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29 records – page 1 of 3.

Anemia, nutritional status, and inflammation in hospitalized elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92557
Source
Nutrition. 2008 Nov-Dec;24(11-12):1116-22
Publication Type
Article

Antioxidant intake, oxidative stress and inflammation among immigrant women from the Middle East living in Sweden: associations with cardiovascular risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84865
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2007 Dec;17(10):748-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Daryani Achraf
Basu Samar
Becker Wulf
Larsson Anders
Risérus Ulf
Author Affiliation
Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala Science Park, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. achraf.daryani@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2007 Dec;17(10):748-56
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Blood Pressure - physiology
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Emigration and Immigration
F2-Isoprostanes - blood
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology
Iran - ethnology
Middle Aged
Oxidative Stress
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Immigrant women from the Middle East have higher cardiovascular risk compared to native women. Whether low antioxidant intake, oxidative stress or inflammation contributes to risk is unknown. In a cross-sectional study of 157 randomly selected foreign-born women (Iranian and Turkish) and native women living in Sweden, we investigated antioxidant status, oxidative stress (F(2)-isoprostanes) and systemic inflammation (plasma high sensitive C-reactive protein; CRP) markers. We also investigated relationships between F(2)-isoprostanes, CRP and cardiovascular risk factors. METHODS AND RESULT: Dietary intake was assessed using 24-h dietary recalls repeated four times. Micronutrient intake was not consistently different between groups. Serum alpha-tocopherol, but not gamma-tocopherol levels, was lower in Turkish vs. Swedish women (P0.21, P values
PubMed ID
17145175 View in PubMed
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The Association Between Low Grade Systemic Inflammation and Skin Diseases: A Cross-sectional Survey in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289454
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2018 Jan 12; 98(1):65-69
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-12-2018
Author
Suvi-Päivikki Sinikumpu
Laura Huilaja
Juha Auvinen
Jari Jokelainen
Katri Puukka
Aimo Ruokonen
Markku Timonen
Kaisa Tasanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Medical Research Center, PEDEGO Research Group, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, FIN-90029 OYS Oulu, Finland. suvi-paivikki.sinikumpu@oulu.fi.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2018 Jan 12; 98(1):65-69
Date
Jan-12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Onychomycosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Rosacea - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Skin Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
Low grade inflammation is associated with many noncommunicable diseases. The association between skin diseases in general and systemic inflammation has not previously been studied at the population level. A whole-body investigation on 1,930 adults belonging to Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 was performed and high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) level was measured as a marker of low grade inflammation in order to determine the association between low grade inflammation and skin diseases in an unselected adult population. After adjustment for confounding factors the following skin disorders were associated with low grade inflammation in multinomial logistic regression analysis: atopic eczema (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-3.9), onychomycosis (OR 2.0, 1.2-3.2) and rosacea (OR 1.7, 1.1-2.5). After additionally adjusting for body mass index and systemic diseases, the risks for atopic eczema (OR 2.4, 1.3-4.6) and onychomycosis (OR 1.9, 1.1-3.1) remained statistically significant. In conclusion, low grade inflammation is present in several skin diseases.
PubMed ID
28902946 View in PubMed
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The Association Between Low Grade Systemic Inflammation and Skin Diseases: A Cross-sectional Survey in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289612
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2018 Jan 12; 98(1):65-69
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-12-2018
Author
Suvi-Päivikki Sinikumpu
Laura Huilaja
Juha Auvinen
Jari Jokelainen
Katri Puukka
Aimo Ruokonen
Markku Timonen
Kaisa Tasanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Medical Research Center, PEDEGO Research Group, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, FIN-90029 OYS Oulu, Finland. suvi-paivikki.sinikumpu@oulu.fi.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2018 Jan 12; 98(1):65-69
Date
Jan-12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Onychomycosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Rosacea - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Skin Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
Low grade inflammation is associated with many noncommunicable diseases. The association between skin diseases in general and systemic inflammation has not previously been studied at the population level. A whole-body investigation on 1,930 adults belonging to Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 was performed and high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) level was measured as a marker of low grade inflammation in order to determine the association between low grade inflammation and skin diseases in an unselected adult population. After adjustment for confounding factors the following skin disorders were associated with low grade inflammation in multinomial logistic regression analysis: atopic eczema (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-3.9), onychomycosis (OR 2.0, 1.2-3.2) and rosacea (OR 1.7, 1.1-2.5). After additionally adjusting for body mass index and systemic diseases, the risks for atopic eczema (OR 2.4, 1.3-4.6) and onychomycosis (OR 1.9, 1.1-3.1) remained statistically significant. In conclusion, low grade inflammation is present in several skin diseases.
PubMed ID
28902946 View in PubMed
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Association of red blood cell n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids with plasma inflammatory biomarkers among the Quebec Cree population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262751
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Sep;68(9):1042-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
M-È Labonté
E. Dewailly
M. Lucas
P. Couture
B. Lamarche
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Sep;68(9):1042-7
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Docosahexaenoic Acids - blood
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - blood
Erythrocytes - metabolism
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - blood
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - blood
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology
Interleukin-6 - blood
Male
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - blood
Abstract
We examined the prevalence of elevated plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations and associations with red blood cell (RBC) long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFA) in the James Bay Cree population from the province of Quebec (Canada).
