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440 records – page 1 of 44.

Source
CMAJ. 2009 Dec 8;181(12):928
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-8-2009
Author
George Klima
Source
CMAJ. 2009 Dec 8;181(12):928
Date
Dec-8-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Information Dissemination
Internet
Public Health
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2009 May 12;180(10):108019433834
Comment On: CMAJ. 2009 May 12;180(10):108019433834
PubMed ID
19969579 View in PubMed
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Rehabilitation in bariatrics: opportunities for practice and research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145412
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2010;32(11):952-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Mary Forhan
Yagesh Bhambhani
David Dyer
Ximena Ramos-Salas
Martin Ferguson-Pell
Arya Sharma
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. forhanm@mcmaster.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2010;32(11):952-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Information Dissemination
Obesity - rehabilitation
Research
Thinking
Abstract
Obesity is associated with a wide range of chronic illnesses and disabilities familiar to rehabilitation researchers and practitioners. Obesity discourse in the area of rehabilitation science and practice is limited.
A meeting of rehabilitation researchers, practitioners, industry and decision makers was held for the purpose of identifying research and practice priorities in the area of bariatric rehabilitation.
Areas of common ground in terms of the identification of gaps in research, practice and knowledge about obesity in the context of rehabilitation science were identified. Participants developed a concept for a bariatric rehabilitation treatment and research institute. A commitment to embark on priority action items was made.
This article describes a process that successfully gathered a diverse group of researchers, clinicians, industries and decision makers for the purpose of collectively advancing the area of bariatric rehabilitation in Canada.
PubMed ID
20156049 View in PubMed
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Information and communication in society.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172787
Source
Acta Paediatr Suppl. 2005 Jun;94(448):38-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Helena Sandberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Media and Communication Studies, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. helena.sandberg@soc.lu.se
Source
Acta Paediatr Suppl. 2005 Jun;94(448):38-9
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Information Dissemination
Journalism, Medical
Obesity
Public Opinion
Sweden
Abstract
In late modernity, the media is one of the most important social institutions in influencing people's knowledge, perceptions and actions. The media supply citizens with health-related messages and contribute thereby to their health development. The abundant flow of health-related messages, however, makes it difficult for the individual to separate good and reliable information from information of poor quality. The prevalence of overweight and obesity is rising each year in Sweden as well as in other countries. The future scenario is troublesome. The presented study deals with two questions: (1) How is overweight represented in the media? (2) What consequences do these representations have on public perceptions of overweight? A multidisciplinary approach has been chosen for the study. Theories and concepts are derived from four areas of research: consumption, bodily issues, risks and media & journalism. The aim was to describe, analyse and problematize how overweight is presented quantitatively and qualitatively in the media. The method used is content analysis. The study is limited to media content in Swedish daily newspapers, 1997-2001. In all, 1925 articles from four different papers have been analysed.
The ideals of journalism are easy to accept but too often difficult to realize. Reporters as well as physicians and scientists must make more of an effort to communicate comprehensible and useful information about overweight and obesity to their audiences. Still we know little about the amount, the quality and the utility of health information in the media. There is a need for further research in this field if we want to understand what chances people have in making informed health-related decisions and how they make sense of and use the health information at their disposal.
PubMed ID
16175805 View in PubMed
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Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Arctic Portal
Language
English
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Research
Data Sources
Iceland
Arctic Regions
Information Dissemination
Internet
Abstract
The Arctic Portal is an endorsed IPY project lead by Iceland's Senior Arctic Official in consultation and cooperation with other members of the Arctic Council and its Working Groups, Permanent Participants, Northern Forum, UArctic, the Arctic Centre at the University of Lapland, the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute of Roshydromet, the International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry, and others.
Online Resources
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Sources of child maltreatment information in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116196
Source
Minerva Pediatr. 2013 Feb;65(1):37-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
D A Potter
W E Hovdestad
L. Tonmyr
Author Affiliation
Health Surveillance and Epidemiology Division, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada. wendy.hovdestad@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Minerva Pediatr. 2013 Feb;65(1):37-49
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Abuse
Child Welfare
Humans
Information Dissemination
Abstract
Interest in understanding the problem of child maltreatment is widely shared by governments, organizations of physicians, and others. Our objective was to describe and discuss sources of information in Canada that could be used to help understand the nature and scope of the problem, either within any province or territory, or across all of Canada.
A series of web searches and a focused literature review were conducted to identify sources of child maltreatment information. Government departments responsible for child welfare were also contacted on an as-needed basis in order to identify additional sources.
Identified sources included: child welfare administrative provincial/territorial data and reports based on those data, other child welfare information, surveys of child protection workers and shelter workers, mortality/morbidity data, police data, direct surveys of children and their parents, and the 2011 Canadian census. Each type of source had strengths and limitations in terms of how it could describe the nature and scope of the problem of child maltreatment.
