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The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic: the role of threat, coping, and media trust on vaccination intentions in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117388
Source
J Health Commun. 2013;18(3):278-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sheena Aislinn Taha
Kimberly Matheson
Hymie Anisman
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. sheena_taha@carleton.ca
Source
J Health Commun. 2013;18(3):278-90
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Intention
Male
Mass Media
Pandemics - prevention & control
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Trust
Vaccination - psychology
Abstract
Swine flu (H1N1) reached pandemic proportions in 2009, yet ambivalence was met concerning intentions to be vaccinated. The present investigation determined predictors of perceived H1N1 contraction risk and vaccination intentions among Canadian adults (N = 1,027) responding to an online questionnaire. The relatively low rate of vaccination intent (30.12%, and 34.99% being unsure of their intent) was related to a sense of invulnerability regarding illness contraction and symptom severity. Most individuals were skeptical that H1N1 would be widespread, believing that less than 10% of the population would contract H1N1. Yet, they also indicated that their attitudes would change once a single person they knew contracted the illness. Also, worry regarding H1N1 was related to self-contraction risk and odds of individuals seeking vaccination. Moreover, vaccination intent was related to the perception that the threat was not particularly great, mistrust of the media to provide accurate information regarding H1N1, and whether individuals endorsed problem-focused versus avoidant coping strategies. Given the role media plays in public perceptions related to a health crisis, trust in this outlet and credibility regarding the threat are necessary for adherence to recommended measures to minimize health risk.
PubMed ID
23301849 View in PubMed
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The 2009 H1N1 pandemic response in remote First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario: barriers and improvements from a health care services perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130157
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nadia A Charania
Leonard J S Tsuji
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. ncharani@uwaterloo.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Catchment Area (Health)
Federal Government
Female
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Information Dissemination
Male
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pandemics - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Professional-Patient Relations
Retrospective Studies
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
To retrospectively examine the barriers faced and opportunities for improvement during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic response experienced by participants responsible for the delivery of health care services in 3 remote and isolated Subarctic First Nation communities of northern Ontario, Canada.
A qualitative community-based participatory approach.
Semi-directed interviews were conducted with adult key informants (n=13) using purposive sampling of participants representing the 3 main sectors responsible for health care services (i.e., federal health centres, provincial hospitals and Band Councils). Data were manually transcribed and coded using deductive and inductive thematic analysis.
Primary barriers reported were issues with overcrowding in houses, insufficient human resources and inadequate community awareness. Main areas for improvement included increasing human resources (i.e., nurses and trained health care professionals), funding for supplies and general community awareness regarding disease processes and prevention.
Government bodies should consider focusing efforts to provide more support in terms of human resources, monies and education. In addition, various government organizations should collaborate to improve housing conditions and timely access to resources. These recommendations should be addressed in future pandemic plans, so that remote western James Bay First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario and other similar communities can be better prepared for the next public health emergency.
PubMed ID
22030007 View in PubMed
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The 2009 Provincial decision to de-emphasize seasonal influenza vaccine in Canada: real-time risk-benefit analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136573
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Mar 15;52(6):829-30; author reply 830-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2011
Author
Perry R W Kendall
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Mar 15;52(6):829-30; author reply 830-1
Date
Mar-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Pandemics
Risk assessment
Vaccination - utilization
Notes
Comment On: Clin Infect Dis. 2010 Dec 15;51(12):1380-221067354
PubMed ID
21367739 View in PubMed
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Absenteeism among hospital staff during an influenza epidemic: implications for immunoprophylaxis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240175
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Sep 1;131(5):449-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1984
Author
G W Hammond
M. Cheang
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Sep 1;131(5):449-52
Date
Sep-1-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Canada
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Nursing Staff, Hospital
Personnel, Hospital
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The 1980-81 epidemic of influenza A/Bangkok 79 was responsible for increased absenteeism (1.7 times the rate for the corresponding period of the subsequent nonepidemic year) among selected hospital staff in Winnipeg's Health Sciences Centre. Retrospective study of employment records for 25 of the centre's largest departments showed excess sick-leave costs of about $24 500 during the 2-week period of peak absenteeism that included the epidemic. Although the centre was sampling prospectively for the virus the first positive results became available too late for chemoprophylactic measures to have been effective. The greater increase in absenteeism among nursing staff caring for patients with chronic respiratory disease and nurses working on general medical or pediatric acute infection/isolation wards suggested that these groups be targeted for influenza vaccination in hospitals.
