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1999-2000 influenza season: Canadian laboratory diagnoses and strain characterization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196284
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2000 Nov 15;26(22):185-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2000
Author
Y. Li
Author Affiliation
Respiratory Viruses Section, National Microbiology Laboratory, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Winnipeg, Man.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2000 Nov 15;26(22):185-9
Date
Nov-15-2000
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antiviral Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Influenza A virus - drug effects - isolation & purification
Influenza B virus - drug effects - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - drug therapy - epidemiology - virology
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Population Surveillance
PubMed ID
11131691 View in PubMed
Less detail

Experience with oseltamivir in the control of a nursing home influenza B outbreak.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195286
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2001 Mar 1;27(5):37-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2001
Author
R. Parker
N. Loewen
D. Skowronski
Author Affiliation
Simon Fraser Health Region, B.C. Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver, British Columbia.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2001 Mar 1;27(5):37-40
Date
Mar-1-2001
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetamides - therapeutic use
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cross Infection - prevention & control
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Humans
Influenza B virus - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - drug therapy - epidemiology - virology
Nursing Homes
Oseltamivir
Abstract
Oseltamivir prophylaxis was very effective in protecting nursing home residents from ILI and in halting this outbreak of influenza B. A portion of the total ILI cases may have been due to influenza A, as this strain was isolated in one resident. The 10% attack rate in this facility, controlled with oseltamivir, compares favourably with another influenza B outbreak in a similar facility in the same region, over the same time frame (ILI onset 27 December to 17 January). Oseltamivir prophylaxis was not used to manage this second outbreak of laboratory-confirmed influenza B. Of the 236 residents, 45 developed ILI for an overall attack rate of 19%, nearly double the rate in the oseltamivir-controlled setting (10%). While oseltamivir was effective in controlling influenza B in this outbreak, further experience and evaluation is required before it can be routinely recommended for prophylaxis of influenza in nursing home outbreaks. Although earlier attempts by others using oseltamivir in the control of influenza A outbreaks have also met with success, it is not yet licensed for this purpose. Compared to amantadine, oseltamivir has a relatively high cost for the control of influenza A outbreaks and this may continue to limit its wider acceptance. The cost-effectiveness of oseltamivir in the control of influenza B outbreaks needs to be specifically addressed given the typically milder nature of influenza B strains. However, such a distinction is not clinically reliable and elderly residents of long-term care facilities remain vulnerable to serious complications associated with influenza infection in general. An alternate agent for influenza chemoprophylaxis that is effective against both influenza A and B, is easily administered and has few side effects, could greatly enhance current prevention and control measures and warrants serious assessment. The spread of this outbreak from the geographically separate ward to other areas of the facility in which residents had not received prophylaxis, underscores the likely role of staff as a vehicle for transmission during facility outbreaks. While accurate staff ILI rates could not be determined, their immunization rates were low, and many staff were ill during the outbreak. Isolation of residents with ILI and prophylaxis of non-ill residents on the initial outbreak wards was insufficient to prevent the spread of the outbreak, although it was subsequently halted once prophylaxis was extended to all residents. In view of the uncertainty over this medication's widespread use, in the absence of licensure or previous studies demonstrating its effectiveness in the prophylaxis and control of influenza B outbreaks, initiation of oseltamivir prophylaxis was staggered by ward. In a declared influenza A outbreak, the protocol in a long term care facility is to initiate amantadine prophylaxis on all residents, rather than ward-by-ward. While anti-viral prophylaxis may be an effective secondary control measure in the management of influenza outbreaks, optimal primary prevention would be more effective. This would require increased vaccine coverage of residents and particularly of staff, who play an important role in the importation and transmission of influenza within these facilities.
