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1995-1996 influenza season: Canadian laboratory diagnoses and strain characterization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210561
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1996 Nov 15;22(22):185-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1996
Author
S. Zou
J. Weber
Author Affiliation
National Laboratory for Special Pathogens, Bureau of Microbiology, LCDC, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1996 Nov 15;22(22):185-8
Date
Nov-15-1996
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Humans
Influenza A virus - classification - isolation & purification
Influenza B virus - classification - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Sentinel Surveillance
PubMed ID
9086630 View in PubMed
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1996-1997 influenza season: Canadian laboratory diagnoses and strain characterization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207546
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1997 Sep 15;23(18):137-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1997
Author
S. Zou
Author Affiliation
National Laboratory for Special Pathogens, Bureau of Microbiology, LCDC, Ottawa, ON.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1997 Sep 15;23(18):137-41
Date
Sep-15-1997
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Clinical Laboratory Techniques
Disease Outbreaks
Humans
Incidence
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Orthomyxoviridae - classification
Seasons
Species Specificity
PubMed ID
9376820 View in PubMed
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2009 Pandemic influenza A H1N1 in Alaska: temporal and geographic characteristics of spread and increased risk of hospitalization among Alaska Native and Asian/Pacific Islander people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136553
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2011
Author
Jay D Wenger
Louisa J Castrodale
Dana L Bruden
James W Keck
Tammy Zulz
Michael G Bruce
Donna A Fearey
Joe McLaughlin
Debby Hurlburt
Kim Boyd Hummel
Sassa Kitka
Steve Bentley
Timothy K Thomas
Rosalyn Singleton
John T Redd
Larry Layne
James E Cheek
Thomas W Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. jdw2@cdc.gov
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Date
Jan-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Child
Child, Preschool
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Geography
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Male
Middle Aged
Pandemics
Population Groups
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Alaska Native people have suffered disproportionately from previous influenza pandemics. We evaluated 3 separate syndromic data sources to determine temporal and geographic patterns of spread of 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 (pH1N1) in Alaska, and reviewed records from persons hospitalized with pH1N1 disease in 3 areas in Alaska to characterize clinical and epidemiologic features of disease in Alaskans. A wave of pH1N1 disease swept through Alaska beginning in most areas in August or early September. In rural regions, where Alaska Native people comprise a substantial proportion of the population, disease occurred earlier than in other regions. Alaska Native people and Asian/Pacific Islanders (A/PI) were 2-4 times more likely to be hospitalized than whites. Alaska Native people and other minorities remain at high risk for early and substantial morbidity from pandemic influenza episodes. These findings should be integrated into plans for distribution and use of vaccine and antiviral agents.
PubMed ID
21342894 View in PubMed
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Age-specific differences in influenza A epidemic curves: do children drive the spread of influenza epidemics?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134294
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Jul 1;174(1):109-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2011
Author
Dena Schanzer
Julie Vachon
Louise Pelletier
Author Affiliation
Modeling and Projection Section, Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Branch, Public Health Agency of Canada, 100 Eglantine Driveway, Tunney’s Pasture, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9, Canada. dena.schanzer@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Jul 1;174(1):109-17
Date
Jul-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Seasons
Time Factors
Abstract
There is accumulating evidence suggesting that children may drive the spread of influenza epidemics. The objective of this study was to quantify the lead time by age using laboratory-confirmed cases of influenza A for the 1995/1996-2005/2006 seasons from Canadian communities and laboratory-confirmed hospital admissions for the H1N1/2009 pandemic strain. With alignment of the epidemic curves locally before aggregation of cases, slight age-specific differences in the timing of infection became apparent. For seasonal influenza, both the 10-19- and 20-29-year age groups peaked 1 week earlier than other age groups, while during the fall wave of the 2009 pandemic, infections peaked earlier among only the 10-19-year age group. In the H3N2 seasons, infections occurred an average of 3.9 (95% confidence interval: 1.7, 6.1) days earlier in the 20-29-year age group than for youth aged 10-19 years, while during the fall pandemic wave, the 10-19-year age group had a statistically significant lead of 3 days compared with both younger children aged 4-9 years and adults aged 20-29 years (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
21602300 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of etiology of influenza-like morbidity and monitoring influenza epidemic of 1998-1999 by laboratory diagnosis methods].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194787
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2001;(3):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
A A Sominina
A O Monaenkov
E A Smorodintseva
O M Litvinova
L G Iukhnova
V B Rodionova
T G Lobova
E G Deeva
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2001;(3):8-12
Date
2001
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Laboratory Techniques
Disease Outbreaks
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - virology
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The etiological structure of influenza-like was analyzed in the population in cities and towns and in Russia as a whole in November 1998 to April 1999 by the findings of immunofluorescence and serological surveys of patients with acute respiratory viral infections (ARVI). By the results of both tests, the proportion of the incidence of influenza A (H3N2) was largest, the decreasing order in their significance was as follows: adenoviruses, type 3 parainfluenza virus, RSV, influenza B virus, influenza A(H1N1), types 2 and 1 parainfluenza virus. All influenza viruses A(H1N1) were isolated in Samara in February 1999. Three of them were similar to the reference strain A/Johannesburg/82/96 in antigenic properties, two strains appeared to be its drift variants. No A/Beijing/262/95 (H1N1)-like viruses recommended for incorporation as part of vaccines were detected. All influenza A(H3N2) viruses were drift variants of strain A/Sydney/05/97, and all influenza B viruses were similar to the reference strain B/Harbin/07/94 in antigenic structure.
