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Acceptable protective efficacy of influenza vaccination in young military conscripts under circumstances of incomplete antigenic and genetic match.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194986
Source
Vaccine. 2001 Apr 30;19(23-24):3253-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-2001
Author
R. Pyhälä
M. Haanpää
M. Kleemola
R. Tervahauta
R. Visakorpi
L. Kinnunen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. reijo.pyhala@ktl.fi
Source
Vaccine. 2001 Apr 30;19(23-24):3253-60
Date
Apr-30-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amino Acid Sequence
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Antigens, Viral - genetics
Base Sequence
DNA Primers - genetics
Disease Outbreaks
Finland - epidemiology
Genes, Viral
Humans
Influenza A virus - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Influenza Vaccines - genetics - immunology - pharmacology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control - virology
Male
Military Personnel
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Abstract
Commercial inactivated parenteral influenza vaccines reduced febrile (> or = 38 degrees C) respiratory illness by 53% (95% CL: 41-63%) during a 3 week outbreak in 1998 when A/Sydney/5/97(H3N2)-like influenza viruses were shown to be the predominant etiological agents and an older antigenic variant, A/Nanchang/933/95, served as the vaccine virus. The calculatory efficacy for preventing virologically diagnosed influenza infections was 57% (95% CL: 40-68%). The study population consisted of 1374 young male military conscripts. Vaccination coverage on a voluntary basis was 67%. Vaccination was ineffective in preventing febrile illness during a second epidemic wave lasting 2 weeks when mainly adenoviruses were shown to have been circulating in the garrison. Out of the 36 nasopharyngeal aspirates positive for influenza A by antigen detection, 18 A/Sydney/5/97-like strains (10 from non-vaccinated and eight from vaccinated subjects) and two A/Nanchang/933/95-like strains (both from non-vaccinated subjects) were isolated in MDCK cell cultures. Intraepidemic variation was detected among the A/Sydney/5/97-like field strains in their HA1 sequences and reactivity in HI tests, but no evidence was obtained that this variation would have been of significance to the virus in breaking through the vaccination-induced immunity.
PubMed ID
11312022 View in PubMed
Less detail

A(H1N1) pandemic influenza and its prevention by vaccination: paediatricians' opinions before and after the beginning of the vaccination campaign.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136801
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:128
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Eve Dubé
Defay Fannie
Gilca Vladimir
Bettinger A Julie
Sauvageau Chantal
Lavoie France
Boucher D François
McNeil Shelly
Gemmill Ian
Boulianne Nicole
Author Affiliation
Institut National de Santé publique du Québec, 2400 d'Estimauville, Québec, Canada. eve.dube@ssss.gouv.qc.ca.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:128
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Clinical Competence
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Immunization Programs - utilization
Infant
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Male
Pediatrics
Physicians
Abstract
In June 2009, the World Health Organization declared an A(H1N1) influenza pandemic. In October 2009, the largest vaccination campaign in Canadian history began. The aim of this study was to document paediatricians' knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) regarding A(H1N1) pandemic influenza and its prevention by vaccination just after the beginning of the A(H1N1) vaccination campaign and to compare the results with those obtained before campaign initiation.
A self-administered mail-based questionnaire was sent to all Canadian paediatricians. Questionnaires were analyzed in two subsets: those received before and after the beginning of the vaccination campaign.
Overall the response rate was 50%. Respondents' characteristics were comparable between the two subsets. Before the beginning of the campaign, 63% of paediatricians perceived A(H1N1) pandemic infection as a serious disease, that would occur frequently without vaccination compared to more than 75% after. Before the vaccination campaign, half of respondents or less thought that the A(H1N1) vaccine was safe (50%) and effective (35%) compared to 77% and 72% after. The proportion of paediatricians who reported they had received sufficient information on A(H1N1) vaccine increased from 31% before to 73% after the beginning of the vaccination campaign. The majority of respondents intended to get vaccinated against A(H1N1) influenza themselves (84% before and 92% after). Respondents' intention to recommend the A(H1N1) vaccine to their patients increased from 80% before the beginning of the campaign to 92% after. In multivariate analysis, the main determinants of paediatricians' intention to recommend the A(H1N1) vaccine were their intention to get vaccinated against A(H1N1) influenza themselves and a belief that A(H1N1) vaccine would be well accepted by health professionals who administer vaccines to the public.
Results of this study show important increases in physicians' level of confidence about A(H1N1) vaccine's safety and immunogenicity and their willingness to recommend this vaccine to their patients. These changes could be explained, at least partially, by the important effort done by public health authorities to disseminate information regarding A(H1N1) vaccination.
