and villages as the "tele-community." Key contacts from each of the eight Arctic Council member nations and each of its four permanent participant indigenous people's groups provided insights and comments for the development of this report to Ministers.
Online Resources
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Building bridges with decision-makers: Rules for rural and remote health researchers

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101086
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2006 Jul-Sep;6(3):567
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-Sep 2006
Author
MacLeod, MLP
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing and Community Health Sciences Program, University of Northern British Columbia
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2006 Jul-Sep;6(3):567
Date
Jul-Sep 2006
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision-makers
Health Research
Integrative research infrastructures
Rural communities
Sustained relationships
Abstract
CONTEXT: Until recently, rural and remote health researchers have undertaken predominantly investigator-driven research. In Canada and elsewhere, major health research funding agencies have begun to expect researchers to incorporate into funding proposals, a well-developed plan for sharing research findings with decision-makers, those who can incorporate relevant findings into clinical practice, programs and services.ISSUE: The research arising from the interests of investigators, although frequently relevant to communities, too often has resulted in data extraction that parallels resource extraction from resource-based rural or remote communities. Such research can result in non-usable findings, and in the non-use of research findings by decision-makers.LESSONS LEARNED: In order that useful and usable knowledge is created, bridges need to be built between researchers and decision-makers. Six 'rules for researchers' are proposed to help build bridges with decision-makers: Rule 1. Engage the right decision-makers; Rule 2. Determine what's in it for you and for them; Rule 3. Develop a sustained relationship; Rule 4. Live in their world once in a while; Rule 5. Think of doing research differently; Rule 6. Build integrative research infrastructures
PubMed ID
16889469 View in PubMed
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Climate change and human health: Infrastructure impacts to small remote communities in the north

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49155
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):487-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
  1 website  
Author
Warren, JA
Berner, JE
Curtis, T
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Division of Environmental Health and Engineering, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. jwarren@anthc.org
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):487-97
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic
Climate change
Engineering
Human health
Infrastructure
Abstract
In northern regions, climate change can include changes in precipitation magnitude and frequency, reductions in sea ice extent and thickness, and climate warming and cooling. These changes can increase the frequency and severity of storms, flooding, or erosion; other changes may include drought or degradation of permafrost. Climate change can result in damage to sanitation infrastructure resulting in the spread of disease or threatening a community's ability to maintain its economy, geographic location and cultural tradition, leading to mental stress. Through monitoring of some basic indicators communities can begin to develop a response to climate change. With this information, planners, engineers, health care professionals and governments can begin to develop approaches to address the challenges related to climate change.
PubMed ID
16440611 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Healthy Alaskans 2000 : charting the course of public health for the decade.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289581
Source
Juneau : Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Administrative Services, Planning Section. 190 pages.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1994
Source
Juneau : Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Administrative Services, Planning Section. 190 pages.
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Public Health
Alaska
Government policy
Medicine, Preventive
Access to care
Health indicators and targets Health promotion Health protection Preventive services Public health infrastructure
Notes
ALASKA RA447.A4A45 1994
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Healthy Alaskans 2010, Volume I: Targets for improved health

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99145
Publication Type
Report
Date
Apr-2002
  1 website  
Author
Alaska Dept. of Health & Social Services, Division of Public Health
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Access to care
Health indicators and targets
Health promotion
Health protection
Preventive services
Public health infrastructure
Abstract
Healthy Alaskans 2010 is an important tool that can be used by organizations and communities to improve the health status of Alaskans, modify exposures to health risks, strengthen health care services, and reduce environmental and occupational hazards. The Division of Public Health will use the Healthy Alaskans 2010 process to track changes in the health status of Alaskans over the next 10 years, serve as a framework for health policy development, identify the best indicators of health status, set ambitious but achievable targets, and ensure the information gained is shared with all partners.
Notes
Print copy available in UAA/APU Consortium, Alaskana Collection: RA447.A4 H432 2002
Online Resources
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Healthy Alaskans 2010, Volume I: Targets for improved health--Executive summary

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99144
Publication Type
Report
Date
Dec-2001
  1 website  
Author
Alaska Dept. of Health & Social Services, Division of Public Health
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Access to care
Health indicators and targets
Health promotion
Health protection
Preventive services
Public health infrastructure
Abstract
Healthy Alaskans 2010 is an important tool that can be used by organizations and communities to improve the health status of Alaskans, modify exposures to health risks, strengthen health care services, and reduce environmental and occupational hazards. The Division of Public Health will use the Healthy Alaskans 2010 process to track changes in the health status of Alaskans over the next 10 years, serve as a framework for health policy development, identify the best indicators of health status, set ambitious but achievable targets, and ensure the information gained is shared with all partners.
Notes
Print copy available in UAA/APU Consortium, Alaskana Collection RA447.A4 H431 2001
Online Resources
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Integrating telehealth into Aboriginal healthcare: The Canadian experience

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6390
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Dec;63(4):401-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
  1 website  
Author
Muttitt, S
Vigneault, R
Loewen, L
Author Affiliation
MBTelehealth, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, Canada. smuttitt@ms.umanitoba.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Dec;63(4):401-14
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aboriginal telehealth
Administration
Alberta First Nations Telehealth Project (AFNTP)
Canada
Cross-jurisdictional services
First Nations communities
Human resources
Information communication technologies
Inuit
MBTelehealth Network
North American Indians
Sustainability
Technical infrastructure
Telehealth
Telemedicine
Abstract
Telehealth, the use of information communication technologies to deliver health care over distance, has been identified as a key mechanism for improving access to health services internationally. Canada is well suited to realize the benefits of telehealth particularly for individuals in remote, rural and isolated locations, many of whom are of Aboriginal descent. The health status of Canada's Aboriginal population is generally lower than that of the non-Aboriginal population emphasizing the need for new health care solutions. The challenges associated with implementing telehealth are not unique to Aboriginal settings but, in many instances, are more pronounced as a result of cultural, political and jurisdictional issues. These challenges are not insurmountable however, and there have been a number of successes in Canada to serve as a blueprint for a national strategy for sustainable Aboriginal telehealth. This review will highlight challenges and successes related to telehealth implementation in Canadian Aboriginal communities including: geography, technical infrastructure, human resources, cross-jurisdictional services, and community readiness. The need for champions within government, community and health care settings and the use of a needs-driven and integrated approach to implementation are highlighted. Several Canadian examples are provided including lessons learned within the MBTelehealth Network.
PubMed ID
15709315 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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14 records – page 1 of 2.