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235 records – page 1 of 24.

Aboriginal groups seek representation on Pan-Canadian Public Health Network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147858
Source
CMAJ. 2009 Nov 24;181(11):781-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-24-2009

[A comparative study of live and inactivated influenza vaccines: the organization of the observation and the results of a study of their reactogenicity and immunogenicity].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218231
Source
Vopr Virusol. 1994 May-Jun;39(3):129-31
Publication Type
Article
Author
A N Slepushkin
L G Rudenko
A P Kendal
A S Monto
A L Beliaev
E I Burtseva
E P Grigor'eva
N P Obrosova-Serova
V T Ivanova
V E Bragina
Source
Vopr Virusol. 1994 May-Jun;39(3):129-31
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Antibody Specificity
Child
Drug Evaluation
Humans
Influenza A virus - immunology
Influenza B virus - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - adverse effects - immunology
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
Russia
Urban Population
Vaccines, Attenuated - adverse effects - immunology
Vaccines, Combined - adverse effects - immunology
Vaccines, Inactivated - adverse effects - immunology
Abstract
Schoolchildren of 30 to 34 schools of Novgorod were vaccinated over a three-year period with Russian live cold-adapted attenuated vaccine for children and whole-virus inactivated vaccines and placebo for comparative field study of the vaccines properties and efficacy. In control trials both bi- and trivalent live attenuated vaccines were well tolerated and areactogenic. A whole-virus inactivated trivalent vaccine induced mild and moderate fever and local reactions in 2-4% of the vaccinees. Special observations are necessary to establish the possibility of use and to determine a dose of this inactivated vaccine for immunization of children, especially those of 7-10 years of age. All the vaccines induced HI antibody production in 50-80% and antineuraminidase in 50-70% of seronegative children. The pattern of the results was similar to that in revaccinated children with preexisting antibody at a level of 1:20, but much lower in children with the initial titre above 1:20. After the 3rd year of vaccination the immune response of the vaccinees was similar, most of the results depending on the initial antibody titre and also on the change of vaccine strains. This raises a question of the expediency of annual influenza revaccination of the same person after 2 years of successful immunization and of the necessity of vaccine strains replacement after 2-3 years of use.
PubMed ID
8091754 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A comparative study of the inoculation properties of live recombinant and inactivated influenza vaccines made from strain A/Philippines/2/82 (H3N2) in 8- to 15-year-old children].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225785
Source
Vopr Virusol. 1991 Sep-Oct;36(5):372-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
A N Slepushkin
N P Obrosova-Serova
E I Burtseva
E A Govorkova
L G Rudenko
R V Vartanian
A I Vereshchinskii
M D Musina
N I Lonskaia
L A Zazimko
Source
Vopr Virusol. 1991 Sep-Oct;36(5):372-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Child
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Humans
Influenza Vaccines - adverse effects - immunology
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
International Cooperation
Moscow
Orthomyxoviridae - immunology
United States
Vaccines, Inactivated - adverse effects - immunology
Vaccines, Synthetic - adverse effects - immunology
Abstract
This study was carried out to compare reactogenicity, immunogenicity, and efficacy of live attenuated and inactivated influenza vaccines prepared from influenza A/Philippines/2/82-like virus strains. Schoolchildren of a boarding school of Moscow were randomly divided into three groups: (1) vaccinated with a live attenuated vaccine, (2) vaccinated with inactivated influenza vaccine, and (3) given placebo. Both vaccines were well tolerated by the children, with practically no severe general or local reactions. The inactivated vaccine was found to be superior to the live one in its capacity to stimulate humoral immunity studied by HI, EIA, and microneutralization tests. In 69.7% of the children given the inactivated vaccine, seroconversion to the vaccine strain was detected by two or three methods of antibody titration used. Only 35.4% seroconversions were demonstrated in children immunized with the live influenza vaccine. Enzyme immunoassay was found to be a more sensitive but less specific method for antibody titration as compared with HI test whereas microneutralization proved to be more specific but less sensitive for titration of antibodies to influenza A (H3N2) viruses.