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 May 15;164(10):1413-911387913
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Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2001 Dec 10-24;161(22):2702-811732935
PubMed ID
21342511 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibody responses against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus after sequential vaccination with pandemic and seasonal influenza vaccines in Finnish healthcare professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121384
Source
Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2013 May;7(3):431-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Mari Strengell
Niina Ikonen
Thedi Ziegler
Anu Kantele
Veli-Jukka Anttila
Ilkka Julkunen
Author Affiliation
Virology Unit, Department of Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. mari.strengell@thl.fi
Source
Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2013 May;7(3):431-8
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - immunology
Antibody formation
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Personnel
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - classification - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control - virology
Middle Aged
Phylogeny
Vaccination
Young Adult
Abstract
Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus has been circulating in human population for three epidemic seasons. During this time, monovalent pandemic and trivalent seasonal influenza vaccination against this virus have been offered to Finnish healthcare professionals. It is, however, unclear how well vaccine-induced antibodies recognize different strains of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 circulating in the population and whether the booster vaccination with seasonal influenza vaccine would broaden the antibody cross-reactivity.
Influenza vaccine-induced humoral immunity against several isolates of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus was analyzed in healthcare professionals. Age-dependent responses were also analyzed.
Influenza viruses were selected to represent viruses that circulated in Finland during two consecutive influenza epidemic seasons 2009-2010 and 2010-2011. Serum samples from vaccinated volunteers, age 20-64 years, were collected before and after vaccination with AS03-adjuvanted pandemic and non-adjuvanted trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine that was given 1 year later.
Single dose of pandemic vaccine induced a good albeit variable antibody response. On day 21 after vaccination, depending on the virus strain, 14-75% of vaccinated had reached antibody titers (=1:40) considered seroprotective. The booster vaccination 1 year later with a seasonal vaccine elevated the seroprotection rate to 57-98%. After primary immunization, younger individuals (20-48 years) had significantly higher antibody titers against all tested viruses than older persons (49-64 years) but this difference disappeared after the seasonal booster vaccination.
Even a few amino acid changes in influenza A HA may compromise the vaccine-induced antibody recognition. Older adults (49 years and older) may benefit more from repeated influenza vaccinations.
PubMed ID
22913369 View in PubMed
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[Body immunocorrection when vaccination is contraindicated (a clinico-epidemiological validation)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223369
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1992 Aug;(8):31-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1992
Author
S M Furgal
A A Degtiarev
A M Zemskov
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1992 Aug;(8):31-4
Date
Aug-1992
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adjuvants, Immunologic - administration & dosage
Drug Evaluation
Humans
Influenza A virus - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - contraindications - immunology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Military Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Nucleic Acids - administration & dosage
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - immunology
Russia - epidemiology
Vaccines, Inactivated - immunology
Abstract
The article summarizes the results of epidemiological observation which was performed in one of the training units. The goals of this observation were to estimate the prophylactic efficiency of the selected application of Natrii nucleinas in persons with the lowered immunoresistance on the background of antigrip immunization. A high clinico-epidemiological effectiveness ws approved for 10-days administration of the Natrii nucleinas in persons with clinic manifestations of grip and other respiratory infections at the moment of vaccination. It is resulted in the diminishing of the morbidity index, duration and gravity of this pathology in the postvaccinal period. The administration of Natrii nucleinas was experimentally substantiated during this epidemiological observation.
PubMed ID
1441268 View in PubMed
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Cross-reactive antibody to swine influenza A(H3N2) subtype virus in children and adults before and after immunisation with 2010/11 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine in Canada, August to November 2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127415
Source
Euro Surveill. 2012;17(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
D M Skowronski
G. De Serres
N Z Janjua
J L Gardy
V. Gilca
M. Dionne
M E Hamelin
C. Rhéaume
G. Boivin
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver, Canada. danuta.skowronski@@bccdc.ca
Source
Euro Surveill. 2012;17(4)
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - biosynthesis - metabolism
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross Reactions - immunology
Female
Humans
Infant
Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - immunology - therapeutic use
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Swine
Vaccines, Inactivated - immunology - therapeutic use
Young Adult
Abstract
In pre- and post-immunisation sera from children (17-120 months-old) and adults (20-59 years-old) immunised with 2010/11 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine, we assessed age-related patterns of sero-susceptibility and vaccine-induced cross-reactive antibodies to a representative swine H3N2 (swH3N2) and a related ancestral human H3N2 (A/Sydney/5/1997) influenza virus. Few children but a greater proportion of adults showed pre-immunisation haemagglutination inhibition titres =40 to either virus. Titres increased with age among children but decreased in adults. Fewer than 20% showed a four-fold rise in antibody titres to either virus following immunisation. Further investigation is warranted to guide ongoing risk assessment and response to emerging swine H3N2 viruses.
