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34 records – page 1 of 4.

2007 Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Educational Needs Assessment Report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160713
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2007 Aug;21(8):519-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007

[A new system of specialized gastroenterological care to patients with inflammatory bowel diseases in St. Petersburg].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114067
Source
Ter Arkh. 2013;85(2):17-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
A Iu Baranovskii
É A Kondrashina
A M Segal'
Source
Ter Arkh. 2013;85(2):17-20
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colitis, Ulcerative - diagnosis - therapy
Crohn Disease - diagnosis - therapy
Early Diagnosis
Hospitals, Special - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - diagnosis - therapy
Russia
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Urban Health - standards
Abstract
To substantiate the effectiveness of the set-up center in the early detection of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and in its organization and implementation of current therapeutic programs.
The therapeutic activity of the specialized medical care system set up in St. Petersburg for patients with IBD (ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD)), which is based on a multifunctional inflammatory bowel disease center at City Clinical Hospital Thirty-One, was analyzed.
The effective work of the center could reduce time for verification of the diagnosis of UC from 6.4 +/- 1.4 to 3.6 +/- 0.8 months and CD from 28.6 +/- 6.7 to 15.3 +/- 4.2 months, respectively; decline the annual number of patients with moderate and severe UC from 73.4 to 53.6 and CD from 66.7 to 47%, and also set up a centralized system for all required types of current therapeutic and diagnostic care for these patients.
The establishment of the St. Petersburg Center for the diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases could develop and realize in practice a new closed-loop urban system for the early detection and notification of IBD patients, the organization and rendering of individual effective therapeutic-and-prophylactic care.
PubMed ID
23653933 View in PubMed
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The anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody assay in a province-wide practice: accurate in identifying cases of Crohn's disease and predicting inflammatory disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171577
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2005 Dec;19(12):717-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Brinderjit Kaila
Kenneth Orr
Charles N Bernstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg.
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2005 Dec;19(12):717-21
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic - analysis
Antibodies, Fungal - analysis
Antibody Specificity - immunology
Child
Crohn Disease - diagnosis - immunology
Diagnosis, Differential
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - diagnosis - immunology
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Saccharomyces cerevisiae - immunology
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
To determine the utility of the anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody (ASCA) ELISA test developed in Manitoba in 2001 in a population-wide sample referred from physicians across Manitoba in their investigation of patients with gastrointestinal symptoms.
Patients whose serum was referred for ASCA testing in 2001 and 2002 were eligible for the present study. ELISA was performed by a technologist, blind to patient diagnoses. A single investigator contacted physicians to facilitate chart review. Data collected included demographics, final diagnoses and tests used to substantiate the final diagnosis.
Of 482 subjects identified, 410 charts were available for review and 29 of those were unavailable for follow-up or had incomplete charts. The present study population included Crohn's disease (CD, n=114), ulcerative colitis (n=74), indeterminate colitis (n=31), celiac disease (n=9), irritable bowel syndrome (n=75), other diagnoses (n=33) and no disease (n=45). ASCA had a sensitivity of 37% (95% CI 27.8 to 46.8) and specificity of 97% (95% CI 93.8 to 98.6) for diagnosing CD and an odds ratio for a diagnosis of CD of 18.4 (95% CI 8.2 to 41.3). The 47 ASCA-positive patients included the following diagnoses: CD=39, ulcerative colitis=3, indeterminate colitis=1, celiac disease=3 and no disease=1. The likelihood of having an inflammatory disease if ASCA is positive was nearly 40-fold.
A positive ASCA test using this assay nearly clinches a diagnosis of some form of inflammatory intestinal disease, which is highly likely to be CD. In symptomatic patients, a positive ASCA test should encourage the clinician to pursue further investigations.
PubMed ID
16341311 View in PubMed
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Association between early childhood otitis media and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: an exploratory population-based analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119628
Source
J Pediatr. 2013 Mar;162(3):510-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Souradet Y Shaw
James F Blanchard
Charles N Bernstein
Author Affiliation
Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical and Research Centre, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr. 2013 Mar;162(3):510-4
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Child
Female
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Male
Otitis Media - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine whether a diagnosis of otitis media in the first 5 years of childhood is associated with the development of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
This was a nested case-control analysis of a population-based IBD database in Manitoba, Canada. A total of 294 children with IBD diagnosed between 1989 and 2008 were matched to 2377 controls, based on age, sex, and geographic region. The diagnosis of ottis media was based on physician claims. IBD status was determined based on a validated administrative database definition. Multivariate conditional logistic regression models were used to model the association between otitis media and IBD, adjusted for annual physician visits.
Approximately 5% of the IBD cases and 12% of the controls did not have an otitis media diagnosis before that IBD case date. By age 5 years, 89% of the IBD cases had at least one diagnosis of otitis media, compared with 82% of the controls. In multivariate analyses, compared with cases and controls without an otitis media diagnosis, individuals with an otitis media diagnosis by age 5 years were 2.8-fold more likely to be an IBD case (95% CI, 1.5-5.2; P = .001). This association was detected in stratified models examining Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis separately.