PubMed ID
1803766 View in PubMed
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Administration of the adjuvanted pH1N1 vaccine in egg-allergic children at high risk for influenza A/H1N1 disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133348
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 May-Jun;102(3):196-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jane E Schuler
W James King
Natalie L Dayneka
Lynn Rastelli
Evelyn Marquis
Zave Chad
Charles Hui
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON. jschuler@cheo.on.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 May-Jun;102(3):196-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Egg Hypersensitivity
Female
Humans
Immunization Schedule
Infant
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
Male
Prospective Studies
Safety Management
Abstract
In Canada, the pH1N1 influenza vaccine is recommended for children, particularly those less than 5 years of age or with chronic underlying disease. The pH1N1 vaccine, which contains residual allergenic egg white proteins, may pose a risk for vaccination of egg-allergic children.
To describe the outcome of pH1N1 influenza vaccine administration to egg-allergic children at risk for severe H1N1 disease.
Prospective observational cohort study. Children identified as at high risk for egg allergy and H1N1 influenza were vaccinated using a two-dose split protocol in a controlled medical setting. Children were given an initial test dose; if no reaction was noted, the remainder of the dose was administered and the children were followed for allergic reactions. Those who tolerated the split dose and required a second dose of vaccine were offered vaccination four weeks later as one injection.
Sixty-two egg-allergic children considered at high risk for H1N1 disease received the adjuvanted pH1N1 vaccine. Egg allergy was diagnosed both clinically by an allergist and using skin and/or serum IgE testing. Within one hour of immunization, 2 children developed hives, 1 had a vasovagal response and 1 had a hypo-responsive episode. Fourteen children received the second H1N1 dose and 1 developed erythema and itching. There were no anaphylactic reactions.
Administration of the adjuvanted pH1N1 vaccine in egg-allergic children at risk for severe H1N1 influenza was safe when performed in a two-dose split protocol in a controlled medical setting.
PubMed ID
21714318 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of behavioral health compliance and microbial risk factors on student populations within a high-density campus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118921
Source
J Am Coll Health. 2012;60(8):584-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jody F Decker
Robin M Slawson
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. jdecker@wlu.ca
Source
J Am Coll Health. 2012;60(8):584-95
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Female
Hand Hygiene - standards - statistics & numerical data
Health Behavior
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Influenza, Human - prevention & control - transmission - virology
Male
Microbiological Techniques - methods - statistics & numerical data
Population Density
Residence Characteristics - classification - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Student Health Services - utilization
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Universities - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this Canadian study was to assess student behavioral response to disease transmission risk, while identifying high microbial deposition/transmission sites.
A student survey was conducted during October 2009.
The methods included a survey of students to assess use of health services, vaccination compliance, and hygiene along with a microbial analysis of potential transmission sites targeting specific residence buildings on campus.
Results indicated that most students maintained that they were worried about H1N1 and reported making changes in hygienic behavior, with the majority not planning to be vaccinated. The microbial analysis indicated contamination of fomites in co-ed residences to be higher than either male or female student residences.
A consideration of physical space along with behavioral factors is required in order to properly assess risk pathways in the establishment of an evidence-based infection control plan for universities and their contiguous communities.
PubMed ID
23157200 View in PubMed
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[Anti-influenza vaccination in a family medicine department].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213200
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Jan-Feb;87(1):25-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Maziade
P M Bernard
Author Affiliation
Département de médecine familiale, Université Laval, Québec.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Jan-Feb;87(1):25-7
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Immunization Programs - trends
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
Male
Quebec
Abstract
This study describes the anti-influenza vaccination coverage of persons aged 65 or over who presented at the family medicine unit (FMU) of the Saint-Sacrement Hospital (Quebec City), between January 1988 and December 1992. All individuals were classified according to their anti-influenza vaccination status for each vaccination period. In general, the proportion of vaccinated persons increased by 14.1% during the five-year vaccination period. The mean increase in the proportion of vaccinated persons is 22.6% for those seen at least once a year at the FMU and 52.6% for those who were vaccinated at the FMU the previous year. The study results indicate that regular medical examination and previous vaccination increase the likelihood of subsequent vaccination in persons aged 65 or over.