PubMed ID
11260987 View in PubMed
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[Pandemic influenza in Russia: specific features of clinical course and the absence of early etiotropic therapy as a risk factor of severe forms of the disease].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129071
Source
Ter Arkh. 2011;83(9):48-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
L V Kolobukhina
L N Merkulova
M Iu Shchelkanov
E I Burtseva
V V Lavrishcheva
E I Samokhvalov
S V Al'khovskii
A G Prilipov
E S Proshina
S N Avdeev
O A Sutochnikova
M V Bazarova
E I Kelli
N D Tserukalova
I A Blank
O M Shestakova
O N Kolivashko
T V Arseneva
O E Ambrosi
A A Shul'diakov
A F Popov
A I Simakova
N A Malyshev
A G Chuchalin
D K L'vov
Source
Ter Arkh. 2011;83(9):48-53
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Amides - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Antiviral Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Caproates
Dicarboxylic Acids - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Humans
Imidazoles - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - drug therapy - epidemiology - virology
Male
Middle Aged
Oseltamivir - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Pandemics
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess efficacy and safety of ingavirin in the treatment of the flu caused by pandemic virus of flu A (H1N1) sw1 in hospitalized patients compared with oseltamivir.
A population-based comparative multicenter trial included 194 patients with verified diagnosis of the flu aged 18-60 years with marked clinical symptoms, body temperature over 38 degrees C and duration of the disease 48 hours maximum. The patients were randomized into 2 groups: group 1 (n=152) received ingavirin (90 mg once a day), group 2 received oseltamivir (n=42) in a dose 150 mg twice a day. Duration of the course was 5 days.
Ingavirin and oseltamivir normalized body temperature within treatment hours 24-36 if therapy was initiated in the first disease hours 27.0 +/- 10.0 and 31.9 +/- 10.4. Mean duration of the fever for ingavirin was 35.1 +/- 14.5 hours, for oseltamivir--26.3 +/- 13.0 hours (p
PubMed ID
22145388 View in PubMed
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[Sensitivity of the epidemic and pandemic influenza virus strains to zanamivir (Relenze) in in vitro experiments].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136422
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2010 Nov-Dec;55(6):10-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
D K L'vov
E I Burtseva
G A Galegov
N V Beliakova
E S Shevchenko
L V Kolobukhina
L N Merkulova
A G Prilipov
I A Leneva
N I Baranov
V N Gorelikov
D D Abramov
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2010 Nov-Dec;55(6):10-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antiviral Agents - pharmacology
Cell Line
Disease Outbreaks
Dogs
Drug Resistance, Viral
Humans
Influenza A virus - drug effects - enzymology
Influenza B virus - drug effects - enzymology
Influenza, Human - drug therapy - epidemiology - virology
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Neuraminidase - antagonists & inhibitors
Oseltamivir - pharmacology
Russia - epidemiology
Viral Proteins - antagonists & inhibitors
Zanamivir - pharmacology
Abstract
The paper presents the results of the first Russian experience in evaluating the sensitivity of the epidemic and pandemic influenza virus strains, circulating in the period 2009-2010, to the anti-neuraminidase drug zanamivir. A complex of studies, including enzyme immunoassay, fluorometric assay and partial sequence of the neuraminidases (NA1 and NA2) from influenza A virus strain, was applied. The findings Indicate that all the test strains, including those resistant to oseltamivir, were susceptible to zanamivir. The latter is recommended by the WHO for the prevention and treatment of influenza in pregnant women.
PubMed ID
21381333 View in PubMed
Less detail

Severity of influenza A 2009 (H1N1) pneumonia is underestimated by routine prediction rules. Results from a prospective, population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119812
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(10):e46816
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Agnar Bjarnason
Gudlaug Thorleifsdottir
Arthur Löve
Janus F Gudnason
Hilmir Asgeirsson
Kristinn L Hallgrimsson
Berglind S Kristjansdottir
Gunnsteinn Haraldsson
Olafur Baldursson
Karl G Kristinsson
Magnus Gottfredsson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(10):e46816
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Coinfection - drug therapy - microbiology - virology
Community-Acquired Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - drug effects - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - drug therapy - epidemiology - virology
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Mycoplasma pneumoniae - drug effects - isolation & purification
Oseltamivir - therapeutic use
Pandemics
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Pneumonia, Bacterial - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Prospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Streptococcus pneumoniae - drug effects - isolation & purification
Abstract
Characteristics of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to pandemic influenza A 2009 (H1N1) have been inadequately compared to CAP caused by other respiratory pathogens. The performance of prediction rules for CAP during an epidemic with a new infectious agent are unknown.
