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The 2009 H1N1 pandemic response in remote First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario: barriers and improvements from a health care services perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130157
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nadia A Charania
Leonard J S Tsuji
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. ncharani@uwaterloo.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Catchment Area (Health)
Federal Government
Female
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Information Dissemination
Male
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pandemics - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Professional-Patient Relations
Retrospective Studies
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
To retrospectively examine the barriers faced and opportunities for improvement during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic response experienced by participants responsible for the delivery of health care services in 3 remote and isolated Subarctic First Nation communities of northern Ontario, Canada.
A qualitative community-based participatory approach.
Semi-directed interviews were conducted with adult key informants (n=13) using purposive sampling of participants representing the 3 main sectors responsible for health care services (i.e., federal health centres, provincial hospitals and Band Councils). Data were manually transcribed and coded using deductive and inductive thematic analysis.
Primary barriers reported were issues with overcrowding in houses, insufficient human resources and inadequate community awareness. Main areas for improvement included increasing human resources (i.e., nurses and trained health care professionals), funding for supplies and general community awareness regarding disease processes and prevention.
Government bodies should consider focusing efforts to provide more support in terms of human resources, monies and education. In addition, various government organizations should collaborate to improve housing conditions and timely access to resources. These recommendations should be addressed in future pandemic plans, so that remote western James Bay First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario and other similar communities can be better prepared for the next public health emergency.
PubMed ID
22030007 View in PubMed
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Academic screencasting: internet-based dissemination of ophthalmology grand rounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137424
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2011 Feb;46(1):72-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Roshan Razik
Zaid Mammo
Harmeet S Gill
Wai-Ching Lam
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont, Canada.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2011 Feb;46(1):72-6
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Internet
Internship and Residency
Ontario
Ophthalmology - education
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Teaching - methods
Teaching Rounds - methods
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To evaluate and compare the preferences and attitudes of Ontario ophthalmologists and ophthalmology residents toward screencasting as an educational tool with potential use for continuing medical education (CME) events.
Cross-sectional study.
Eighty of 256 participants completed the survey.
The surveys were sent to participants by email, with follow-up via telephone. Study participants were urban and rural Ontario ophthalmologists, registered with the Canadian Ophthalmological Society, and University of Toronto ophthalmology residents. Pre-recorded online presentations-screencasts-were used as the main intervention. Online surveys were used to measure multiple variables evaluating the attitudes of the participants toward screencasting. This data was then used for further quantitative and qualitative analysis.
Over 95% of participants replied favourably to the introduction and future utilization of screencasting for educational purposes. Rural ophthalmologists were the most enthusiastic about future events. Practising in rural Ontario was associated with a higher interest in live broadcasts than practising in urban centres (p
PubMed ID
21283162 View in PubMed
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Access Governance for Biobanks: The Case of the BioSHaRE-EU Cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279361
Source
Biopreserv Biobank. 2016 Jun;14(3):201-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Jane Kaye
Linda Briceño Moraia
Colin Mitchell
Jessica Bell
Jasper Adriaan Bovenberg
Anne-Marie Tassé
Bartha Maria Knoppers
Source
Biopreserv Biobank. 2016 Jun;14(3):201-6
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Specimen Banks - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Biomedical Research - legislation & jurisprudence
Cooperative Behavior
Databases, Factual
European Union
Finland
Germany
Humans
Information Dissemination - legislation & jurisprudence
Interprofessional Relations
Netherlands
Norway
United Kingdom
Abstract
Currently, researchers have to apply separately to individual biobanks if they want to carry out studies that use samples and data from multiple biobanks. This article analyzes the access governance arrangements of the original five biobank members of the Biobank Standardisation and Harmonisation for Research Excellence in the European Union (BioSHaRE-EU) project in Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, and the United Kingdom to identify similarities and differences in policies and procedures, and consider the potential for internal policy "harmonization." Our analysis found differences in the range of researchers and organizations eligible to access biobanks; application processes; requirements for Research Ethics Committee approval; and terms of Material Transfer Agreements relating to ownership and commercialization. However, the main elements of access are the same across biobanks; access will be granted to bona fide researchers conducting research in the public interest, and all biobanks will consider the scientific merit of the proposed use and it's compatibility with the biobank's objectives. These findings suggest potential areas for harmonization across biobanks. This could be achieved through a single centralized application to a number of biobanks or a system of mutual recognition that places a presumption in favor of access to one biobank if already approved by another member of the same consortium. Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure-European Research Infrastructure Consortia (BBMRI-ERIC), a European consortium of biobanks and bioresources with its own ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) common service, could provide a platform by developing guidelines for harmonized internal processes.
PubMed ID
27183185 View in PubMed
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Activities and ways of organizing better occupational health and safety in small workplaces: special focus on information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169809
Source
Ind Health. 2006 Jan;44(1):13-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Suvi Lehtinen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Ind Health. 2006 Jan;44(1):13-6
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Information Dissemination
Occupational Health
Workplace
Abstract
Information is needed in all activities aiming at the development and improvement of working conditions. The information and communication technology has made it possible to have information available 24 h a day, 360 d a year. The administrative structures in various countries also call for more information steering at the workplace level. This means that more web-based and other materials for small enterprises are needed in all countries in order to improve safety and health of the workers. Four different approaches to improve workplace level activities are described here to provide models for others to modify them to their local conditions. The networking of small workplaces supports the development of their safety and thereby also their productivity and possibilities to offer jobs also in the future.
