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149 records – page 1 of 15.

3,520 medication errors evaluated to assess the potential for IT-based decision support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133611
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2011;166:31-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Kristine Binzer
Annemarie Hellebek
Author Affiliation
Unit for Patient Safety, Capital Region of Denmark.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2011;166:31-7
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Support Systems, Clinical - organization & administration
Denmark
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration
Medication Errors - classification - statistics & numerical data
Software Design
Abstract
We have previously studied system failures involved in medication errors using a limited number of root cause analyses as source. The aim of this study was to describe a larger number of medication errors with respect to harm, involved medicines and involved system problems - thus providing information for the development of IT-based decision support. We evaluated 3,520 medication error reports derived from 12 months of consecutive reporting from 13 hospitals in the Capital Region of Denmark. We found 0.65% errors with serious harm and 16% with moderate harm. A small number of medicines were involved in the majority of the errors. The problems in the medication error process were heterogeneous. Some were related to specific medicines and others were related to the computerized order entry system. Accordingly decision support targeted at specific medicines and improved IT systems are part of the continuing work to reduce the frequency of medication errors.
PubMed ID
21685608 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of administrative data for identifying the presence and timing of admission to intensive care units in a Canadian province.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127694
Source
Med Care. 2012 Mar;50(3):e1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Allan Garland
Marina Yogendran
Kendiss Olafson
Damon C Scales
Kari-Lynne McGowan
Randy Fransoo
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. agarland@hsc.mb.ca
Source
Med Care. 2012 Mar;50(3):e1-6
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Critical Care - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Databases, Factual - standards
Hospital Information Systems - organization & administration - standards
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Manitoba
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
A prerequisite for using administrative data to study the care of critically ill patients in intensive care units (ICUs) is that it accurately identifies such care. Only limited data exist on this subject.
To assess the accuracy of administrative data in the Canadian province of Manitoba for identifying the existence, number, and timing of admissions to adult ICUs.
For the period 1999 to 2008, we compared information about ICU care from Manitoba hospital abstracts, with the criterion standard of a clinical ICU database that includes all admissions to adult ICUs in its largest city of Winnipeg. Comparisons were made before and after a national change in administrative data requirements that mandated specific data elements identifying the existence and timing of ICU care.
In both time intervals, hospital abstracts were extremely accurate in identifying the presence of ICU care, with positive predictive values exceeding 98% and negative predictive values exceeding 99%. Administrative data correctly identified the number of separate ICU admissions for 93% of ICU-containing hospitalizations; inaccuracy increased with more ICU stays per hospitalization. Hospital abstracts were highly accurate for identifying the timing of ICU care, but only for hospitalizations containing a single ICU admission.
Under current national-reporting requirements, hospital administrative data in Canada can be used to accurately identify and quantify ICU care. The high accuracy of Manitoba administrative data under the previous reporting standards, which lacked standardized coding elements specific to ICU care, may not be generalizable to other Canadian jurisdictions.
PubMed ID
22270100 View in PubMed
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[Actual problems of technical and metrological support of the extreme medicine service in Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195773
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2000 Dec;321(12):13-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000

Adding up provincial expenditures on health care for Manitobans: a POPULIS project. Population Health Information System.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201448
Source
Med Care. 1999 Jun;37(6 Suppl):JS60-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
M. Shanahan
C. Steinbach
C. Burchill
D. Friesen
C. Black
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation, University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW, Australia.
Source
Med Care. 1999 Jun;37(6 Suppl):JS60-82
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Female
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research
Health Status Indicators
Home Care Services - economics
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Infant
Information Systems - organization & administration
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Mental Health Services - economics
Middle Aged
Mortality
Needs Assessment
Nursing Homes - economics
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Using the POPULIS framework, this project estimated health care expenditures across the entire population of Manitoba for inpatient and outpatient hospital utilization, physician visits, mental health inpatient, and nursing home utilization.
This estimated expenditure information was then used to compare per capita expenditures relative to premature mortality rates across the various areas of Manitoba.
Considerable variation in health care expenditures was found, with those areas having high premature mortality rates also having higher health care expenditures.
PubMed ID
10409018 View in PubMed
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An activity-theoretical method for studying user participation in IS design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183365
Source
Methods Inf Med. 2003;42(4):398-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
S. Hyysalo
J. Lehenkari
Author Affiliation
Center for Activity Theory and Developmental Work Research, Department of Education, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 47 FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland. sampsa.hyysalo@helsinki.fi
Source
Methods Inf Med. 2003;42(4):398-404
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Consumer Participation
Databases as Topic - organization & administration
Diabetes Mellitus - therapy
Disease Management
Finland
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration
Models, Theoretical
Software Design
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
This paper aims to present an activity-theoretical method for studying the effects of user participation in IS development.