Prospective, population-based study from November 2008-November 2009, in centers representing 70% of hospital beds in Iceland. Patients admitted with CAP underwent evaluation and etiologic testing, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for influenza. Data on influenza-like illness in the community and overall hospital admissions were collected. Clinical and laboratory data, including pneumonia severity index (PSI) and CURB-65 of patients with CAP due to H1N1 were compared to those caused by other agents.
Of 338 consecutive and eligible patients 313 (93%) were enrolled. During the pandemic peak, influenza A 2009 (H1N1) patients constituted 38% of admissions due to CAP. These patients were younger, more dyspnoeic and more frequently reported hemoptysis. They had significantly lower severity scores than other patients with CAP (1.23 vs. 1.61, P= .02 for CURB-65, 2.05 vs. 2.87 for PSI, P
Notes
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PubMed ID
23071646 View in PubMed
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[The specific features of the cocirculation of influenza viruses in the 2010-2011 postpandemic period according to the results of activities of the D. I. Ivanovsky Research Institute of Virology, Ministry of Health and Social Development of Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124100
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2012 Jan-Feb;57(1):20-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
E I Burtseva
D K L'vov
M Iu Shchelkanov
L V Kolobukhina
A G Prilipov
S V Al'khovskii
V V Lavrishcheva
E S Shevchenko
I T Fediakina
V T Ivanova
N V Beliakova
E S Proshina
D D Abramov
S V Trushakova
L N Merkulova
R V Vartanian
L B Kisteneva
E I Samokhvalov
T A Oskerko
E L Feodoritova
É V Siluianova
E A Mukasheva
A L Beliaev
V E Malikov
N A Malyshev
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2012 Jan-Feb;57(1):20-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes
Adenoviridae - drug effects - physiology
Adenoviridae Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - virology
Adolescent
Adult
Antiviral Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Coinfection
Drug Resistance, Viral
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - drug effects - physiology
Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype - drug effects - physiology
Influenza B virus
Influenza, Human - drug therapy - epidemiology - virology
Oseltamivir - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Pandemics
Respirovirus - drug effects - physiology
Respirovirus Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - virology
Rimantadine - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Russia - epidemiology
Seasons
Abstract
The paper gives the results of monitoring the circulation of influenza viruses in the 2010-2011 season, that covers the second year of circulation of pandemic A(H1N1)v virus strains, and their interaction with seasonal A (H3N2) and B strains. Unlike the previous season, the beginning of an increase in morbidity was recorded in January 2011; its peak in the most of contiguous areas was noted at 5-7 weeks of 2011, with its further decline to threshold levels at week 11 of 2011. Preschool and school children were most involved in the epidemic process. Three influenza virus strains (A(H1N1)v, A(H3N2), and B) were found to circulate. Differences were found in the level of participation of the isolated strains in individual areas of the Russian Federation. Detailed typing of the isolated strains determined the compliance of the vast majority of them with vaccine viruses. The pandemic influenza A(H1N1)v virus strains retained their susceptibility to oseltamivir and were resistant to rimantadine. The participation of non-influenza acute respiratory viral infection pathogens was estimated as follows: 11.9% for parainfluenza viruses, 5.9% for adenoviruses, and 3.5% for PC viruses, and 0.7% for pneumonia Mycoplasma, which was comparable with the previous epidemic seasons.
PubMed ID
22624469 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.