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343 records – page 1 of 35.

The 3rd S-ECCO IBD Masterclass, Copenhagen, February 19-20, 2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262764
Source
Tech Coloproctol. 2014 Aug;18(8):769-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
O. Zmora
Source
Tech Coloproctol. 2014 Aug;18(8):769-70
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Congresses as topic
Denmark
Disease Management
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - therapy
PubMed ID
24962494 View in PubMed
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A 10-year survey of inflammatory bowel diseases-drug therapy, costs and adverse reactions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71979
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2001 Apr;15(4):475-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
P. Blomqvist
N. Feltelius
R. Löfberg
A. Ekbom
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Paul.Blomqvist@mep.ki.se
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2001 Apr;15(4):475-81
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - adverse effects - economics - therapeutic use
Drug Costs - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - drug therapy - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Support
Physician's Practice Patterns
Prescriptions, Drug - economics
Retrospective Studies
Steroids
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Drug therapy for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis is based on anti-inflammatory and immunodulating drugs, nutritional support and surgical resection. Recently, new drugs have been introduced. AIM: To report drug prescriptions, costs and adverse reactions among inflammatory bowel disease patients in Sweden between 1988 and 1997. METHODS: Drug use was calculated from the national Diagnosis and therapy survey and drug costs from prescriptions and drug sales. Adverse drug reactions were obtained from the Medical Products Agency's National Pharmacovigilance system. RESULTS: The annual drug exposure for Crohn's disease was 0.55 million daily doses per million population, mainly supplementation and aminosalicylic acids. Mesalazine and olsalazine had 61% within this group. For ulcerative colitis patients, drug exposure was 0.61 million daily doses per million per year and aminosalicylic acids fell from 70% to 65%. For inflammatory bowel disease patients, corticosteroids and nutritional supplementation were common. The annual average cost for inflammatory bowel disease drugs was 7.0 million US dollars. Annually, 32 adverse drug reactions were reported, mainly haematological reactions such as agranulocytosis and pancytopenia (60%), followed by skin reactions. Only two deaths were reported. Aminosalicylic acids were the most commonly reported compounds. CONCLUSIONS: Drug use for inflammatory bowel disease in the pre-biologic agent era rested on aminosalicylic acid drugs and corticosteroids with stable levels, proportions and costs. The level of adverse drug reactions was low but haematological reactions support the monitoring of inflammatory bowel disease patients.
PubMed ID
11284775 View in PubMed
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2007 Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Educational Needs Assessment Report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160713
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2007 Aug;21(8):519-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007

Acid-suppressing drugs and gastroesophageal reflux disease as risk factors for acute pancreatitis--results from a Swedish Case-Control Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172609
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Mar;15(3):141-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Anders Sundström
Kerstin Blomgren
Lars Alfredsson
Bengt-Erik Wiholm
Author Affiliation
Medical Products Agency, Uppsala, Sweden. Anders.Sundstrom@Mpa.se
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Mar;15(3):141-9
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antacids - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Enzyme Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Gastroesophageal Reflux - complications - drug therapy
Histamine H2 Antagonists - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - complications - drug therapy
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatitis - epidemiology - etiology
Pharmacoepidemiology
Proton Pump Inhibitors
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To study risk factors for acute pancreatitis, here with emphasis on gastro-intestinal diseases and their treatments.
Population based case-control study covering four areas in Sweden encompassing 2.2 million inhabitants. Included were 462 incident cases of acute pancreatitis aged 20-85 years, hospitalized from 1 January 1995-31 May 1998, and 1,781 unmatched controls randomly selected from the study base using a population register. Information was captured from medical records and structured telephone interviews.
Current use of H(2) antagonists starting within 6 months of index-date was associated with acute pancreatitis with an adjusted OR of 4.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-15), and current use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) with an adjusted OR of 3.2 (95%CI 1.4-7.4). For both drug classes, the ORs tended to be higher at higher doses. Gastritis/gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) within the last 12 months not treated with PPIs or H(2)-antagonists and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) not treated with anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive drugs were associated with development of acute pancreatitis with adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 1.9 (95%CI 1.2-3.0) and 5.1 (95%CI 2.0-13) respectively.