A total of 744 Cree adults (18-91 years) from seven communities of Eastern James Bay were included in these cross-sectional analyses. Associations between RBC LCn-3PUFA and proinflammatory markers (hs-CRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a)) were assessed by using multivariate general linear models with adjustment for sex, age and waist circumference. An arbitrary inflammation score was defined based on the sum of the quartiles of hs-CRP, IL-6 and TNF-a concentrations (range=3-12).
Elevated hs-CRP concentrations (>3?mg/l) were present in 46.9% (95% confidence interval (CI) 43.3-50.5) of the James Bay Cree population. RBC docosapentaenoic acid (DPAn-3; C22:5n-3) was inversely associated with hs-CRP, TNF-a and the inflammation score (all P trend0.18). Among participants with RBC DPAn-3 levels above the median of the population, odds ratio of having an elevated inflammation score (=9) was 0.67 (95% CI, 0.48-0.93) compared with participants below the median.
RESULTS indicate that low-grade systemic inflammation is highly prevalent and that higher RBC DPAn-3 levels are associated with a lower risk of systemic inflammation in the James Bay Cree population.
PubMed ID
25028086 View in PubMed
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Calcium supplementation and inflammation increase mortality in rheumatoid arthritis: A 15-year cohort study in 609 patients from the Oslo Rheumatoid Arthritis Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287051
Source
Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2017 Feb;46(4):411-417
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Sella A Provan
Inge C Olsen
Cathrine Austad
Glenn Haugeberg
Tore K Kvien
Till Uhlig
Source
Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2017 Feb;46(4):411-417
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology
Atherosclerosis - mortality
Blood Sedimentation
Bone Density
Calcium, Dietary - therapeutic use
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology
Information Storage and Retrieval
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - diagnostic imaging - drug therapy - epidemiology
Propensity Score
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
To investigate whether osteoporosis or use of calcium supplementations predict all-cause mortality, or death from CVD, in a longitudinal cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
Patients in the Oslo RA register (ORAR) were examined, and bone mineral density was measured in 1996. The cohort was linked to the Norwegian Cause of Death registry on December 31, 2010. Death from CVD was defined in 3 following different outcomes: (1) primary atherosclerotic death, (2) atherosclerotic death as one of the 5 listed causes of death, and (3) CVD according to World Health Organization (WHO) definition as primary cause of death. Baseline predictors of all-cause mortality and death from CVD were identified in separate Cox regression models, using backwards selection. Sensitivity analyses were performed including analyses of interactions and competing risk.
A total of 609 patients were examined in 1996/1997. By December 31, 2010, 162 patients (27%) had died, resulting in 7439 observed patient-years. Of the deceased, 40 (24.7%) had primary atherosclerotic death. In the final model of all-cause mortality increased baseline ESR [hazard ratio (HR) 1.02 per mm/h, 95% CI: 1.01-1.03], calcium supplementation (1.74, 1.07-2.84), and osteoporosis, defined as a T score =2.5 SD at any location, (1.58, 1.07-2.32) predicted higher mortality rates, in models adjusted for age, gender, and a propensity score. In the final model of primary atherosclerotic death, increased ESR (1.03 per mm/h, 1.01-1.05) and calcium supplementation (3.39, 1.41-8.08), predicted higher mortality.
Increased baseline ESR and use of calcium supplementation were predictors of increased all-cause mortality and risk of death from CVD in this longitudinal study of patients with RA.
PubMed ID
27522465 View in PubMed
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Changes in pre-diagnostic serum C-reactive protein concentrations and ovarian cancer risk: a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137348
Source
Ann Oncol. 2011 Aug;22(8):1916-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
A T Toriola
K. Grankvist
C B Agborsangaya
A. Lukanova
M. Lehtinen
H M Surcel
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Oulu, Finland. Adetunji.toriola@uta.fi
Source
Ann Oncol. 2011 Aug;22(8):1916-21
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Biological Specimen Banks
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Case-Control Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology
Longitudinal Studies
Odds Ratio
Ovarian Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology
Risk factors
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Evidence suggests that inflammation may be associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer but there is paucity of studies investigating this association, especially using over-time changes in inflammatory biomarkers.
We conducted a prospective population-based case-control study nested within the Finnish Maternity Cohort (FMC). Within the FMC, 170 women with ovarian cancer who had donated serum samples to the cohort twice, =1 year apart, before cancer diagnoses were identified. One control per case was matched for age, parity and sampling date.
Comparing the highest with lowest tertiles, the odds ratio (OR) of ovarian cancer using the first set of serum samples (mean lag time to cancer diagnosis 9.0 years) was 1.62 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93-2.83]. However, analysis conducted using the second set of serum samples donated closer to cancer diagnosis (mean lag time 6.4 years) revealed a significantly increased risk of ovarian cancer comparing extreme tertiles of C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations; OR 1.96 (95% CI 1.11-3.4). Over time, increases in individuals' CRP concentrations were also associated with increased risk; OR 1.90 (95% CI 1.12-3.23).