PubMed ID
16610526 View in PubMed
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Age and gender differences in emotional and informational social support insufficiency for older adults in Atlantic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104774
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2013 Dec;45(4):50-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Gloria McInnis-Perry
Lori E Weeks
Henrik Stryhn
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2013 Dec;45(4):50-68
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Community Networks
Data Collection
Female
Geriatric Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Information Dissemination
Male
Sex Distribution
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - nursing
Abstract
It is well documented that nursing is concerned about the social support needs of older adults and the effects of those needs on health and well-being. Using survey data from the Atlantic Seniors Housing Research Alliance, the authors explore the emotional and informational social support needs of community-dwelling Canadians aged 65 and older living in the Atlantic provinces. The results indicate that these needs are not being met fully and that they increase with age. Also, men and women report different insufficiencies for specific needs; more men than women report having no support across all items. Nurses should be sensitive to specific age and gender support needs of older adults. They should also increase their social assessments and promote healthy social networks, especially for those 80 years and older. Further nursing research is recommended.
PubMed ID
24617279 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' knowledge with internet-based education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125471
Source
Methods Inf Med. 2012;51(4):295-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Katja Heikkinen
H. Leino-Kilpi
S. Salanterä
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Vanhalinna, Finland. katja.heikkinen@utu.fi
Source
Methods Inf Med. 2012;51(4):295-300
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Care - methods
Chi-Square Distribution
Educational Measurement - methods
Educational Status
Empirical Research
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Educational
Orthopedics - methods
Patient Education as Topic
Statistics as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
There is a growing need for patient education and an evaluation of its outcomes.
The aim of this study was to compare ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' knowledge with Internet-based education and face-to-face education with a nurse. The following hypothesis was proposed: Internet-based patient education (experiment) is as effective as face-to-face education with a nurse (control) in increasing patients' level of knowledge and sufficiency of knowledge. In addition, the correlations of demographic variables were tested.
The patients were randomized to either an experiment group (n = 72) or a control group (n = 75). Empirical data were collected with two instruments.
Patients in both groups showed improvement in their knowledge during their care. Patients in the experiment group improved their knowledge level significantly more in total than those patients in the control group. There were no differences in patients' sufficiency of knowledge between the groups. Knowledge was correlated especially with patients' age, gender and earlier ambulatory surgeries.
As a conclusion, positive results concerning patients' knowledge could be achieved with the Internet-based education. The Internet is a viable method in ambulatory care.
PubMed ID
22476362 View in PubMed
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AMWA's role in women's health curriculum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154330
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2008 Dec;17(10):1555
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Janice Werbinski
Author Affiliation
American College of Women's Health Physicians, Inc., Portage, Michigan 49002, USA. drwerb@aol.com
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2008 Dec;17(10):1555
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Curriculum
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Internet - organization & administration
United States
Women's health
Women's Health Services - organization & administration
PubMed ID
19000031 View in PubMed
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An analysis of research guidelines on the collection and use of human biological materials from American Indian and Alaskan Native communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49171
Source
Jurimetrics. 2002;42(2):165-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Richard R Sharp
Morris W Foster
Author Affiliation
Program in Environmental Health Policy and Ethics, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, USA.
Source
Jurimetrics. 2002;42(2):165-86
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Specimen Banks - ethics - utilization
Cultural Characteristics
Genetic Research - ethics
Guidelines
Human Experimentation - ethics - standards
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Information Dissemination
Informed Consent - standards
Inuits - genetics
Research - standards
Research Design
Research Subjects
Researcher-Subject Relations
Abstract
American Indian and Alaskan Native communities have expressed concern about the use of human biological materials in research. These concerns have prompted research sponsors and professional organizations to develop guidelines for investigators working with these communities. This paper reviews research guidelines and presents recommendations that reflect "best practices" for working with North American indigenous communities in the collection, storage, and distribution of human biological materials for research. These recommendations strike a reasonable balance between three imperatives in research: (1) minimizing harm, (2) treating sample contributors with respect, and (3) promoting intellectual freedom to pursue a range of research questions. The recommendations can be used in designing appropriate methods of collecting and using human biological materials from members of American Indian and Alaskan Native communities and will likely be applicable to other historically disadvantaged communities as well.
PubMed ID
15119331 View in PubMed
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An analysis of the clinical development of drugs in Norway for the year 2000: the completion of research and publication of results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153525
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2009 Mar;65(3):315-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Ola P Hole
Sigurd Nitter-Hauge
Henrik R Cederkvist
Finn O Winther
Author Affiliation
Faculty Division Rikshospitalet, University of Oslo, 0027 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2009 Mar;65(3):315-8
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - economics - statistics & numerical data
Biomedical Research - economics - ethics - statistics & numerical data
Clinical Trials as Topic - economics - ethics - statistics & numerical data
Drug Industry - economics - ethics - statistics & numerical data
Ethics Committees, Research - ethics - standards
Hospitals, Private - economics - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Public - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Information Dissemination - ethics
Norway
Publishing - ethics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Research Design - standards - statistics & numerical data
Research Support as Topic - ethics - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
In Norway, very little data are available on the relation between the total number of research projects on the clinical development of drugs that have been started, the number of these projects in which the research phase has been completed and the number of projects for which results have been published. The aim of this study was to determine the number of projects in which the research phase had been completed and the results published.
Information on research projects carried out on the clinical development of drugs during the year 2000 was obtained from the archives of the Norwegian Research Ethical Committee (REC) and subsequently analysed.
The final analysis revealed that 245 research projects on the clinical development of drugs had been started in 2000. Of these, 178 (73%) completed the research phase as planned. The results of 131 (54%) of these projects were published in a scientific journal, and another 34 (14%) were reported as a congress abstract or as report to a sponsor; 80 (33%) were not published at all. Industrial sponsors seemed to promote both the completion of the research process and the publication of results in scientific journals.
PubMed ID
19104790 View in PubMed
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441 records – page 1 of 45.