Current IBD without treatment and gastritis/GERD without treatment were found to be associated with increased risks to develop acute pancreatitis but the nature of the latter association needs to be further evaluated. On balance, we judge that the observed associations between current use of H(2)-antagonists and PPIs and increased risk of acute pancreatitis are unlikely to be explained by bias.
PubMed ID
16200654 View in PubMed
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Active cytomegalovirus infection diagnosed by real-time PCR in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a prospective, controlled observational study (.).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285270
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2016 Sep;51(9):1075-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Mari Thörn
Fredrik Rorsman
Anders Rönnblom
Per Sangfelt
Alkwin Wanders
Britt-Marie Eriksson
Kåre Bondeson
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2016 Sep;51(9):1075-80
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cytomegalovirus
Cytomegalovirus Infections - diagnosis
DNA, Viral - analysis
Feces - virology
Female
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Immunosuppression - adverse effects
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - complications - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
It is assumed that cytomegaloviral (CMV) infection in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is caused by reactivation due to the immunosuppressive therapy, but the role of CMV as a pathophysiological factor and prognostic marker in IBD is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate CMV infection in IBD, with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry, with emphasis on newly diagnosed disease.
In this prospective, controlled study, 67 patients with IBD and 34 control patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or rectal bleeding were included. Serology for CMV was analysed along with CMV DNA in plasma, mucosal biopsies, and faeces. Mucosal biopsies were further analysed with histopathology and CMV immunohistochemistry.
Detection of CMV IgM was more common in patients with IBD, compared to controls, 21% versus 3%. CMV DNA was found in 16% of patients with newly diagnosed, untreated IBD and in 38% of steroid-treated patients. Four of the five patients that needed urgent surgery were CMV-DNA positive in at least one of three sample types. None of the controls had detectable CMV DNA.
Active CMV infection was found in high proportions of newly diagnosed untreated patients with IBD, in patients on immunosuppression and in patients in the need of surgery. Low CMV-DNA levels in non-immunosuppressed patients were not a risk factor for the development of more severe IBD, while the detection of CMV DNA in patients on immunosuppressive therapy may foresee disease progression.
PubMed ID
27142339 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2016 Nov;51(11):1326-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Palle Bager
Mette Julsgaard
Thea Vestergaard
Lisbet Ambrosius Christensen
Jens Frederik Dahlerup
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2016 Nov;51(11):1326-31
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - classification - therapeutic use
Decision Making
Denmark
Female
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - drug therapy
Logistic Models
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Patient satisfaction
Quality of Health Care - standards
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Tertiary Care Centers
Young Adult
Abstract
In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), adherence to both medical treatment and other aspects of care has a substantial impact on the course of the disease. Most studies of medical adherence have reported that 30-45% of patients with IBD were non-adherent. Our study aimed to investigate the different aspects of adherence and to identify predictors of non-adherence, including the quality of care, for outpatients with IBD.
An anonymous electronic questionnaire was used to investigate different aspects of adherence, the quality of care, patient involvement and shared decision making among 377 IBD outpatients.
Three hundred (80%) filled in the questionnaire. The overall adherence rate was 93%. Young age (
PubMed ID
27311071 View in PubMed
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Adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease feel ambivalent towards their parents' concern for them.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87529
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Dec;21(4):476-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Reichenberg Kjell
Lindfred Helene
Saalman Robert
Author Affiliation
The Nordic School of Public Health and The Vårdal Institute, Lund and Göteborg Universities, Göteborg, Sweden. kjell@reichenberg.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Dec;21(4):476-81
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Anxiety - etiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Communication
Conflict (Psychology)
Cooperative Behavior
Fear - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - complications - prevention & control - psychology
Male
Models, Psychological
Nursing Methodology Research
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Patient Education as Topic
Self Care - psychology
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Sweden
Trust
Abstract
This is a grounded theory study to identify concepts for describing how adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) respond to their parents' concern for them. Ten adolescent boys and seven girls were interviewed. In the analysis four main categories emerged: ambivalence, ability/inability, compliance/resistance and trust/distrust. We found ambivalence to be the most distinctive theme to appear in the way in which these young people described how they felt about their parents' response to their disease. The core category ambivalence was expressed as an oscillation between seeking close contact with one's parents or, sometimes, staving them off, one moment feeling anxiously dependent upon them or turning to them for protection and support and the next, trying to achieve a dialogue with them. The core category comprised three subcategories, ability/inability, compliance/resistance and trust/distrust. The clinical support for young individuals with IBD should include an awareness of the simultaneous existence of conflicting attitudes, reactions and emotions.
