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127 records – page 1 of 13.

Academic screencasting: internet-based dissemination of ophthalmology grand rounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137424
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2011 Feb;46(1):72-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Roshan Razik
Zaid Mammo
Harmeet S Gill
Wai-Ching Lam
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont, Canada.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2011 Feb;46(1):72-6
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Internet
Internship and Residency
Ontario
Ophthalmology - education
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Teaching - methods
Teaching Rounds - methods
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To evaluate and compare the preferences and attitudes of Ontario ophthalmologists and ophthalmology residents toward screencasting as an educational tool with potential use for continuing medical education (CME) events.
Cross-sectional study.
Eighty of 256 participants completed the survey.
The surveys were sent to participants by email, with follow-up via telephone. Study participants were urban and rural Ontario ophthalmologists, registered with the Canadian Ophthalmological Society, and University of Toronto ophthalmology residents. Pre-recorded online presentations-screencasts-were used as the main intervention. Online surveys were used to measure multiple variables evaluating the attitudes of the participants toward screencasting. This data was then used for further quantitative and qualitative analysis.
Over 95% of participants replied favourably to the introduction and future utilization of screencasting for educational purposes. Rural ophthalmologists were the most enthusiastic about future events. Practising in rural Ontario was associated with a higher interest in live broadcasts than practising in urban centres (p
PubMed ID
21283162 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' knowledge with internet-based education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125471
Source
Methods Inf Med. 2012;51(4):295-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Katja Heikkinen
H. Leino-Kilpi
S. Salanterä
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Vanhalinna, Finland. katja.heikkinen@utu.fi
Source
Methods Inf Med. 2012;51(4):295-300
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Care - methods
Chi-Square Distribution
Educational Measurement - methods
Educational Status
Empirical Research
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Educational
Orthopedics - methods
Patient Education as Topic
Statistics as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
There is a growing need for patient education and an evaluation of its outcomes.
The aim of this study was to compare ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' knowledge with Internet-based education and face-to-face education with a nurse. The following hypothesis was proposed: Internet-based patient education (experiment) is as effective as face-to-face education with a nurse (control) in increasing patients' level of knowledge and sufficiency of knowledge. In addition, the correlations of demographic variables were tested.
The patients were randomized to either an experiment group (n = 72) or a control group (n = 75). Empirical data were collected with two instruments.
Patients in both groups showed improvement in their knowledge during their care. Patients in the experiment group improved their knowledge level significantly more in total than those patients in the control group. There were no differences in patients' sufficiency of knowledge between the groups. Knowledge was correlated especially with patients' age, gender and earlier ambulatory surgeries.
As a conclusion, positive results concerning patients' knowledge could be achieved with the Internet-based education. The Internet is a viable method in ambulatory care.
PubMed ID
22476362 View in PubMed
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AMWA's role in women's health curriculum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154330
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2008 Dec;17(10):1555
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Janice Werbinski
Author Affiliation
American College of Women's Health Physicians, Inc., Portage, Michigan 49002, USA. drwerb@aol.com
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2008 Dec;17(10):1555
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Curriculum
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Internet - organization & administration
United States
Women's health
Women's Health Services - organization & administration
PubMed ID
19000031 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of the quality of epilepsy education on the Canadian World Wide Web.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172097
Source
Epilepsy Behav. 2006 Feb;8(1):299-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Jorge G Burneo
Author Affiliation
Epilepsy Programme, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada. jburneo2@uwo.ca
Source
Epilepsy Behav. 2006 Feb;8(1):299-302
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Epilepsy
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Information Services - standards
Internet - standards
Patient Education as Topic - methods - standards
Abstract
Despite the substantial amount of epilepsy-related information available on the Internet, little is known about its quality. Epilepsy-related information in English on the Canadian Internet was reviewed.
Popular search engines (google.ca, yahoo.ca, ca.altavista.com, simpatico.msn.ca) were interrogated. Web sites aimed primarily at patient and family education, geared toward human epilepsy, and epilepsy in general as opposed to one specific type or aspect of epilepsy, were included. Web sites were then subdivided in to proprietary (directly sponsored by the industry) and nonproprietary, and evaluated according to compliance with the principles of the Health on the Net (HON) Foundation Code of Conduct. Web sites without comprehensive contents were excluded. Comparison between total scores was done using the rank test. Categorized descriptors were assessed with t tests.
Five proprietary and fourteen nonproprietary websites were identified. None of them were compliant with all eight principles of the HON code. The average number of principles with which these sites were in compliance was 3.3 (range: 1-6.5, P = 0.4, proprietary vs nonproprietary).
The Internet has the potential to be a very powerful educational tool for patients with epilepsy. However, most of the easily accessed epilepsy web sites do not comply with accepted standards for health web sites.
PubMed ID
16275110 View in PubMed
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An overview of the British Columbia Glomerulonephritis network and registry: integrating knowledge generation and translation within a single framework.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106448
Source
BMC Nephrol. 2013;14:236
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sean Barbour
Monica Beaulieu
Jagbir Gill
Ognjenka Djurdjev
Heather Reich
Adeera Levin
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Sean.Barbour@vch.ca.
