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2204 records – page 1 of 221.

A 20-year ecological study of the temporal association between influenza and meningococcal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30400
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2004;19(2):181-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Elise Snitker Jensen
Søren Lundbye-Christensen
Susanne Samuelsson
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Henrik Carl Schønheyder
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Arhus, Denmark. esjensen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2004;19(2):181-7
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Infant
Influenza, Human - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Meningococcal Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Periodicity
Poisson Distribution
Prognosis
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Seasons
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Both influenza and meningococcal disease (MD) show seasonal variation with peak incidence rates during the winter. We examined whether fluctuations in occurrence of influenza were associated with changes in the incidence rate of MD, either simultaneously or with a delay of one or 2 weeks, and whether age had an impact on these associations. This ecological study was based on weekly surveillance data on influenza and a complete registration of MD cases (n = 413) in North Jutland County, Denmark, during 1980-1999. A total of 379 MD cases occurred during weeks with influenza registration. The analysis was done using a Poisson regression model taking into account the seasonal variation and trend over time in incidence rate of MD, and stratified by age: or = 14 years (n = 152). An increase of 100 registered cases of influenza per 100,000 inhabitants was associated with a 7% (95% CI: -1 to 15%) increase in the number of MD cases during the same week. The association was most marked for
PubMed ID
15074574 View in PubMed
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[44 cases of Hemophilus influenzae in the Laval University Hospital Center (1975-1979)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244381
Source
Union Med Can. 1981 Jul;110(7):611-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1981
Source
Nature. 2005 Oct 6;437(7060):794-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-6-2005
Source
Nature. 2005 Oct 6;437(7060):794-5
Date
Oct-6-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Biomedical Research - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Bioterrorism - prevention & control
Evolution, Molecular
Female
History, 20th Century
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history - prevention & control - virology
Orthomyxoviridae - genetics - pathogenicity
Publishing
Time Factors
Virulence - genetics
Virulence Factors
Notes
Comment In: Nature. 2006 Jan 19;439(7074):26616421546
Comment On: Nature. 2005 Oct 6;437(7060):889-9316208372
Erratum In: Nature. 2005 Oct 13;437(7061):940
PubMed ID
16208326 View in PubMed
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1918 Pandemic Influenza mortality in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297040
Source
Health Analytics and Vital Records, Division of Public Health, Department of Health and Social Services, State of Alaska.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2018
1 Health Analytics and Vital Records Division of Public Health Department of Health and Social Services HealthAnalytics@Alaska.gov Alaska Facts and Figures 1918 Pandemic Influenza Mortality in Alaska Background The 1918 Pandemic Influenza (“Spanish Flu” or flu) in Alaska developed later
  1 document  
Author
Health Analytics Unit of the Alaska Health Analytics and Vital Records Section
Source
Health Analytics and Vital Records, Division of Public Health, Department of Health and Social Services, State of Alaska.
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
350828
Keywords
Alaska
Pandemic influenza
Spanish flu
Mortality
Notes
Alaska Facts and Figures.
Documents