This method is developed through a case study of the process of designing a diabetes database.
The method consists of a historical analysis of the design process, an ethnographical study of the use of the database, and researcher-driven interventions into the on-going user-producer interaction. In the historical analysis, we study particularly which user groups of the database have influenced the design work and which perspectives need to be incorporated into the design in the near future. An analytical model consisting of perspectives on local design, particular technology, and societal domain is introduced as a conceptual tool for this analysis. We also introduce the possibility of employing the historical analysis in guiding an ethnographical study of the user sites and researcher-driven interventions, which provide the participants with tools for improving their design process.
PubMed ID
14534640 View in PubMed
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Analysing the diffusion and adoption of mobile IT across social worlds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259650
Source
Health Informatics J. 2014 Jun;20(2):87-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Jeppe Agger Nielsen
Shegaw Anagaw Mengiste
Source
Health Informatics J. 2014 Jun;20(2):87-103
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cell Phones
Computers, Handheld
Denmark
Diffusion of Innovation
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration
Social Networking
State Medicine - organization & administration
Abstract
The diffusion and adoption of information technology innovations (e.g. mobile information technology) in healthcare organizations involves a dynamic process of change with multiple stakeholders with competing interests, varying commitments, and conflicting values. Nevertheless, the extant literature on mobile information technology diffusion and adoption has predominantly focused on organizations and individuals as the unit of analysis, with little emphasis on the environment in which healthcare organizations are embedded. We propose the social worlds approach as a promising theoretical lens for dealing with this limitation together with reports from a case study of a mobile information technology innovation in elderly home care in Denmark including both the sociopolitical and organizational levels in the analysis. Using the notions of social worlds, trajectories, and boundary objects enables us to show how mobile information technology innovation in Danish home care can facilitate negotiation and collaboration across different social worlds in one setting while becoming a source of tension and conflicts in others. The trajectory of mobile information technology adoption was shaped by influential stakeholders in the Danish home care sector. Boundary objects across multiple social worlds legitimized the adoption, but the use arrangement afforded by the new technology interfered with important aspects of home care practices, creating resistance among the healthcare personnel.
PubMed ID
24810724 View in PubMed
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[An improvement in information support in the interests of the epidemiological health welfare of the troops].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216762
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1994 Dec;(12):37-42, 80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
I A Borisenko
Iu E Viazovichenko
V I Gudkov
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1994 Dec;(12):37-42, 80
Date
Dec-1994
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automatic Data Processing - organization & administration - standards
Computer Systems
Epidemiology - organization & administration
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration - standards
Military Hygiene - organization & administration
Russia
Abstract
The information acquisition, decision-making and control system must be the basic tool for optimizing the information procedures in the interests of sanitary-epidemiological welfare of troops. It's necessary to make a thorough revision of the existing account and record documentation in order to study its value. Each pattern of record cards must be scientifically substantiated depending on its effectiveness for further decision making. It's necessary to exclude all futile information. Record and account procedures must be automated and computerized throughout all chains of command beginning from a single military unit. Special systems must be developed for this matter. Realization of these goals will completely assure the monitoring of health status indices of servicemen and the environmental situation, as well as monitoring of risk factors influence upon the health of personnel.
PubMed ID
7900317 View in PubMed
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[An interesting experience on the use of information and population data bases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126466
Source
Rev Calid Asist. 2012 Sep-Oct;27(5):288-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Expósito
A P Johnson
Author Affiliation
Departamento de Radiología y Medicina Física, Universidad de Granada, Granada, España. jose.exposito.sspa@juntadeandalucia.es
Source
Rev Calid Asist. 2012 Sep-Oct;27(5):288-94
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes
Computer User Training
Confidentiality
Databases, Factual
Health Services Research
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration
Models, Theoretical
National health programs - organization & administration
Ontario
Publications
Research Personnel
Research Support as Topic
Abstract
In order to support decisions and analyze outcomes, the Spanish Health System has shown a great interest in developing data bases and high quality information systems. Nevertheless the use of these data bases are limited, not very systematized and, some times, their accessibility may be difficult.
We describe in this review the experience in using the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Science (ICES, Ontario, Canada) as an efficient model to improve the usefulness of these data bases.
Under restrictive conditions of confidentiality and privacy, the ICES has the legal capacity to use several population based data bases, for research projects and reports. ICES's functional structure (with an administrative and scientific level) is an interesting framework since it guarantees its independent and economic assessment.
To date, its scientific production has been high in many areas of knowledge and open to those interested, with points of view of many health care professionals (including management), for whom the quality of research is of the ultimate importance, to be able to access these resources.
PubMed ID
22386797 View in PubMed
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149 records – page 1 of 15.