PubMed ID
22297136 View in PubMed
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Determinants of A (H1N1) vaccination: cross-sectional study in a population of pregnant women in Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138000
Source
Vaccine. 2011 Feb 17;29(9):1824-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-17-2011
Author
Paul Fabry
Arnaud Gagneur
Jean-Charles Pasquier
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research Centre Etienne-Le Bel, Sherbrooke University Hospital Centre, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada. paul.fabry@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Vaccine. 2011 Feb 17;29(9):1824-9
Date
Feb-17-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Pregnancy
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Because of the risk of complication, pregnant women were a priority target for vaccination during the A (H1N1) pandemic influenza. In Quebec, 63% of pregnant women were vaccinated, which is a higher rate than vaccination against seasonal influenza. However, the behaviour of pregnant women relative to the vaccination during the H1N1 pandemic is unknown. The present study was aimed at identifying factors influencing the decision-making of pregnant women regarding H1N1 vaccination.
A cross-sectional survey was conducted in February 2010 in pregnant women or in early postpartum at the Sherbrooke University Hospital Centre using a self-administered questionnaire based on the Health Belief Model (HBM). Data items collected were: socio-demographic data, vaccination status, information sources consulted, knowledge on vaccination, and the HBM dimensions: effectiveness and risks of vaccination, severity and vulnerability towards the influenza. The associations between questionnaire variables and vaccination status were assessed by univariate and multivariate analysis.
Of the 250 women interviewed, 95% knew that the vaccination was recommended, but only 76% received the vaccine. Variables positively associated with vaccination were late vaccination during pregnancy (OR=7.3, 95% CI 2.1-25.3), belief in the efficacy of the vaccine (OR=7, 95% CI 2-23.4), and consultation of the Pandémie-Québec website (OR=4.5, 95% CI 1.5-13.4). However, the belief that the vaccine had not been adequately tested (OR=0.08, 95% CI 0.02-0.35) and consultation of mainstream websites (OR=0.22, 95% CI 0.06-0.81) were associated with lower vaccination rates.
The vast majority of pregnant women were aware of the recommendations relative to A (H1N1) vaccination. Internet media played an important role in their decision to get vaccinated. Better information on the safety of the vaccine must be prepared for future pandemics.
PubMed ID
21219988 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effectiveness of pandemic and seasonal influenza vaccines in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza in adults: a clinical cohort study during epidemic seasons 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267970
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e108538
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ritva K Syrjänen
Jukka Jokinen
Thedi Ziegler
Jonas Sundman
Mika Lahdenkari
Ilkka Julkunen
Terhi M Kilpi
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e108538
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - therapeutic use
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Vaccination
Young Adult
Abstract
One dose of pandemic influenza vaccine Pandemrix (GlaxoSmithKline) was offered to the entire population of Finland in 2009-10. We conducted a prospective clinical cohort study to determine the vaccine effectiveness in preventing febrile laboratory-confirmed influenza infection during the influenza season 2009-10 and continued the study in 2010-11.
In total, 3,518 community dwelling adults aged 18-75 years living in Tampere city were enrolled. The participants were not assigned to any vaccination regimen, but they could participate in the study regardless of their vaccination status or intention to be vaccinated with the pandemic or seasonal influenza vaccine. They were asked to report if they received Pandemrix in 2009-10 and/or trivalent influenza vaccine in 2010-11. Vaccinations were verified from medical records. The participants were instructed to report all acute symptoms of respiratory tract infection with fever (at least 38°C) and pneumonias to the study staff. Nasal and oral swabs were obtained within 5-7 days after symptom onset and influenza-specific RNA was identified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.
In 2009-10, the estimated vaccine effectiveness was 81% (95%CI 30-97). However, the vaccine effectiveness could not be estimated reliably, because only persons in prioritized groups were vaccinated before/during the first pandemic wave and many participants were enrolled when they already had the symptoms of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza infection. In 2010-11, 2,276 participants continued the follow-up. The vaccine effectiveness, adjusted for potential confounding factors was 81% (95%CI 41-96) for Pandemrix only and 88% (95%CI 63-97) for either Pandemrix or trivalent influenza vaccine 2010-11 or both, respectively.
Vaccination with an AS03-adjuvanted pandemic vaccine in 2009-10 was still effective in preventing A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza during the following epidemic season in 2010-11.
ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01024725. NCT01206114.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25265186 View in PubMed
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Effectiveness of the live attenuated and the inactivated influenza vaccine in two-year-olds - a nationwide cohort study Finland, influenza season 2015/16.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281714
Source
Euro Surveill. 2016 Sep 22;21(38)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-22-2016
Author
Hanna Nohynek
Ulrike Baum
Ritva Syrjänen
Niina Ikonen
Jonas Sundman
Jukka Jokinen
Source
Euro Surveill. 2016 Sep 22;21(38)
Date
Sep-22-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunization Programs
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Laboratories
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Seasons
Sentinel Surveillance
Vaccination - statistics & numerical data
Vaccines, Attenuated - administration & dosage - immunology
Vaccines, Inactivated - administration & dosage - immunology
Abstract
Although widely recommended, influenza vaccination of children is part of the national vaccination programme only in few countries. In addition to Canada and the United States (US), in Europe Finland and the United Kingdom have introduced live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) for healthy children in their programmes. On 22 June 2016, the US Advisory Committee on Immunizations Practices, voted against further use of LAIV due to no observed vaccine effectiveness (VE) over three consecutive influenza seasons (2013/14 to 2015/16). We summarise the results of a nationwide, register-based cohort study (N=55,258 of whom 8,086 received LAIV and 4,297 TIV); all outcome (laboratory-confirmed influenza), exposure (vaccination) and confounding variable data were retrieved from four computerised national health registers, which were linked via a unique personal identity code assigned to all permanent Finnish residents regardless of nationality. Our study provides evidence of moderate effectiveness against any laboratory-confirmed influenza of the quadrivalent LAIV vaccine (VE: 51%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 28-66%) as well as the inactivated trivalent vaccine (VE: 61%; 95% CI: 31-78%) among two-year-olds during the influenza season 2015/16 in Finland. Based on these data, Finland will continue using LAIV for young children in its National Immunisation Programme this coming influenza season.
Notes
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Cites: Int Stat Rev. 2010 Apr;78(1):40-6421743766
PubMed ID
27684447 View in PubMed
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[Effect of a complex system of controlling influenza on a citywide scale on the etiological structure of acute respiratory diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242089
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1983 Apr;(4):50-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1983
Author
V M Gagarinova
Iu G Kustikova
E V Oleinikova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1983 Apr;(4):50-3
Date
Apr-1983
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Russia
Urban Population
Abstract
Materials on the etiological structure of acute respiratory diseases (ARD) and the spread of respiratory virus infection among the population of the city under the conditions of mass vaccinal prophylaxis and chemoprophylaxis are presented. These materials indicate that the proportion of influenza A virus in the etiological structure of ARD decreased by half as the result of introducing the complex system of influenza control in the city. The proportion of other causative agents of ARD before and after introducing the complex system of influenza control irregularly varied among different age groups of the population without statistical significance. The indices characterizing the spread of influenza A virus infection among the population of the whole city were found to be significantly decreased during the second period of observation.
PubMed ID
6223474 View in PubMed
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Effect of vaccines and antivirals during the major 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic wave in Norway--and the influence of vaccination timing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127874
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(1):e30018
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Birgitte Freiesleben de Blasio
Bjørn G Iversen
Gianpaolo Scalia Tomba
Author Affiliation
Department of Biostatistics, Institute of Basic Medical Science, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. birgitte.deblasio@medisin.uio.no
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(1):e30018
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjuvants, Immunologic - administration & dosage
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Basic Reproduction Number
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - immunology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control - transmission
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Norway - epidemiology
Pandemics - prevention & control
Prevalence
Sensitivity and specificity
Time Factors
Vaccination
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate the impact of mass vaccination with adjuvanted vaccines (eventually 40% population coverage) and antivirals during the 2009 influenza pandemic in Norway, we fitted an age-structured SEIR model using data on vaccinations and sales of antivirals in 2009/10 in Norway to Norwegian ILI surveillance data from 5 October 2009 to 4 January 2010. We estimate a clinical attack rate of approximately 30% (28.7-29.8%), with highest disease rates among children 0-14 years (43-44%). Vaccination started in week 43 and came too late to have a strong influence on the pandemic in Norway. Our results indicate that the countermeasures prevented approximately 11-12% of potential cases relative to an unmitigated pandemic. Vaccination was found responsible for roughly 3 in 4 of the avoided infections. An estimated 50% reduction in the clinical attack rate would have resulted from vaccination alone, had the campaign started 6 weeks earlier. Had vaccination been prioritized for children first, the intervention should have commenced approximately 5 weeks earlier in order to achieve the same 50% reduction. In comparison, we estimate that a non-adjuvanted vaccination program should have started 8 weeks earlier to lower the clinical attack rate by 50%. In conclusion, vaccination timing was a critical factor in relation to the spread of the 2009 A(H1N1) influenza. Our results also corroborate the central role of children for the transmission of A(H1N1) pandemic influenza.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22253862 View in PubMed
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