Compared with controls, subjects diagnosed with IBD were more likely to have had at least one early childhood episode of otitis media before their diagnosis. We suspect that otitis media serves as a proxy measure of antibiotic use.
PubMed ID
23084703 View in PubMed
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The burden of large and small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis in adults and children: a population-based analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165042
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2007 May;102(5):1042-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Gilaad G Kaplan
Kevin B Laupland
Decker Butzner
Stefan J Urbanski
Samuel S Lee
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2007 May;102(5):1042-9
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Child
Cholangiopancreatography, Magnetic Resonance
Cholangitis, Sclerosing - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Hepatitis, Autoimmune - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The epidemiology of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) has been incompletely assessed by population-based studies. We therefore conducted a population-based study to determine: (a) incidence rates of large and small duct PSC in adults and children, (b) the risk of inflammatory bowel disease on developing PSC, and (c) patterns of clinical presentation with the advent of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP).
All residents of the Calgary Health Region diagnosed with PSC between 2000 and 2005 were identified by medical records, endoscopic, diagnostic imaging, and pathology databases. Demographic and clinical information were obtained. Incidence rates were determined and risks associated with PSC were reported as rate ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).
Forty-nine PSC patients were identified for an age- and gender-adjusted annual incidence rate of 0.92 cases per 100,000 person-years. The incidence of small duct PSC was 0.15/100,000. In children the incidence rate was 0.23/100,000 compared with 1.11/100,000 in adults. PSC risk was similar in Crohn's disease (CD; RR 220.0, 95% CI 132.4-343.7) and ulcerative colitis (UC; RR 212.4, 95% CI 116.1-356.5). Autoimmune hepatitis overlap was noted in 10% of cases. MRCP diagnosed large duct PSC in one-third of cases. Delay in diagnosis was common (median 8.4 months). A minority had complications at diagnosis: cholangitis (6.1%), pancreatitis (4.1%), and cirrhosis (4.1%).
Pediatric cases and small duct PSC are less common than adult large duct PSC. Surprisingly, the risk of developing PSC in UC and CD was similar. Autoimmune hepatitis overlap was noted in a significant minority of cases.
PubMed ID
17313496 View in PubMed
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Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2007 Oct;(106):1-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
K. Tran
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2007 Oct;(106):1-4
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Capsule Endoscopes - contraindications
Capsule Endoscopy - adverse effects - contraindications - methods
Colon - pathology
Colonoscopy - methods
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis
Device Approval
Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal - economics - methods
Equipment Design
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - diagnosis
Intestinal Diseases - diagnosis
Intestinal Neoplasms - diagnosis
Intestinal Polyps - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Occult Blood
Sensitivity and specificity
Telemetry - instrumentation
Time Factors
Video Recording - economics - instrumentation
Abstract
(1) The PillCam Colon capsule is an ingestible miniature camera that captures images of the colon's inner lining. (2) There is limited evidence on the use of this technology in imaging the colon. Two small, methodologically flawed pilot studies found that for patients with positive findings (i.e., abnormalities detected), the rates of detection with the PillCam Colon capsule were similar to those obtained with conventional colonoscopy. (3) No serious adverse events were reported in the pilot studies, although some patients had delayed excretion of the capsule. (4) A challenge for clinicians using this technology will be the time required to read the large quantity of video images produced. Further enhancements to the software system used to view the images may address this issue.
PubMed ID
17957839 View in PubMed
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Celiac disease, collagenous sprue and microscopic colitis in IBD. Observations from a population-based cohort of IBD (ICURE).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272770
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2015;50(10):1234-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Anders Rönnblom
Tommy Holmström
Hans Tanghöj
Alkwin Wanders
Daniel Sjöberg
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2015;50(10):1234-40
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Celiac Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Colitis, Microscopic - diagnosis - epidemiology
Collagenous Sprue - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Incidence
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), microscopic colitis and celiac disease are all diseases with worldwide distribution and increased incidence has been reported from many areas. There is a shortage of studies investigating the occurrence of these diseases in the same individual and whether those affected demonstrate any particular phenotype. The aim of the study was to describe the concomitant incidence of microscopic colitis and celiac disease in a population-based IBD cohort.
All 790 individuals in a prospective population-based cohort included 2005-09 from Uppsala region, Sweden, were reviewed regarding the appearance of microscopic or celiac disease before or after IBD diagnosis.
Fifty percent (396/790) of the patients had been examined for the possibility of celiac disease. Seventeen patients with celiac disease were found, representing 2.2% of the cohort. Patients with celiac disease were younger compared to the non-celiac patients and those with colitis had more often an extensive inflammation of the colon. Seventy-one percent (12/17) were women. The majority of the patients were diagnosed with celiac disease before IBD. Five patients with IBD had an earlier diagnosis of microscopic colitis or developed it after the IBD diagnosis. One teenager developed collagenous sprue, misinterpreted as a severe relapse of ulcerative colitis (UC) resulting in colectomy.