Notes
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Cites: Pediatrics. 1975 May;55(5):673-71168894
Cites: JAMA. 1973 Mar 12;223(11):1233-54739326
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1971 Apr;123(4):446-545110741
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 1982;4:25-446754408
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Cites: JAMA. 1982 Mar 12;247(10):1451-37057536
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Cites: JAMA. 1980 Dec 5;244(22):2547-97431593
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Cites: J Pediatr. 1977 Dec;91(6):974-6925833
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1981 Nov;144(5):433-416273473
PubMed ID
6467117 View in PubMed
Less detail

Additive preventive effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in elderly persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57405
Source
Eur Respir J. 2004 Mar;23(3):363-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
B. Christenson
J. Hedlund
P. Lundbergh
A. Ortqvist
Author Affiliation
Dept of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Stockholm County, Sweden.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2004 Mar;23(3):363-8
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Hospital Mortality
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage
Pneumonia, Pneumococcal - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Vaccination
Abstract
In 1999, all individuals > or = 65 yrs of age (n=258,754) in Stockholm County, Sweden, were offered influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in a prospective study on the effectiveness of these vaccines in reducing the need for hospital treatment and death due to influenza, pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Data on hospitalisation and mortality during 1 yr were obtained from the administrative database in Stockholm County Council. Vaccination was performed in 124,702 (48%) subjects; 72,107 had both vaccines, 29,346 only had the influenza vaccine and 23,249 only had the pneumococcal vaccine. Compared with the unvaccinated cohort, a lower incidence of hospitalisation for all endpoint diagnoses was seen in vaccinated persons. An additive effectiveness of vaccination was seen when both vaccines were given, with a reduction of hospital admissions for influenza (37%), pneumonia (29%) and IPD (44%). In-hospital mortality for pneumonia was significantly lower in those who received both vaccines, than in unvaccinated persons. To conclude, vaccination with influenza and pneumococcal vaccines together was effective in reducing the need for hospital admission for influenza and pneumonia. There was a strong indication that pneumococcal vaccination alone, was effective not only in the prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease, but also of pneumonia overall, although to a low degree.
PubMed ID
15065822 View in PubMed
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[Advantages and disadvantages of inactivated and live influenza vaccine].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178960
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2004 Jul-Aug;49(4):4-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu Z Gendon
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2004 Jul-Aug;49(4):4-12
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Allergens - immunology
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Child
Clinical Trials as Topic
Egg Proteins - immunology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - etiology
Immunity, Mucosal
Immunization Schedule
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Russia - epidemiology
Vaccination - adverse effects
Vaccines, Attenuated - administration & dosage
Vaccines, Inactivated - administration & dosage
Abstract
Published data related with comparison studies of safety, efficiency and some other properties of cold-adapted live influenza vaccine (LIV) and of inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) are analyzed. LIV and IIV do not differ by systemic reactions after administration; however, it is not ruled out that there can be unfavorable reactions in vaccination of persons with allergy to the chicken-embryo proteins as well as in cases of persistence/reversion of cold-adapted strain observed in vaccination of persons with primary impairments of the immune system. There are no convincing data, up to now, on that LIV is superior to IIV in coping with influenza pandemics. The efficiency of LIV and IIV for children aged 3 years and more and for healthy adults is virtually identical. Additional controllable field comparative studies of LIV and IIV efficiency in immunization of elderly persons are needed. Limited data on LIV efficiency for children aged 2 months and more were obtained. The need in a 2-stage vaccination of all age group with the aim of ensuring responses to all 3 LIV components is, certainly, a LIV disadvantage. In case of IIV, the 2-stage vaccination is needed only for persons who were not ill with influenza. The intranasal LIV administration has, from the practical and psychological standpoints, an advantage before the IIV administration by syringe. The ability of LIV to protect from the drift influenza-virus variations could be its advantage before IIV; still, more research is needed to verify it. Transplantable cell lines meeting the WHO requirements could be an optimal substrate for the production of LIV and IIV. Children are the optimal age group for influenza prevention by cold-adapted LIV, whereas, IIV fits better for vaccination of adults and elderly persons.
PubMed ID
15293504 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Mar 6;164(5):680
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-6-2001

An Advisory Committee Statement (ACS). National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI). Statement on influenza vaccination for the 1998-1999 season.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203512
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1998 Jul 1;24:1-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1998
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1998 Jul 1;24:1-12
Date
Jul-1-1998
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Amantadine - therapeutic use
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Industry
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza Vaccines - contraindications - immunology - supply & distribution
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Risk factors
Vaccination - methods - standards
Abstract
The National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) provides Health Canada with ongoing and timely medical, scientific, and public-health advice relating to immunization. Health Canada acknowledges that the advice and recommendations set out in this statement are based upon the best current available scientific knowledge, and is disseminating this document for information purposes. Persons administering or using the vaccine should also be aware of the contents of the relevant product monograph(s). Recommendations for use and other information set out herein may differ from that set out in the monograph(s) of the Canadian licensed manufacturer(s) of the vaccine(s). Manufacturer(s) have only sought approval of the vaccine(s) and provided evidence as to its safety and efficacy when used in accordance with the product monographs.
Notes
Erratum In: Can Commun Dis Rep 1998 Jul 15;24(14):120
Erratum In: Can Commun Dis Rep 1998 Oct 15;24(20):168
PubMed ID
10330776 View in PubMed
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229 records – page 1 of 23.