Source
BMC Nephrol. 2013;14:236
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Community Networks - statistics & numerical data
Glomerulonephritis - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Prevalence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Systems Integration
Translational Medical Research - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Glomerulonephritis (GN) is a group of rare kidney diseases with a substantial health burden and high risk of progression to end-stage renal disease. Research in GN has been limited by poor availability of large comprehensive registries. Substantial variations in access to and administration of treatment and outcomes in GN have been described. Leveraging provincial resources and existing infrastructure, the British Columbia (BC) GN Network is an initiative which serves to combine research and clinical care objectives. The goal of the BC GN Network is to coordinate and improve health care, including robust data capture, on all patients with GN in BC, a Canadian province of over 4.6 million people. This provincial initiative will serve as a model for Canadian or other national and international endeavours.
The BC Provincial Renal Agency (BCPRA) is the provincial governmental agency responsible for health delivery for all kidney patients in BC. The BC GN Network has been created by the BCPRA to ensure high quality and equitable access to care for all patients with GN and is a platform for evidence based clinical care programs and associated health policy. All patients with biopsy-proven GN are registered at the time of kidney biopsy into the BCPRA provincial database of kidney disease patients, forming the BC GN Registry. Thereafter, all laboratory results and renal related outcomes are captured automatically. Histology data and core clinical variables are entered into the database. Additional linkages between the GN Registry and administrative databases ensure robust capture of medications, hospital admissions, health care utilization, comorbidities, cancer and cardiac outcomes, and vital statistics.
The BC GN Network and Registry is a unique model in that it combines robust data capture, data linkages, and health care delivery and evaluation into one integrated system. This model utilizes existing health infrastructure to prospectively capture population level data on patients with GN, producing a rich dataset capable of real-time identification and evaluation of GN health policy initiatives, of supporting observational cohort studies and health services research in GN, and of facilitating patient recruitment into GN clinical trials.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24168011 View in PubMed
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Are benefits and harms in mammography screening given equal attention in scientific articles? A cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77117
Source
BMC Med. 2007;5:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Jørgensen Karsten Juhl
Klahn Anders
Gøtzsche Peter C
Author Affiliation
The Nordic Cochrane Centre, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, Copenhagen, Denmark. kj@cochrane.dk
Source
BMC Med. 2007;5:12
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Conflict of Interest
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Journalism, Medical
Mammography - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Mass Screening - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Periodicals - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The CONSORT statement specifies the need for a balanced presentation of both benefits and harms of medical interventions in trial reports. However, invitations to screening and newspaper articles often emphasize benefits and downplay or omit harms, and it is known that scientific articles can be influenced by conflicts of interest. We wanted to determine if a similar imbalance occurs in scientific articles on mammography screening and if it is related to author affiliation. METHODS: We searched PubMed in April 2005 for articles on mammography screening that mentioned a benefit or a harm and that were published in 2004 in English. Data extraction was performed by three independent investigators, two unblinded and one blinded for article contents, and author names and affiliation, as appropriate. The extracted data were compared and discrepancies resolved by two investigators in a combined analysis. We defined three groups of authors: (1) authors in specialties unrelated to mammography screening, (2) authors in screening-affiliated specialties (radiology or breast cancer surgery) who were not working with screening, or authors funded by cancer charities, and (3) authors (at least one) working directly with mammography screening programmes. We used a data extraction sheet with 17 items described as important benefits and harms in the 2002 WHO/IARC-report on breast cancer screening. RESULTS: We identified 854 articles, and 143 were eligible for the study. Most were original research. Benefits were mentioned more often than harms (96% vs 62%, P
PubMed ID
17537243 View in PubMed
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Assessing the effectiveness of informational video clips on Iranian immigrants' attitudes toward and intention to use the BC HealthGuide Program in the greater Vancouver area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164147
Source
MedGenMed. 2007;9(1):12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Iraj Poureslami
Irving Rootman
Ellen Balka
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Promotion Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. pouresla@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
MedGenMed. 2007;9(1):12
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
British Columbia - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Follow-Up Studies
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Interviews as Topic - methods
Iran - ethnology
Middle Aged
Television
Video Recording - methods
Abstract
Consumer-directed health information resources hold great potential for improving public health and easing the demand on health systems. Their value, however, depends largely on the ability of their intended users to access and use them effectively. Little is known about whether British Columbia's ethnocultural communities are using the British Columbia (BC) Ministry of Health's BC HealthGuide (BCHG) program, and if so, when and for what purposes they use the services, as well as level of satisfaction with and users' perceptions of the resources. This study investigated attitudes toward and perceptions of the BCHG program, as well as use patterns and satisfaction levels, within the Iranian community of the Greater Vancouver Area (GVA)--among BC's largest and fastest-growing Middle Eastern immigrant communities--and explored a model for introducing the BCHG program to ethnic communities in the GVA and BC.