The risk for celiac disease seems not to be increased in IBD, but those affected by both diseases seem to be predominantly women with extensive UC. There is a potential association between microscopic colitis and IBD.
PubMed ID
25921772 View in PubMed
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Change of diagnosis during the first five years after onset of inflammatory bowel disease: results of a prospective follow-up study (the IBSEN Study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80915
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2006 Sep;41(9):1037-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Henriksen Magne
Jahnsen Jørgen
Lygren Idar
Sauar Jostein
Schulz Tom
Stray Njål
Vatn Morten H
Moum Bjørn
Ibsen Study Group
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Østfold Hospital, Moss, Norway. maghen@online.no
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2006 Sep;41(9):1037-43
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Colitis, Ulcerative - diagnosis - epidemiology
Crohn Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diagnosis, Differential
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: An exact diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and further subclassification may be difficult even after clinical, radiological and histological examinations. A correct subclassification is important for the success of both medical and surgical therapeutic strategies, but there is a dearth of information available on the frequency of changes in diagnosis in population-based studies. The objective of this work was prospectively to re-evaluate the diagnosis in an unselected cohort of IBD patients during the first five years after the initial diagnosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients classified as IBD or possible IBD in the period 1990-94 (the IBSEN cohort) had their diagnosis re-evaluated after 1 and 5 years. Initially, the patients were classified as ulcerative colitis (UC), Crohn's disease (CD), indeterminate colitis (IC) or possible IBD. At the 5-year visit, patients were classified as UC, CD or non-IBD. RESULTS: A total of 843 patients (518 UC, 221 CD, 40 IC and 64 possible IBD) were identified. Clinical information was available for 94% of the patients who survived after 5 years. A change in diagnosis was found in 9% of the patients initially classified as UC or CD. A change to non-IBD was more frequent than a change between UC and CD. A large proportion of patients initially classified as IC or possible IBD were diagnosed as non-IBD after 5 years (22.5% versus 50%). When IBD was confirmed in these groups, UC was more frequent than CD. Two changes in diagnosis during follow-up were observed in 2.8% of the patients; this was more frequent in patients initially classified as IC or possible IBD. CONCLUSIONS: There are obvious diagnostic problems in a minority of patients with IBD; a systematic follow-up is therefore important in these patients.
PubMed ID
16938716 View in PubMed
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Chronic inflammatory bowel disease in children and adolescents in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37014
Source
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1991 Oct;13(3):293-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1991
Author
H. Hildebrand
B. Fredrikzon
L. Holmquist
B. Kristiansson
B. Lindquist
Source
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1991 Oct;13(3):293-7
Date
Oct-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Colitis, Ulcerative - epidemiology
Crohn Disease - epidemiology
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Incidence
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The incidence and prevalence of chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children was established during 1984 and 1985 in a prospective study in Sweden. The patients with IBD were classified as having ulcerative colitis (UC), Crohn's disease (CD), probable Crohn's disease (PCD), and indeterminate colitis (IC) according to defined histopathologic, endoscopic, and radiologic criteria. The study covered 1.51 million children less than 16 years of age (93% of all children in Sweden). The incidence of IBD was 5.0 and 4.5 and the prevalence was 17.6 and 18.2 per 100,000 children during the 2 years, respectively. The mean prevalence of UC was 7.5 per 100,000 and of CD + PCD was 6.2 per 100,000. The prevalence of IC was 4.2 per 100,000, which corresponds to 23% of the children with IBD.
PubMed ID
1791507 View in PubMed
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Complementary and alternative medicine use by patients with inflammatory bowel disease: An Internet survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201861
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 1999 May;13(4):327-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
R J Hilsden
J B Meddings
M J Verhoef
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. rhilsden@acs.ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 1999 May;13(4):327-32
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Complementary Therapies - methods - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Patient satisfaction
Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To determine the degree and determinants of the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with the use of the Internet and to compare the results with those found by using a similar survey in patients attending gastroenterology clinics in Calgary, Alberta.
A cross-sectional survey of 263 patients with IBD with the use of a World Wide Web-based, structured questionnaire was conducted.
Complementary therapies had been used by 46% of patients in the previous two years. Current use was reported by 34%. Vitamins, herbal products and natural health practices were the most commonly reported therapies. Side effects and lack of effectiveness of standard therapies were the most commonly cited reasons for seeking complementary medicine. However, despite this, respondents who had previously received surgery, or intravenous or oral steroids were less likely to be current CAM users. Important differences between the determinants of and reasons for CAM use in the present study and those of a similar study of IBD patients in a local tertiary care setting were noted.
Complementary medicine use is common in patients with IBD. Differences in the determinants of and reasons for CAM use noted between the present Internet sample and a gastroenterology clinic sample suggest that conclusions from the present study and from previous studies based only on clinic samples provide a limited view of CAM use by people with IBD. More comprehensive assessments are needed.
PubMed ID
10360993 View in PubMed
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34 records – page 1 of 4.