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282 records – page 1 of 29.

Adolescent minors, informed consent and health information privacy: balancing paternalism, health and autonomy in the reproductive health care context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160481
Source
Health Law Can. 2007 Aug;28(1):16-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007

After "Eve": whither proxy decision-making?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234575
Source
CMAJ. 1987 Oct 15;137(8):715-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-1987
Author
E H Kluge
Source
CMAJ. 1987 Oct 15;137(8):715-20
Date
Oct-15-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Decision Making
Ethics, Medical
Female
Humans
Infant
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Intellectual Disability
Jurisprudence
Male
Patient Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
One of the most difficult problems facing physicians is how to approach proxy decisions made on behalf of congenitally incompetent patients. The author considers two recent court cases that attempt to provide guidelines: Re Stephen Dawson, which opts for a substituted-judgement approach, and Eve v. Mrs E.) which injoins best-interests considerations. The author explores the impact of Eve v. Mrs. E. as superseding Re Stephen Dawson, considers its ethical implications and attempts to clarify the best-interests criterion by sketching some guidelines for its interpretation. In so doing, he tries to reconcile the two decisions by laying bare their common underlying ethical rationale. The author concludes by pointing out some ethically questionable implications of Eve v. Mrs. E. in the area of allocation of health care resources.
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Oct 15;129(8):815-86225505
Cites: Health Law Can. 1980 Autumn;1(3):49-5210309454
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 1978 Feb;8(1):21-3624618
Cites: Perspect Biol Med. 1974 Autumn;18(1):2-204438051
Cites: Am J Law Med. 1979 Winter;4(4):367-96507056
PubMed ID
3651942 View in PubMed
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AIDS-related risks in the health care setting: HIV testing of health care workers and patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221292
Source
Queens Law J. 1993;18(1):71-128
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
W F Flanagan
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Law, Queen's University, Canada.
Source
Queens Law J. 1993;18(1):71-128
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disclosure - legislation & jurisprudence
HIV Infections - diagnosis - transmission
Health Personnel - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - prevention & control
Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient - prevention & control
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Mandatory Testing - legislation & jurisprudence
Prejudice
Abstract
Do patients and health care workers have the legal right to know each other's HIV status? Professor Flanagan argues that they do not. Given that with appropriate precautions the risk of transmitting HIV in the health care setting is extremely small and that the discriminatory consequences of HIV disclosure can be extremely high, it is suggested that the right of a patient or a health care worker not to disclose their HIV status must outweigh the other's "right to know."
PubMed ID
16086490 View in PubMed
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Alzheimer disease ethics--informed consent and related issues in clinical trials: results of a survey among the members of the Research Ethics Committees in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71207
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2003 Jun;15(2):157-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Gunbrith Peterson
Anders Wallin
Author Affiliation
Janssen-Cilag AB, Sollentuna, Sweden.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2003 Jun;15(2):157-70
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - drug therapy
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Trials - ethics
Comorbidity
Data Collection
Ethics Committees
Ethics, Medical
Ethics, Research
Female
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Legal Guardians
Male
Mental Competency - legislation & jurisprudence
Middle Aged
Patient Participation - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Selection - ethics
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The rapid advances in biomedical sciences have induced special moral and ethical attitudes, which ought to be taken into account. One of the most essential issues is the principles for participation in research of subjects with reduced decision-making capacity. We conducted a questionnaire survey among members of the research ethics committees in Sweden to find out their attitudes to a range of ethical issues related to research on subjects with Alzheimer's disease. One hundred thirty-six of those approached responded (66%), and 117 of the responses (56%) were considered substantially complete. There were 16 questions with fixed reply alternatives. Some central questions concerned the informed consent process. With a few exceptions, there were no significant differences in attitudes between the experts and laypersons, between persons of different ages, and between men and women. However, women and laypersons were in general keener to preserve the patient's integrity and the experts were more willing than the laypersons to allow participation of subjects with dementia in placebo-controlled trials.
PubMed ID
14620074 View in PubMed
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An investigation of the construct of competence: a comparison of the FIT, the MacCAT-CA, and the MacCAT-T.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174651
Source
Law Hum Behav. 2005 Apr;29(2):229-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Patricia A Zapf
Ronald Roesch
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, The City University of New York, New York 10019, USA. pzapf@jjay.cuny.edu