PubMed ID
8991738 View in PubMed
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Assessing and responding in real time to online anti-vaccine sentiment during a flu pandemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139974
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13 Spec No:8-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Neil Seeman
Alton Ing
Carlos Rizo
Author Affiliation
Health Strategy Innovation Cell, Massey College, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario. neil.seeman@utoronto.ca
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13 Spec No:8-15
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - adverse effects - immunology
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Young Adult
Abstract
The perceived safety of vaccination is an important explanatory factor for vaccine uptake and, consequently, for rates of illness and death. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate Canadian attitudes around the safety of the H1N1 vaccine during the fall 2009 influenza pandemic and (2) to consider how public health communications can leverage the Internet to counteract, in real time, anti-vaccine sentiment. We surveyed a random sample of 175,257 Canadian web users from October 27 to November 19, 2009, about their perceptions of the safety of the HINI vaccine. In an independent analysis, we also assessed the popularity of online flu vaccine-related information using a tool developed for this purpose. A total of 27,382 unique online participants answered the survey (15.6% response rate). Of the respondents, 23.4% considered the vaccine safe, 41.4% thought it was unsafe and 35.2% reported ambivalence over its safety. Websites and blog posts with anti-vaccine sentiment remained popular during the course of the pandemic. Current public health communication and education strategies about the flu vaccine can be complemented by web analytics that identify, track and neutralize anti-vaccine sentiment on the Internet, thus increasing perceived vaccine safety. Counter-marketing strategies can be transparent and collaborative, engaging online "influencers" who spread misinformation.
PubMed ID
20959725 View in PubMed
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Assessing the effectiveness and feasibility of implementing mitigation measures for an influenza pandemic in remote and isolated First Nations communities: a qualitative community-based participatory research approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260147
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2013 Oct-Dec;13(4):2566
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nadia A Charania
Leonard Js Tsuji
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2013 Oct-Dec;13(4):2566
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Communicable Disease Control - economics - methods
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods
Evidence-Based Medicine
Feasibility Studies
Health Facility Closure
Humans
Indians, North American
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
Ontario
Pandemics - prevention & control
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Quarantine - methods
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Abstract
The next influenza pandemic is predicted to disproportionately impact marginalized populations, such as those living in geographically remote Aboriginal communities, and there remains a paucity of scientific literature regarding effective and feasible community mitigation strategies. In Canada, current pandemic plans may not have been developed with adequate First Nations consultation and recommended measures may not be effective in remote and isolated First Nations communities.
This study employed a community-based participatory research approach. Retrospective opinions were elicited via interview questionnaires with adult key healthcare informants (n=9) regarding the effectiveness and feasibility of implementing 41 interventions to mitigate an influenza pandemic in remote and isolated First Nations communities of sub-Arctic Ontario, Canada. Qualitative data were manually transcribed and deductively coded following a template organizing approach.
The results indicated that most mitigation measures could potentially be effective if modified to address the unique characteristics of these communities. Participants also offered innovative alternatives to mitigation measures that were community-specific and culturally sensitive. Mitigation measures were generally considered to be effective if the measure could aid in decreasing virus transmission, protecting their immunocompromised population, and increasing community awareness about influenza pandemics. Participants reported that lack of resources (eg supplies, monies, trained personnel), poor community awareness, overcrowding in homes, and inadequate healthcare infrastructure presented barriers to the implementation of mitigation measures.
This study highlights the importance of engaging local key informants in pandemic planning in order to gain valuable community-specific insight regarding the design and implementation of more effective and feasible mitigation strategies. As it is ethically important to address the needs of marginalized populations, it is recommended that these findings be incorporated in future pandemic plans to improve the response capacity and health outcomes of remote and isolated First Nations communities during the next public health emergency.
PubMed ID
24261860 View in PubMed
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235 records – page 1 of 24.