The results suggest that inflammation may precede ovarian cancer since increasing CRP concentrations, both across tertiles and longitudinally at the individual level, were associated with increased risk.
PubMed ID
21292643 View in PubMed
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Chronic inflammation induced by organic dust and related metabolic cardiovascular disease risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176725
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2004 Dec;30(6):438-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Yvon Cormier
Evelyne Israël-Assayag
Author Affiliation
Centre de pneumologie, Institut de cardiologie et de pneumologie Hôpital Laval, Ste Foy, Québec, Canada. yvon.cormier@med.ulaval.ca
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2004 Dec;30(6):438-44
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Biological Markers
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - immunology
Case-Control Studies
Cell Adhesion Molecules - blood
Chronic Disease
Dust
Humans
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Interleukin-6 - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Quebec - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Swine
Abstract
Chronic inflammation is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Exposure to organic dust induces an inflammatory response. This study was done to verify whether inflammation caused by exposure to organic dust increases the metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular diseases.
Thirty-six nonsmoking men who worked in a swine confinement building and 35 unexposed matched controls were studied. Each person was evaluated for inflammatory markers, including white blood cell counts, cell-bound (CD11b, CD18, CD31, CD62L) and circulating soluble adhesion molecule levels (sICAM-1, sPECAM-1, sL, sE, and sP selectins), serum CRP (C-reactive protein), fibrinogen, and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Cardiovascular risk factors [the serum lipid profile, apoprotein B (Apo B)] and insulin levels were also assessed.
The groups were similar with respect to age, physical characteristics, and blood cell counts. The expression of adhesion molecules (P-values
PubMed ID
15633594 View in PubMed
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Clustering of depression and inflammation in adolescents previously exposed to childhood adversity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125305
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2012 Jul 1;72(1):34-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2012
Author
Gregory E Miller
Steve W Cole
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. gemiller@psych.ubc.ca
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2012 Jul 1;72(1):34-40
Date
Jul-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
C-Reactive Protein
Canada - epidemiology
Cluster analysis
Depressive Disorder - blood - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology
Interleukin-6 - blood
Interview, Psychological - methods
Life Change Events
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
There is mounting interest in the hypothesis that inflammation contributes to the pathogenesis of depression and underlies depressed patients' vulnerability to comorbid medical conditions. However, research on depression and inflammation has yielded conflicting findings, fostering speculation that these conditions associate only in certain subgroups, such as patients exposed to childhood adversity.
We studied 147 female adolescents. All were in good health at baseline but at high risk for depression because of family history or cognitive vulnerability. Subjects were assessed every 6 months for 2.5 years, undergoing diagnostic interviews and venipuncture for measurement of two inflammatory biomarkers, C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Childhood adversity was indexed by parental separation, low socioeconomic status, and familial psychopathology.
Multilevel models indicated that childhood adversity promotes clustering of depression and inflammation. Among subjects exposed to high childhood adversity, the transition to depression was accompanied by increases in both CRP and IL-6. Higher CRP remained evident 6 months later, even after depressive symptoms had abated. These lingering effects were bidirectional, such that among subjects with childhood adversity, high IL-6 forecasted depression 6 months later, even after concurrent inflammation was considered. This coupling of depression and inflammation was not apparent in subjects without childhood adversity.
These findings suggest that childhood adversity promotes the formation of a neuroimmune pipeline in which inflammatory signaling between the brain and periphery is amplified. Once established, this pipeline leads to a coupling of depression and inflammation, which may contribute to later affective difficulties and biomedical complications.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22494534 View in PubMed
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C-Reactive protein in adults with chronic spinal cord injury: increased chronic inflammation in tetraplegia vs paraplegia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157715
Source
Spinal Cord. 2008 Sep;46(9):616-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
A E Gibson
A C Buchholz
K A Martin Ginis
Author Affiliation
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada. abuchhol@uoguelph.ca
Source
Spinal Cord. 2008 Sep;46(9):616-21
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Biological Markers - analysis - blood
Body mass index
C-Reactive Protein - analysis - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Ontario - epidemiology
Paraplegia - blood - epidemiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Quadriplegia - blood - epidemiology
Risk factors
Spinal Cord Injuries - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
Cross-sectional.
In community-dwelling adults with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI), to (1) quantify C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk; (2) determine factors associated with CRP.
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
We examined CVD risk factors in 69 participants. Measurements included length, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, percent fat mass (bioelectrical impedance analysis) and fasting blood parameters (high-sensitivity CRP, lipids, insulin, glucose, insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)).
Mean CRP of the group was 3.37+/-2.86 mg-l(-1), consistent with the American Heart Association (AHA) definition of high risk of CVD. CRP was 74% higher in persons with tetraplegia (4.31+/-2.97) than those with paraplegia (2.47+/-2.47 mg l(-1), P=0.002), consistent with high CVD risk. Participants with high CRP (3.1-9.9 mg l(-1)) had greater waist circumference, BMI, percent fat mass and HOMA values than those with lower CRP (
PubMed ID
18414426 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.