Source
Law Hum Behav. 2005 Apr;29(2):229-52
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Criminal Law
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mental Competency - legislation & jurisprudence
Models, Statistical
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Prisoners - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Reproducibility of Results
Treatment Refusal - legislation & jurisprudence
United States
Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Abstract
The 1990s witnessed Supreme Court decisions in both Canada and the United States on issues of competence that went against longstanding case law, psychological research, and common sense. These decisions held that there is to be one standard for all types of criminal competencies. The present research attempts to investigate whether this is an appropriate assumption and thus tests whether there are one or more constructs that underlie different types of competence. Two divergent types of competence were examined, competence to stand trial (both Canadian and American conceptualizations) and competence to consent to treatment, to determine if these different types of competence share a common underlying construct. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test this question and results indicate that there is a common construct that underlies different types of competence.
PubMed ID
15912726 View in PubMed
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Attitudes to sharing personal health information in living kidney donation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144792
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 Apr;5(4):717-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Patricia Hizo-Abes
Ann Young
Peter P Reese
Phil McFarlane
Linda Wright
Meaghan Cuerden
Amit X Garg
Author Affiliation
London Kidney Clinical Research Unit, Room ELL-101, Westminster, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 4G5, Canada.
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 Apr;5(4):717-22
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information - legislation & jurisprudence
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Confidentiality - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy
Health Records, Personal
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Kidney Transplantation - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Living Donors - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Abstract
In living kidney donation, transplant professionals consider the rights of a living kidney donor and recipient to keep their personal health information confidential and the need to disclose this information to the other for informed consent. In incompatible kidney exchange, personal health information from multiple living donors and recipients may affect decision making and outcomes.
We conducted a survey to understand and compare the preferences of potential donors (n = 43), potential recipients (n = 73), and health professionals (n = 41) toward sharing personal health information (in total 157 individuals).
When considering traditional live-donor transplantation, donors and recipients generally agreed that a recipient's health information should be shared with the donor (86 and 80%, respectively) and that a donor's information should be shared with the recipient (97 and 89%, respectively). When considering incompatible kidney exchange, donors and recipients generally agreed that a recipient's information should be shared with all donors and recipients involved in the transplant (85 and 85%, respectively) and that a donor's information should also be shared with all involved (95 and 90%, respectively). These results were contrary to attitudes expressed by transplant professionals, who frequently disagreed about whether such information should be shared.
Future policies and practice could facilitate greater sharing of personal health information in living kidney donation. This requires a consideration of which information is relevant, how to put it in context, and a plan to obtain consent from all concerned.
Notes
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2003 Jul;3(7):830-412814474
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2009 Jul;9(7):1558-7319459792
Cites: Transplantation. 2004 Aug 27;78(4):491-215446304
Cites: Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-101357243
Cites: Can J Surg. 2004 Dec;47(6):408-1315646438
Cites: Transplantation. 2005 Mar 27;79(6 Suppl):S53-6615785361
Cites: HIV Med. 2006 Apr;7(3):133-916494626
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2006 Aug 1;145(3):185-9616880460
Cites: J Pers Assess. 2006 Dec;87(3):305-1617134338
Cites: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2006 Nov;1(6):1148-5317699340
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2008 Sep;8(9):1878-9018671676
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2008 Oct;23(10):3316-2418599559
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Mar 12;360(11):1096-10119279341
Cites: J Med Ethics. 2009 Apr;35(4):270-119332587
Cites: Kidney Int. 2009 May;75(10):1088-9819225540
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2004 Oct;4(10):1553-415367208
PubMed ID
20299371 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Nurse. 1996 Oct;92(9):55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
W. Corber
M. Silberfeld
A. Feldman
Author Affiliation
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, North York, Ontario.
Source
Can Nurse. 1996 Oct;92(9):55
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Baths - nursing
Canada
Confusion - nursing
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Mental Competency - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
Bathing incompetent patients can be a difficult experience, both for the patient and the nurse. When incompetent patients express a wish not to be bathed, or actively resist being bathed, it is even more stressful.
PubMed ID
9118064 View in PubMed
Less detail

282 records – page 1 of 29.