PubMed ID
11338361 View in PubMed
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Association between patient age and influenza A subtype during influenza outbreaks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144686
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2010 May;31(5):535-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Bonita E Lee
Shamir N Mukhi
Steven J Drews
Author Affiliation
Provincial Public Health Laboratory (ProvLab), Calgary, AB, Canada, T2N 4W4.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2010 May;31(5):535-7
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Infant
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - classification - isolation & purification
Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype - classification - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Long-Term Care - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The distribution of influenza A subtypes was studied in specimens recovered from patients in long-term care facility (LTCF) outbreaks and in non-LTCF outbreaks in Alberta, Canada, for 3 years before the influenza pandemic of 2009. We found that H3 but not H1 was associated with infection in older adults. Therefore, H3 was more commonly found than H1 in outbreaks in LTCFs.
PubMed ID
20334548 View in PubMed
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Association between the 2008-09 seasonal influenza vaccine and pandemic H1N1 illness during Spring-Summer 2009: four observational studies from Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144255
Source
PLoS Med. 2010 Apr;7(4):e1000258
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Danuta M Skowronski
Gaston De Serres
Natasha S Crowcroft
Naveed Z Janjua
Nicole Boulianne
Travis S Hottes
Laura C Rosella
James A Dickinson
Rodica Gilca
Pam Sethi
Najwa Ouhoummane
Donald J Willison
Isabelle Rouleau
Martin Petric
Kevin Fonseca
Steven J Drews
Anuradha Rebbapragada
Hugues Charest
Marie-Eve Hamelin
Guy Boivin
Jennifer L Gardy
Yan Li
Trijntje L Kwindt
David M Patrick
Robert C Brunham
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC), Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. danuta.skowronski@bccdc.ca
Source
PLoS Med. 2010 Apr;7(4):e1000258
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - pathogenicity
Influenza Vaccines - adverse effects
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Observation
Abstract
In late spring 2009, concern was raised in Canada that prior vaccination with the 2008-09 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) was associated with increased risk of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) (pH1N1) illness. Several epidemiologic investigations were conducted through the summer to assess this putative association.
STUDIES INCLUDED: (1) test-negative case-control design based on Canada's sentinel vaccine effectiveness monitoring system in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, and Quebec; (2) conventional case-control design using population controls in Quebec; (3) test-negative case-control design in Ontario; and (4) prospective household transmission (cohort) study in Quebec. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios for TIV effect on community- or hospital-based laboratory-confirmed seasonal or pH1N1 influenza cases compared to controls with restriction, stratification, and adjustment for covariates including combinations of age, sex, comorbidity, timeliness of medical visit, prior physician visits, and/or health care worker (HCW) status. For the prospective study risk ratios were computed. Based on the sentinel study of 672 cases and 857 controls, 2008-09 TIV was associated with statistically significant protection against seasonal influenza (odds ratio 0.44, 95% CI 0.33-0.59). In contrast, estimates from the sentinel and three other observational studies, involving a total of 1,226 laboratory-confirmed pH1N1 cases and 1,505 controls, indicated that prior receipt of 2008-09 TIV was associated with increased risk of medically attended pH1N1 illness during the spring-summer 2009, with estimated risk or odds ratios ranging from 1.4 to 2.5. Risk of pH1N1 hospitalization was not further increased among vaccinated people when comparing hospitalized to community cases.