Increased use of morbidity and mortality data, data linking, expanding existing databases, and increasing the use of general population surveys could expand understanding of child maltreatment in Canada.
PubMed ID
23422572 View in PubMed
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Activities and ways of organizing better occupational health and safety in small workplaces: special focus on information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169809
Source
Ind Health. 2006 Jan;44(1):13-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Suvi Lehtinen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Ind Health. 2006 Jan;44(1):13-6
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Information Dissemination
Occupational Health
Workplace
Abstract
Information is needed in all activities aiming at the development and improvement of working conditions. The information and communication technology has made it possible to have information available 24 h a day, 360 d a year. The administrative structures in various countries also call for more information steering at the workplace level. This means that more web-based and other materials for small enterprises are needed in all countries in order to improve safety and health of the workers. Four different approaches to improve workplace level activities are described here to provide models for others to modify them to their local conditions. The networking of small workplaces supports the development of their safety and thereby also their productivity and possibilities to offer jobs also in the future.
PubMed ID
16610526 View in PubMed
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Community strategies to improve flood risk communication in the Red River Basin, Manitoba, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139252
Source
Disasters. 2011 Jul;35(3):554-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Robert M Stewart
Harun Rashid
Author Affiliation
Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1, Canada.
Source
Disasters. 2011 Jul;35(3):554-76
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communication
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Floods
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Abstract
More than a decade after the 1997 Red River Flood, vulnerability to future flooding exists due to a lack of risk communication. This study identifies risk communication gaps and discusses the creation of strategies to enhance information-sharing, bottom-up activity and partnership development. The objectives were achieved using mixed methods, including interviews, a floodplain-wide survey, and a decision-makers' risk management workshop. The results highlight a number of external pressures exerted by regional floodplain policies and procedures that restrict risk communication and affect social vulnerability in the rural floodplain. The failures of a top-down approach to floodplain management have impacted on communities' abilities to address floodplain risks, have amplified local risks, and have decreased community cooperation in floodplain management initiatives since the 1997 'Flood of the Century'. Recommended policies promote the establishment of community standards to compensate for gaps in risk communication and the development of partnerships between floodplain communities.
PubMed ID
21083849 View in PubMed
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Prerequisites for International Exchanges of Health Information for Record Research: Comparison of Australian, Austrian, Finnish, Swiss, and US Policies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292199
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2017; 245:1312
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Hanna Suominen
Henning Müller
Lucila Ohno-Machado
Sanna Salanterä
Günter Schreier
Leif Hanlen
Author Affiliation
The Australian National University, Data61, & University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2017; 245:1312
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Australia
Austria
Confidentiality
Finland
Health Information Systems
Humans
Information Dissemination
Privacy
Switzerland
Abstract
The policies that address health information exchanges for research purposes in Australia, Austria, Finland, Switzerland, and the USA apply accountability and/or adequacy to protect privacy. Specific requirements complicate the exchanges: inform data subjects of data use purposes; assure that the subjects are no longer identifiable; destroy the data in the end; and not to use cloud computing without specific permission.
PubMed ID
29295395 View in PubMed
Less detail

Expectations and beliefs in science communication: Learning from three European gene therapy discussions of the early 1990s.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279259
Source
Public Underst Sci. 2016 Apr;25(3):317-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Gitte Meyer
Source
Public Underst Sci. 2016 Apr;25(3):317-31
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Genetic Therapy - psychology
Germany
Information Dissemination
Public Opinion
Science
United Kingdom
Abstract
There is widespread agreement that the potential of gene therapy was oversold in the early 1990s. This study, however, comparing written material from the British, Danish and German gene therapy discourses of the period finds significant differences: Over-optimism was not equally strong everywhere; gene therapy was not universally hyped. Against that background, attention is directed towards another area of variation in the material: different basic assumptions about science and scientists. Exploring such culturally rooted assumptions and beliefs and their possible significance to science communication practices, it is argued that deep beliefs may constitute drivers of hype that are particularly difficult to deal with. To participants in science communication, the discouragement of hype, viewed as a practical-ethical challenge, can be seen as a learning exercise that includes critical attention to internalised beliefs.
PubMed ID
25313143 View in PubMed
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Fundamentals of knowledge translation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116959
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Jan;35(1):73-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
K S Joseph
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of British Columbia, Children and Women's Hospital of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC Perinatal Services BC, Provincial Health Services Authority, Vancouver BC.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Jan;35(1):73-7
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes
Canada
Health education
Humans
Information Dissemination
Translational Medical Research
PubMed ID
23343801 View in PubMed
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440 records – page 1 of 44.