AK_1918Flu_DataBrief_092018.pdf

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1918 pandemic morbidity: The first wave hits the poor, the second wave hits the rich.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299653
Source
Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2018 05; 12(3):307-313
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
05-2018
Author
Svenn-Erik Mamelund
Author Affiliation
Work Research Institute, OsloMet-Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2018 05; 12(3):307-313
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Female
History, 20th Century
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Influenza Pandemic, 1918-1919 - economics - statistics & numerical data
Influenza, Human - epidemiology
Male
Morbidity
Norway - epidemiology
Pandemics - economics - statistics & numerical data
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Social Class
Vaccination
Abstract
Whether morbidity from the 1918-19 influenza pandemic discriminated by socioeconomic status has remained a subject of debate for 100 years. In lack of data to study this issue, the recent literature has hypothesized that morbidity was "socially neutral."
To study the associations between influenza-like illness (ILI) and socioeconomic status (SES), gender, and wave during the 1918-19 influenza pandemic.
Availability of incidence data on the 1918-19 pandemic is scarce, in particular for waves other than the "fall wave" October-December 1918. Here, an overlooked survey from Bergen, Norway (n = 10 633), is used to study differences in probabilities of ILI and ILI probability ratios by apartment size as a measure of SES and gender for 3 waves including the waves prior to and after the "fall wave."
Socioeconomic status was negatively associated with ILI in the first wave, but positively associated in the second wave. At all SES levels, men had the highest ILI in the summer, while women had the highest ILI in the fall. There were no SES or gender differences in ILI in the winter of 1919.
For the first time, it is documented a crossover in the role of socioeconomic status in 1918 pandemic morbidity. The poor came down with influenza first, while the rich with less exposure in the first wave had the highest morbidity in the second wave. The study suggests that the socioeconomically disadvantaged should be prioritized if vaccines are of limited availability in a future pandemic.
PubMed ID
29356350 View in PubMed
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1951 influenza epidemic, England and Wales, Canada, and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169257
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Apr;12(4):661-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Cécile Viboud
Theresa Tam
Douglas Fleming
Mark A Miller
Lone Simonsen
Author Affiliation
National Institutes of Health, Fogarty International Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. viboudc@mail.nih.gov
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Apr;12(4):661-8
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - history
England - epidemiology
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history
Middle Aged
Seasons
United States - epidemiology
Wales - epidemiology
Abstract
Influenza poses a continuing public health threat in epidemic and pandemic seasons. The 1951 influenza epidemic (A/H1N1) caused an unusually high death toll in England; in particular, weekly deaths in Liverpool even surpassed those of the 1918 pandemic. We further quantified the death rate of the 1951 epidemic in 3 countries. In England and Canada, we found that excess death rates from pneumonia and influenza and all causes were substantially higher for the 1951 epidemic than for the 1957 and 1968 pandemics (by > or =50%). The age-specific pattern of deaths in 1951 was consistent with that of other interpandemic seasons; no age shift to younger age groups, reminiscent of pandemics, occurred in the death rate. In contrast to England and Canada, the 1951 epidemic was not particularly severe in the United States. Why this epidemic was so severe in some areas but not others remains unknown and highlights major gaps in our understanding of interpandemic influenza.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16704816 View in PubMed
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1993-1994 influenza season: Canadian laboratory diagnoses, strain characterization and post-season serosurvey (Ontario).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217086
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1994 Oct 30;20(20):177-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1994
Author
J M Weber
Author Affiliation
National Laboratory for Special Pathogens, Bureau of Microbiology, LCDC, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1994 Oct 30;20(20):177-81
Date
Oct-30-1994
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Humans
Influenza A virus - classification
Influenza B virus - classification
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Laboratories
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Vaccination
Abstract
In Canada as a whole, influenza A/Beijing/32/92-like virus was the dominant infecting strain in the 1993-1994 season with reported laboratory diagnoses peaking in January 1994. Vaccination is again urged for all persons in high-risk groups. Antibody induced by vaccination does not persist well from season to season and the emerging A/Shangdong/9/93 (H3N2)-like variant is related to A/Beijing/32/92(H3N2) but is inhibited less by antibodies to that strain. Conditions are also consistent with possible increased influenza B activity this season.
PubMed ID
7812234 View in PubMed
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1994-1995 influenza season: Canadian laboratory diagnoses and strain characterization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214055
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1995 Oct 30;21(20):181-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1995
Author
J M Weber
Author Affiliation
National Laboratory for Special Pathogens, Bureau of Microbiology, LCDC, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1995 Oct 30;21(20):181-5
Date
Oct-30-1995
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Influenza A virus - isolation & purification
Influenza B virus - isolation & purification
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Influenza, Human - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Seasons
PubMed ID
8563690 View in PubMed
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1995-1996 influenza season: Canadian laboratory diagnoses and strain characterization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210561
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1996 Nov 15;22(22):185-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1996
Author
S. Zou
J. Weber
Author Affiliation
National Laboratory for Special Pathogens, Bureau of Microbiology, LCDC, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1996 Nov 15;22(22):185-8
Date
Nov-15-1996
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Humans
Influenza A virus - classification - isolation & purification
Influenza B virus - classification - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Sentinel Surveillance
PubMed ID
9086630 View in PubMed
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2204 records – page 1 of 221.