In a 2-stage quasi-experimental design, with a combination of quantitative and qualitative research methods, data obtained from structured telephone surveys, in-person interviews, and focus groups involving a randomly selected sample of the target population were analyzed before and after intervention with audiovisual health information: a series of culturally relevant informative video clips developed by direct participation of the community and aired on local television channels in the fall of 2004.
There was low awareness and low utilization of the BCHG program among participants at the beginning of this study. Furthermore, many participants in the initial stage of this study cautioned that self-care resources in general are unsuited to Iranian culture, due to widespread distrust of health advice received via telephone or the Internet, and due to the strong value placed on health advice received directly from a professional medical doctor. Nonetheless, attitudes, perceptions, and self-reported utilization rates of the BCHG program improved substantially among the participants of this study following the screening of culturally appropriate, targeted promotional videos. Participants almost unanimously reported that watching the videos had encouraged them to use the BCHG program, and that they intended to promote the resources to others. In addition, the majority of participants who had accessed at least one of the BCHG program resources reported being satisfied with the services that they had received, and improved utilization rates were maintained at the follow-up focus group stage. At the same time, participants cautioned that gaining the confidence of the wider Iranian community in BC and increasing service utilization will require considerable time and effort. In particular, they suggested using a variety of media and communication channels, carefully selecting the health messengers, and targeting messages to specific community subgroups.
The findings of this study strongly suggest that Iranians living in the GVA are open to alternatives to routine healthcare services, including the use of preventive and self-care resources. However, awareness levels and utilization rates of the BCHG program among the GVA's Iranian immigrant population have until now been low. The noticeable and sustained improvement to attitudes, perceptions, and self-reported utilization rates of the BCHG program among Iranian participants in this study after watching culturally appropriate promotional videos indicates the potential to modify cultural beliefs in regard to the delivery of preventive health information if the relevant messages are delivered appropriately. By carefully considering the demographic and cultural characteristics of the various ethnic communities living in BC, and by targeting promotional activities and services directly to these individual communities, the BCHG program could improve awareness and utilization rates within these communities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17435621 View in PubMed
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Availability of antidotes in Quebec hospitals before and after dissemination of guidelines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182568
Source
Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2003 Nov 15;60(22):2345-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2003
Author
Benoit Bailey
Jean-François Bussières
Marc Dumont
Author Affiliation
Divisions of Emergency Medicine and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Department of Pediatrics, St. Justine Hospital, University of Montreal (UM), Montreal, Canada. bailey@total.net
Source
Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2003 Nov 15;60(22):2345-9
Date
Nov-15-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antidotes - supply & distribution - therapeutic use
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Inventories, Hospital
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - standards
Poisoning - drug therapy
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Quebec
PubMed ID
14652984 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer information dissemination strategies--finding out what works.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158695
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2007;17(4):206-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Margaret I Fitch
Irene Nicoll
Sue Keller-Olaman
Author Affiliation
Sunnybrook & Women s Health Sciences Centre, Toronto. irene.nicoll@sunnybrook.ca
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2007;17(4):206-18
Date
2007
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Benchmarking
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control - psychology
Community Health Planning
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Oncology Nursing - organization & administration
Ontario
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Support
Survivors - psychology
Abstract
This study aimed to identify the best strategies for dissemination of information about breast cancer In November 2004, 28 breast cancer survivors were interviewed. Three themes emerged from these discussions: the shock of diagnosis; the onus being on the patient to search for information; and the different types of information that breast cancer survivors want. To learn multiple viewpoints, 12 focus groups were held with breast cancer survivors (n = 127) and three focus groups were conducted with information providers (n = 25) in the spring of 2005. Participants validated the themes and identified two programs using "best practices" to provide information for women dealing with breast cancer. This article highlights the study findings, including implications for practice, education, and research.
PubMed ID
18286993 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer on the Internet: the quality of Swedish breast cancer websites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17465
Source
Breast. 2004 Oct;13(5):376-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Elisabeth Nilsson-Ihrfelt
Marie-Louise Fjällskog
Carl Blomqvist
Johan Ahlgren
Per Edlund
Jörgen Hansen
Lena Malmberg
Kenneth Villman
Gerhard Andersson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Box 1225, SE-751 42 Uppsala, Sweden. elisabeth.nilsson-ihrfelt@psyk.uu.se
Source
Breast. 2004 Oct;13(5):376-82
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms
Female
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Internet
Quality of Health Care
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the quality of Swedish-language breast cancer information available on the Internet. The questions explored were the extent and type of breast cancer information available, the coverage and correctness of that information, and whether the websites fulfilled the European Commission quality criteria for health-related websites. Three search engines were used to find websites containing medical information on breast cancer. An oncologist then evaluated the 29 relevant sites. Only seven of these were judged suitable for breast cancer patients. The coverage and correctness of the medical information varied considerably. None of the websites fulfilled the European Commission quality criteria. Therefore, considerable effort will be required before the Internet can serve as a valuable and up-to-date source of information on breast cancer for both professionals and laypersons. Our findings broadly match the results of earlier studies of English-language websites.
PubMed ID
15454192 View in PubMed
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127 records – page 1 of 13.