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334 records – page 1 of 34.

1993-1994 influenza season: Canadian laboratory diagnoses, strain characterization and post-season serosurvey (Ontario).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217086
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1994 Oct 30;20(20):177-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1994
Author
J M Weber
Author Affiliation
National Laboratory for Special Pathogens, Bureau of Microbiology, LCDC, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1994 Oct 30;20(20):177-81
Date
Oct-30-1994
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Humans
Influenza A virus - classification
Influenza B virus - classification
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Laboratories
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Vaccination
Abstract
In Canada as a whole, influenza A/Beijing/32/92-like virus was the dominant infecting strain in the 1993-1994 season with reported laboratory diagnoses peaking in January 1994. Vaccination is again urged for all persons in high-risk groups. Antibody induced by vaccination does not persist well from season to season and the emerging A/Shangdong/9/93 (H3N2)-like variant is related to A/Beijing/32/92(H3N2) but is inhibited less by antibodies to that strain. Conditions are also consistent with possible increased influenza B activity this season.
PubMed ID
7812234 View in PubMed
Less detail

1994-1995 influenza season: Canadian laboratory diagnoses and strain characterization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214055
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1995 Oct 30;21(20):181-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1995
Author
J M Weber
Author Affiliation
National Laboratory for Special Pathogens, Bureau of Microbiology, LCDC, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1995 Oct 30;21(20):181-5
Date
Oct-30-1995
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Influenza A virus - isolation & purification
Influenza B virus - isolation & purification
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Influenza, Human - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Seasons
PubMed ID
8563690 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic: the role of threat, coping, and media trust on vaccination intentions in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117388
Source
J Health Commun. 2013;18(3):278-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sheena Aislinn Taha
Kimberly Matheson
Hymie Anisman
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. sheena_taha@carleton.ca
Source
J Health Commun. 2013;18(3):278-90
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Intention
Male
Mass Media
Pandemics - prevention & control
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Trust
Vaccination - psychology
Abstract
Swine flu (H1N1) reached pandemic proportions in 2009, yet ambivalence was met concerning intentions to be vaccinated. The present investigation determined predictors of perceived H1N1 contraction risk and vaccination intentions among Canadian adults (N = 1,027) responding to an online questionnaire. The relatively low rate of vaccination intent (30.12%, and 34.99% being unsure of their intent) was related to a sense of invulnerability regarding illness contraction and symptom severity. Most individuals were skeptical that H1N1 would be widespread, believing that less than 10% of the population would contract H1N1. Yet, they also indicated that their attitudes would change once a single person they knew contracted the illness. Also, worry regarding H1N1 was related to self-contraction risk and odds of individuals seeking vaccination. Moreover, vaccination intent was related to the perception that the threat was not particularly great, mistrust of the media to provide accurate information regarding H1N1, and whether individuals endorsed problem-focused versus avoidant coping strategies. Given the role media plays in public perceptions related to a health crisis, trust in this outlet and credibility regarding the threat are necessary for adherence to recommended measures to minimize health risk.
PubMed ID
23301849 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2009 Provincial decision to de-emphasize seasonal influenza vaccine in Canada: real-time risk-benefit analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136573
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Mar 15;52(6):829-30; author reply 830-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2011
Author
Perry R W Kendall
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Mar 15;52(6):829-30; author reply 830-1
Date
Mar-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Pandemics
Risk assessment
Vaccination - utilization
Notes
Comment On: Clin Infect Dis. 2010 Dec 15;51(12):1380-221067354
PubMed ID
21367739 View in PubMed
Less detail

[About the estimation of non specific protective effect of vaccination against infections actual for military personnel].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118396
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2012 Oct;333(10):40-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
G G Mar'in
O A Gruzdeva
V V Valevskii
N N Tsapkova
V V Alekseev
A A Sobolev
M A Sokolov
D V Sibilev
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2012 Oct;333(10):40-6
Date
Oct-2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Humans
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Influenza, Human - mortality - prevention & control
Male
Mass Vaccination - methods
Military Medicine
Military Personnel
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Flue and other respiratory diseases morbidity of servicemen of training students are researched. Epidemiological and economic effectiveness of flue vaccine "Bakcuspun" (Vaksigrip) is estimated. Its non-specific protective effect in case of acute respiratory diseases and pyodermia is shown.
PubMed ID
23213772 View in PubMed
Less detail

