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14 records – page 1 of 2.

Comprehending disclosure: must patients understand the risks they run?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181379
Source
Med Law Int. 2000;4(2):97-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
Kevin Williams
Author Affiliation
Sheffield Hallam University, UK.
Source
Med Law Int. 2000;4(2):97-109
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communication
Comprehension
Disclosure - legislation & jurisprudence
Great Britain
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Liability, Legal
Malpractice
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians - legislation & jurisprudence
Risk
Abstract
It is well known that competent patients must be told about the risks of proposed medical procedures. This paper argues that recent professional guidelines and the law of negligence now take matters further by requiring doctors to take reasonable steps in an attempt to ensure that patients understand the risks they are being invited to run, so facilitating meaningful choices and the opportunity to give a properly informed consent.
PubMed ID
14983870 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Doct. 1980 Dec;46(12):64-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1980
Author
L E Rozovsky
F A Rozovsky
Source
Can Doct. 1980 Dec;46(12):64-6
Date
Dec-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Probability
Risk
Truth Disclosure
PubMed ID
10249308 View in PubMed
Less detail

Informed consent and the disclosure of risks of treatment: the Supreme Court of Canada decides.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244125
Source
Bioethics Q. 1981 Fall-Winter;3(3-4):156-62
Publication Type
Article

Informed consent in Canada: an empirical study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240622
Source
Osgoode Hall Law J. 1984;22(1):139-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
G B Robertson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Law, University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
Osgoode Hall Law J. 1984;22(1):139-61
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Disclosure - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Paternalism
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians
Questionnaires
Risk
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Abstract
The case of Reibl v. Hughes has significantly altered the law regarding informed consent in Canada. It might be expected, therefore, that its impact on the Canadian medical profession would be significant. However, in the first study to examine the practice of Canadian doctors in this respect, Professor Robertson concludes that the profession is largely unaware of either the decision or its importance. Further, the study examines doctors' current perceptions and opinions on the disclosure of risks to patients and the results, among others, raise serious questions regarding both the awareness and reception of important legal rulings.
PubMed ID
16044612 View in PubMed
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Informed consent: physician inexperience is a material risk for patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161780
Source
J Law Med Ethics. 2007;35(3):478-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Richard J Veerapen
Author Affiliation
University of Victoria, BC, Canada.
Source
J Law Med Ethics. 2007;35(3):478-85
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Competence
Disclosure - legislation & jurisprudence
Duty to Warn - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Physician Impairment
Physician-Patient Relations
Risk
Abstract
This paper examines the case for an expanded interpretation of the concept of "material risk" such that it necessitates voluntary disclosure of physician inexperience with a specific medical procedure. Informed consent law in the United States, Canada, and most commonwealth jurisdictions has become a driver of standards of risk disclosure by physicians during the informed consent process. The legal standard of risk disclosure expected of a physician hinges on the interpretation of the entity called "material risk." Any impairment of the physician related to drug usage, disease, or alcohol which compounds the risk of a procedure is very likely to be considered material by a patient. This paper argues that physician inexperience is a factor that a reasonable patient would attach significance to and that it should therefore be viewed as a "material risk" requiring disclosure.
PubMed ID
17714257 View in PubMed
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Informed consent: recent developments that affect you.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244354
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1981 Jul;58(7):35-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1981

Law reform survey--Part 7. Explaining the risks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245272
Source
Can Doct. 1980 Dec;46(12):40-2, 44-5, 48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1980
Author
P N Williamson
Source
Can Doct. 1980 Dec;46(12):40-2, 44-5, 48
Date
Dec-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Physicians
Probability
Questionnaires
Risk
Truth Disclosure
PubMed ID
10249307 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Aust Nurses J. 1981 Oct;11(4):23-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1981

Physicians and the minefield surrounding informed consent.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211272
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Aug 15;155(4):458-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-1996
Author
K. Capen
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Aug 15;155(4):458-60
Date
Aug-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arteries - surgery
Canada
Cerebrovascular Disorders - etiology
Chickenpox
Disclosure
Female
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Physician's Role
Physician-Patient Relations
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
Pregnant Women
Risk
Abstract
Most of the legal cases that follow the informed-consent standard set in recent court cases have involved surgical procedures. However, issues concerning a pregnant British Columbia mother who contracted chicken pox and whose child was subsequently born with severe medical complications demonstrate the complexity of medical decision making and the inadequacy of established legal requirements, especially when consent has dimensions beyond technical considerations usually associated with medical procedures. The problem physicians face, says lawyer Karen Capen, is to find a way to balance a range of professional responsibilities and the overriding fiduciary obligation to patients in matters associated with informed decision making and consent.
PubMed ID
8752070 View in PubMed
Less detail

14 records – page 1 of 2.