PubMed ID
18036010 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adult height in patients with childhood-onset inflammatory bowel disease: a nationwide population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306686
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2020 04; 51(8):789-800
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2020
Author
Natalia Mouratidou
Petter Malmborg
Michael C Sachs
Johan Askling
Anders Ekbom
Martin Neovius
Karin E Smedby
Lars Sävendahl
Jonas F Ludvigsson
Ola Olén
Author Affiliation
Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2020 04; 51(8):789-800
Date
04-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Body Height
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child Development - physiology
Cohort Studies
Colitis, Ulcerative - epidemiology
Crohn Disease - epidemiology
Female
Growth Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Male
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Growth retardation is well described in childhood-onset inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
To study if childhood-onset IBD is associated with reduced final adult height.
We identified 4201 individuals diagnosed with childhood-onset IBD 1990-2014 (Crohn's disease: n = 1640; ulcerative colitis: n = 2201 and IBD-unclassified = 360) in the Swedish National Patient Register.
Patients with IBD attained a lower adult height compared to reference individuals (adjusted mean height difference [AMHD] -0.9 cm [95% CI -1.1 to -0.7]) and to their healthy siblings (AMHD -0.8 cm [-1.0 to -0.6]). Patients with Crohn's disease (CD) were slightly shorter than patients with ulcerative colitis (UC; -1.3 cm vs -0.6 cm). Lower adult height was more often seen in patients with pre-pubertal disease onset (AMHD -1.6 cm [-2.0 to -1.2]), and in patients with a more severe disease course (AMHD -1.9 cm, [-2.4 to -1.4]). Some 5.0% of CD and 4.3% of UC patients were classified as growth retarded vs 2.5% of matched reference individuals (OR 2.42 [95% CI 1.85-3.17] and 1.74 [1.36-2.22] respectively).
Patients with childhood-onset IBD on average attain a slightly lower adult height than their healthy peers. Adult height was more reduced in patients with pre-pubertal onset of disease and in those with a more severe disease course.
Notes
CommentIn: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2020 Aug;52(3):563-564 PMID 32656831
CommentIn: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2020 Aug;52(3):560-561 PMID 32656832
CommentIn: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2020 Aug;52(3):559-560 PMID 32656841
PubMed ID
32133656 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alterations in intestinal microbial flora and human disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160104
Source
Curr Opin Gastroenterol. 2008 Jan;24(1):11-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Mohamed Othman
Roberto Agüero
Henry C Lin
Author Affiliation
Gastroenterology Section, New Mexico VA Healthcare System, Albuquerque, NM 87108, USA.
Source
Curr Opin Gastroenterol. 2008 Jan;24(1):11-6
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Animals
Bacterial Physiological Phenomena
Bacterial Translocation
Burns - microbiology
Digestive System Diseases - microbiology
Fibromyalgia - microbiology
Gastroenteritis - microbiology
Gastrointestinal Motility - physiology
Hepatic Encephalopathy - microbiology
Host-Pathogen Interactions
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - microbiology
Intestine, Small - microbiology
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - microbiology
Metagenome - physiology
Pancreatitis - microbiology
Abstract
To highlight the evidence supporting the role of altered commensal gut flora in human disease. While the contribution of the indigenous gut microbial community is widely recognized, only recently has there been evidence pointing to indigenous flora in disease.
This review discusses recent evidence pointing to the role of altered commensal gut flora in such common conditions as irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. Recent studies document the intricate relationship between the vast population of microbes that live in our gut and the human host. Since increased intestinal permeability and immune activation are consequences of an altered host-gut microbial relationship, what are the clinical effects of this shift in relationship?
We focus on the example of an abnormal expansion of gut microbial flora into the small bowel or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and discuss the effects of bacterial overgrowth on the human host in acute pancreatitis, bacterial gastroenteritis, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, hepatic encephalopathy, and fibromyalgia and burn injury. The identification of the underlying role of altered commensal gut microbiota in these and other human diseases could lead to novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies that would improve clinical outcome.
PubMed ID
18043226 View in PubMed
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343 records – page 1 of 35.