Additive preventive effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in elderly persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57405
Source
Eur Respir J. 2004 Mar;23(3):363-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
B. Christenson
J. Hedlund
P. Lundbergh
A. Ortqvist
Author Affiliation
Dept of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Stockholm County, Sweden.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2004 Mar;23(3):363-8
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Hospital Mortality
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage
Pneumonia, Pneumococcal - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Vaccination
Abstract
In 1999, all individuals > or = 65 yrs of age (n=258,754) in Stockholm County, Sweden, were offered influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in a prospective study on the effectiveness of these vaccines in reducing the need for hospital treatment and death due to influenza, pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Data on hospitalisation and mortality during 1 yr were obtained from the administrative database in Stockholm County Council. Vaccination was performed in 124,702 (48%) subjects; 72,107 had both vaccines, 29,346 only had the influenza vaccine and 23,249 only had the pneumococcal vaccine. Compared with the unvaccinated cohort, a lower incidence of hospitalisation for all endpoint diagnoses was seen in vaccinated persons. An additive effectiveness of vaccination was seen when both vaccines were given, with a reduction of hospital admissions for influenza (37%), pneumonia (29%) and IPD (44%). In-hospital mortality for pneumonia was significantly lower in those who received both vaccines, than in unvaccinated persons. To conclude, vaccination with influenza and pneumococcal vaccines together was effective in reducing the need for hospital admission for influenza and pneumonia. There was a strong indication that pneumococcal vaccination alone, was effective not only in the prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease, but also of pneumonia overall, although to a low degree.
PubMed ID
15065822 View in PubMed
Less detail

Administration of the adjuvanted pH1N1 vaccine in egg-allergic children at high risk for influenza A/H1N1 disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133348
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 May-Jun;102(3):196-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jane E Schuler
W James King
Natalie L Dayneka
Lynn Rastelli
Evelyn Marquis
Zave Chad
Charles Hui
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON. jschuler@cheo.on.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 May-Jun;102(3):196-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Egg Hypersensitivity
Female
Humans
Immunization Schedule
Infant
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
Male
Prospective Studies
Safety Management
Abstract
In Canada, the pH1N1 influenza vaccine is recommended for children, particularly those less than 5 years of age or with chronic underlying disease. The pH1N1 vaccine, which contains residual allergenic egg white proteins, may pose a risk for vaccination of egg-allergic children.
To describe the outcome of pH1N1 influenza vaccine administration to egg-allergic children at risk for severe H1N1 disease.
Prospective observational cohort study. Children identified as at high risk for egg allergy and H1N1 influenza were vaccinated using a two-dose split protocol in a controlled medical setting. Children were given an initial test dose; if no reaction was noted, the remainder of the dose was administered and the children were followed for allergic reactions. Those who tolerated the split dose and required a second dose of vaccine were offered vaccination four weeks later as one injection.
Sixty-two egg-allergic children considered at high risk for H1N1 disease received the adjuvanted pH1N1 vaccine. Egg allergy was diagnosed both clinically by an allergist and using skin and/or serum IgE testing. Within one hour of immunization, 2 children developed hives, 1 had a vasovagal response and 1 had a hypo-responsive episode. Fourteen children received the second H1N1 dose and 1 developed erythema and itching. There were no anaphylactic reactions.
Administration of the adjuvanted pH1N1 vaccine in egg-allergic children at risk for severe H1N1 influenza was safe when performed in a two-dose split protocol in a controlled medical setting.
PubMed ID
21714318 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Advantages and disadvantages of inactivated and live influenza vaccine].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178960
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2004 Jul-Aug;49(4):4-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu Z Gendon
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2004 Jul-Aug;49(4):4-12
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Allergens - immunology
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Child
Clinical Trials as Topic
Egg Proteins - immunology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - etiology
Immunity, Mucosal
Immunization Schedule
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Russia - epidemiology
Vaccination - adverse effects
Vaccines, Attenuated - administration & dosage
Vaccines, Inactivated - administration & dosage
Abstract
Published data related with comparison studies of safety, efficiency and some other properties of cold-adapted live influenza vaccine (LIV) and of inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) are analyzed. LIV and IIV do not differ by systemic reactions after administration; however, it is not ruled out that there can be unfavorable reactions in vaccination of persons with allergy to the chicken-embryo proteins as well as in cases of persistence/reversion of cold-adapted strain observed in vaccination of persons with primary impairments of the immune system. There are no convincing data, up to now, on that LIV is superior to IIV in coping with influenza pandemics. The efficiency of LIV and IIV for children aged 3 years and more and for healthy adults is virtually identical. Additional controllable field comparative studies of LIV and IIV efficiency in immunization of elderly persons are needed. Limited data on LIV efficiency for children aged 2 months and more were obtained. The need in a 2-stage vaccination of all age group with the aim of ensuring responses to all 3 LIV components is, certainly, a LIV disadvantage. In case of IIV, the 2-stage vaccination is needed only for persons who were not ill with influenza. The intranasal LIV administration has, from the practical and psychological standpoints, an advantage before the IIV administration by syringe. The ability of LIV to protect from the drift influenza-virus variations could be its advantage before IIV; still, more research is needed to verify it. Transplantable cell lines meeting the WHO requirements could be an optimal substrate for the production of LIV and IIV. Children are the optimal age group for influenza prevention by cold-adapted LIV, whereas, IIV fits better for vaccination of adults and elderly persons.
PubMed ID
15293504 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A/Fujian--a changeable influenza virus which may cause problems during winter]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30570
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Dec 11;100(50):4184-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-11-2003

334 records – page 1 of 34.