Prior receipt of 2008-09 TIV was associated with increased risk of medically attended pH1N1 illness during the spring-summer 2009 in Canada. The occurrence of bias (selection, information) or confounding cannot be ruled out. Further experimental and epidemiological assessment is warranted. Possible biological mechanisms and immunoepidemiologic implications are considered.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20386731 View in PubMed
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Atypical characteristics of nucleoprotein of pandemic influenza virus H1N1 and their roles in reassortment restriction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136826
Source
Arch Virol. 2011 Jun;156(6):1031-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Asawin Wanitchang
Prasatha Patarasirin
Juggragarn Jengarn
Anan Jongkaewwattana
Author Affiliation
Virology and Cell Technology Laboratory, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC), 113 Phaholyothin Rd., Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand.
Source
Arch Virol. 2011 Jun;156(6):1031-40
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blotting, Western
Cell Line
Codon, Initiator
Dogs
HEK293 Cells
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - genetics - physiology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Mutation
Pandemics
RNA Replicase - metabolism
RNA-Binding Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Reassortant Viruses - genetics - physiology
Recombination, Genetic
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Ribonucleoproteins - metabolism
Viral Core Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Viral Proteins - metabolism
Abstract
Sequence analysis of the nucleoprotein (NP) of swine-origin influenza virus H1N1 (S-OIV) reveals a number of atypical characteristics including an early start codon and a highly conserved, non-aromatic residue at position 313. Using an in vitro viral polymerase reconstitution assay, we found that the polymerase complex containing the NP of S-OIV (NP(S-OIV)) yielded substantially lower activity than those assayed with NP derived from other influenza virus strains. Moreover, alteration of the early start codon or introduction of an aromatic residue at position 313 (V313Y) did not increase but instead exacerbated the poor polymerase activity. Interestingly, when NP(S-OIV) was allowed to compete with that of a mouse-adapted influenza virus (A/PR/8/34) to form progeny virions, only progeny bearing NP(S-OIV) were produced, despite the low polymerase activity associated with NP(S-OIV). Our results indicated that NP(S-OIV) requires both the early start codon and the V313 residue for its optimal function. These characteristics are required for a strong compatibility between the S-OIV polymerase subunits and its indigenous NP over that of other strains, which might explain why productive reassortment between S-OIV and seasonal influenza viruses has yet to occur in nature.
PubMed ID
21340741 View in PubMed
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Characterization in vitro and in vivo of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza viruses isolated from patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123224
Source
J Virol. 2012 Sep;86(17):9361-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Tokiko Watanabe
Masaki Imai
Shinji Watanabe
Kyoko Shinya
Masato Hatta
Chengjun Li
Gabriele Neumann
Makoto Ozawa
Anthony Hanson
Gongxun Zhong
Satoshi Fukuyama
Eiryo Kawakami
Heather A Simmons
Daniel Schenkman
Kevin Brunner
Saverio V Capuano
Jason T Weinfurter
Anette Kilander
Susanne G Dudman
M. Suresh
Olav Hungnes
Thomas C Friedrich
Yoshihiro Kawaoka
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathobiological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA. twatanabe@svm.vetmed.wisc.edu
Source
J Virol. 2012 Sep;86(17):9361-8
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Cell Line
Female
Ferrets
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity - physiology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Macaca
Molecular Sequence Data
Norway - epidemiology
Pandemics
Viral Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Virulence
Virus Replication
Abstract
The first influenza pandemic of the 21st century was caused by novel H1N1 viruses that emerged in early 2009. Molecular evolutionary analyses of the 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 [A(H1N1)pdm09] virus revealed two major clusters, cluster I and cluster II. Although the pathogenicity of viruses belonging to cluster I, which became extinct by the end of 2009, has been examined in a nonhuman primate model, the pathogenic potential of viruses belonging to cluster II, which has spread more widely in the world, has not been studied in this animal model. Here, we characterized two Norwegian isolates belonging to cluster II, namely, A/Norway/3568/2009 (Norway3568) and A/Norway/3487-2/2009 (Norway3487), which caused distinct clinical symptoms, despite their genetic similarity. We observed more efficient replication in cultured cells and delayed virus clearance from ferret respiratory organs for Norway3487 virus, which was isolated from a severe case, compared with the efficiency of replication and time of clearance of Norway3568 virus, which was isolated from a mild case. Moreover, Norway3487 virus to some extent caused more severe lung damage in nonhuman primates than did Norway3568 virus. Our data suggest that the distinct replicative and pathogenic potentials of these two viruses may result from differences in their biological properties (e.g., the receptor-binding specificity of hemagglutinin and viral polymerase activity).
Notes
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PubMed ID
22718834 View in PubMed
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63 records – page 1 of 7.