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25 records – page 1 of 3.

Source
Nature. 2005 Oct 6;437(7060):794-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-6-2005
Source
Nature. 2005 Oct 6;437(7060):794-5
Date
Oct-6-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Biomedical Research - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Bioterrorism - prevention & control
Evolution, Molecular
Female
History, 20th Century
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history - prevention & control - virology
Orthomyxoviridae - genetics - pathogenicity
Publishing
Time Factors
Virulence - genetics
Virulence Factors
Notes
Comment In: Nature. 2006 Jan 19;439(7074):26616421546
Comment On: Nature. 2005 Oct 6;437(7060):889-9316208372
Erratum In: Nature. 2005 Oct 13;437(7061):940
PubMed ID
16208326 View in PubMed
Less detail

1951 influenza epidemic, England and Wales, Canada, and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169257
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Apr;12(4):661-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Cécile Viboud
Theresa Tam
Douglas Fleming
Mark A Miller
Lone Simonsen
Author Affiliation
National Institutes of Health, Fogarty International Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. viboudc@mail.nih.gov
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Apr;12(4):661-8
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - history
England - epidemiology
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history
Middle Aged
Seasons
United States - epidemiology
Wales - epidemiology
Abstract
Influenza poses a continuing public health threat in epidemic and pandemic seasons. The 1951 influenza epidemic (A/H1N1) caused an unusually high death toll in England; in particular, weekly deaths in Liverpool even surpassed those of the 1918 pandemic. We further quantified the death rate of the 1951 epidemic in 3 countries. In England and Canada, we found that excess death rates from pneumonia and influenza and all causes were substantially higher for the 1951 epidemic than for the 1957 and 1968 pandemics (by > or =50%). The age-specific pattern of deaths in 1951 was consistent with that of other interpandemic seasons; no age shift to younger age groups, reminiscent of pandemics, occurred in the death rate. In contrast to England and Canada, the 1951 epidemic was not particularly severe in the United States. Why this epidemic was so severe in some areas but not others remains unknown and highlights major gaps in our understanding of interpandemic influenza.
Notes
Cites: Vaccine. 1999 Jul 30;17 Suppl 1:S3-1010471173
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2005 Jul 15;192(2):233-4815962218
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1951 Nov 16;66(46):1487-151614875911
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1951 Sep;42(9):367-7414879284
Cites: Proc R Soc Med. 1951 Sep;44(9):789-80114891780
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Aug 2;102(31):11059-6316046546
Cites: Science. 2005 Aug 12;309(5737):98916099952
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2002 Aug 6;99(16):10748-5212136133
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2004 Jan;10(1):32-915078594
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Sep 1;160(5):492-50215321847
Cites: Nat Rev Microbiol. 2004 Nov;2(11):909-1415494747
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1967 Sep;86(2):433-416058395
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 1969;41(3):393-85309444
Cites: Stat Bull Metropol Life Insur Co. 1971 Jul;52:8-115094444
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1971 Oct;94(4):348-505110551
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 1973;49(3):219-334546520
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1987 Jun;77(6):712-63578619
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1997 Dec;87(12):1944-509431281
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1998 Jul;178(1):53-609652423
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 1952;6(3):287-31512988024
Cites: Lancet. 1958 Jan 11;1(7011):95-713503223
Cites: Nat Med. 2004 Dec;10(12 Suppl):S82-715577936
Cites: Nature. 2004 Dec 16;432(7019):904-615602562
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2005 Feb 14;165(3):265-7215710788
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2005 Apr;133(2):255-6215816150
Cites: Br Med J. 1951 Oct 20;2(4737):921-714869766
PubMed ID
16704816 View in PubMed
Less detail

Agent-based modeling of the spread of the 1918-1919 flu in three Canadian fur trading communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141452
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2010 Nov-Dec;22(6):757-67
Publication Type
Article
Author
Caroline A O'Neil
Lisa Sattenspiel
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211, USA. cahillen@yahoo.com
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2010 Nov-Dec;22(6):757-67
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Epidemics
History, 20th Century
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history
Manitoba - epidemiology
Population Dynamics - history - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population - history - statistics & numerical data
Seasons
Abstract
Previous attempts to study the 1918-1919 flu in three small communities in central Manitoba have used both three-community population-based and single-community agent-based models. These studies identified critical factors influencing epidemic spread, but they also left important questions unanswered. The objective of this project was to design a more realistic agent-based model that would overcome limitations of earlier models and provide new insights into these outstanding questions.
The new model extends the previous agent-based model to three communities so that results can be compared to those from the population-based model. Sensitivity testing was conducted, and the new model was used to investigate the influence of seasonal settlement and mobility patterns, the geographic heterogeneity of the observed 1918-1919 epidemic in Manitoba, and other questions addressed previously.
Results confirm outcomes from the population-based model that suggest that (a) social organization and mobility strongly influence the timing and severity of epidemics and (b) the impact of the epidemic would have been greater if it had arrived in the summer rather than the winter. New insights from the model suggest that the observed heterogeneity among communities in epidemic impact was not unusual and would have been the expected outcome given settlement structure and levels of interaction among communities.
Application of an agent-based computer simulation has helped to better explain observed patterns of spread of the 1918-1919 flu epidemic in central Manitoba. Contrasts between agent-based and population-based models illustrate the advantages of agent-based models for the study of small populations.
PubMed ID
20721982 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alexander (Sasha) I. Klimov, PhD, ScD (1943-2013).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114669
Source
Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2013 May;7(3):356-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Jacqueline Katz
Julie Villanueva
Ann Moen
Nancy Cox
Author Affiliation
Influenza Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
Source
Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2013 May;7(3):356-7
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history - virology
Orthomyxoviridae - genetics - physiology
Public Health - history
Russia
United States
PubMed ID
23594214 View in PubMed
Less detail

Almost only women: Canadian volunteer response to the 1918-1920 pandemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145808
Source
Am J Disaster Med. 2009 Nov-Dec;4(6):331-43
Publication Type
Article
Author
Joseph Scanlon
Hurrell Casey
Terry McMahon
Author Affiliation
Emergency Communications Unit, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Disaster Med. 2009 Nov-Dec;4(6):331-43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - history
Emergency Service, Hospital - history - manpower
Female
History, 20th Century
Home Care Services - history - manpower
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history
Male
Volunteers - history
Abstract
When pandemic influenza arrived from the United States in 1918-1920 to strike Canada with devastating force, the health system was overwhelmed. Although emergency hospitals were established in public buildings including schools and universities, many sick remained in their homes. Because of the war, many physicians and nurses were overseas. Many of those who were in Canada became flu victims. The result was a massive call for volunteers. Although a few men responded, most volunteers were women. These women, many of whom had little or no training, risked their lives by acting as nurses in existing and emergency hospitals and by assisting sick families in their homes. Many became ill and some died. The result is an incredible portrait of volunteer response to a major medical emergency.
PubMed ID
20104726 View in PubMed
Less detail

Baptism of fire: New Brunswick's public health movement and the 1918 influenza epidemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157463
Source
Can Bull Med Hist. 2007;24(2):317-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Jane E Jenkins
Author Affiliation
Science and Technology Studies, St. Thomas University, Fredericton, New Brunswick.
Source
Can Bull Med Hist. 2007;24(2):317-42
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disease Outbreaks - history
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history
New Brunswick
Public Health Administration - history
Abstract
In the fall of 1918 when war-weary New Brunswickers were hit by the influenza pandemic, theirs was the only Canadian province with a Minister of Health, the first to be appointed anywhere in the British Empire. But it was a new position and a controversial one. This paper traces the growth of a public health movement in New Brunswick in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the campaign for the establishment of a provincial Department of Health, and the role played by the 1918 influenza epidemic in legitimizing and consolidating the newly minted Department, masthead of the public health movement.
PubMed ID
18447309 View in PubMed
Less detail

"Co-operation in All Human Endeavour": quarantine and immigrant disease vectors in the 1918-1919 influenza pandemic in Winnipeg.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174170
Source
Can Bull Med Hist. 2005;22(1):57-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Esyllt W Jones
Author Affiliation
Institute of Historical Research, University of London.
Source
Can Bull Med Hist. 2005;22(1):57-82
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cholera - history - prevention & control - transmission
Disease Outbreaks - history - prevention & control
Disease Transmission, Infectious - history - prevention & control
Emigration and Immigration - history
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history - prevention & control - transmission
Quarantine - history
Abstract
Unlike occurrences of other contagious diseases such as cholera and smallpox, the 1918-19 influenza pandemic did not lead to anti-immigrant backlash, the stigmatization of newcomers as disease carriers, or aggressive quarantine measures focused against immigrant groups. During influenza outbreaks in several major Canadian cities, quarantine was either rejected or was a low-priority containment measure, reluctantly and sceptically employed. Blaming immigrants during the epidemic was not considered enlightened public health practice or good disease containment strategy. Retrospective evaluation of the successes and failures of the fight against influenza concluded that coercive measures such as quarantine did more harm than good. The experience with influenza contributed to new notions of immigrant inclusion in the social body.
PubMed ID
15977380 View in PubMed
Less detail

The design and use of an agent-based model to simulate the 1918 influenza epidemic at Norway House, Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153493
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2009 May-Jun;21(3):290-300
Publication Type
Article
Author
Connie Carpenter
Lisa Sattenspiel
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. cvc18b@netzero.com
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2009 May-Jun;21(3):290-300
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disease Outbreaks - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history - transmission
Manitoba - epidemiology
Models, Biological
Population Dynamics
Seasons
Abstract
Agent-based modeling provides a new approach to the study of virgin soil epidemics like the 1918 flu. In this bottom-up simulation approach, a landscape can be created and populated with a heterogeneous group of agents who move and interact in ways that more closely resemble human behavior than is usually seen in other modeling techniques. In this project, an agent-based model was constructed to simulate the spread of the 1918 influenza pandemic through the Norway House community in Manitoba, Canada. Archival, ethnographic, epidemiological, and biological information were used to aid in designing the structure of the model and to estimate values for model parameters. During the epidemic, Norway House was a Hudson's Bay Company post and a Swampy Cree-Métis settlement with an economy based on hunting, fishing, and the fur trade. The community followed a traditional, seasonal travel pattern of summer aggregation and winter dispersal. The model was used to examine how seasonal community structures and associated population movement patterns may have influenced disease transmission and epidemic spread. Simulations of the model clearly demonstrate that human behavior can significantly influence epidemic outcomes.
PubMed ID
19107906 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dr Montizambert and the 1918-1919 Spanish influenza pandemic in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143620
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 May;56(5):453-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Ian A Cameron
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 May;56(5):453-4
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Canada - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - history
Europe - epidemiology
History, 20th Century
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history - mortality
Public Health - history
World War I
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1926 Mar;16(3):314-920315725
PubMed ID
20463276 View in PubMed
Less detail

25 records – page 1 of 3.