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151 records – page 1 of 16.

Source
Can Fam Physician. 2001 Aug;47:1612, 1618
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
L. Cormier
Author Affiliation
Division of STD Prevention and Control, Bureau of HIV/AIDS, STD & TB, Health Canada. louise_cormier@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2001 Aug;47:1612, 1618
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Disease Notification
Herpes Simplex - congenital - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
PubMed ID
11561338 View in PubMed
Less detail

Amniocentesis and women with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or human immunodeficiency virus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186740
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2003 Feb;25(2):145-48, 149-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Gregory Davies
R Douglas Wilson
Valérie Désilets
Gregory J Reid
Dorothy Shaw
Anne Summers
Philip Wyatt
David Young
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2003 Feb;25(2):145-48, 149-52
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amniocentesis - methods
Canada
Female
HIV Infections - prevention & control - transmission
Hepatitis B - prevention & control - transmission
Hepatitis C - prevention & control - transmission
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical
MEDLINE
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - virology
Prenatal Diagnosis - methods
Risk factors
Abstract
To review the risk of in utero infection through amniocentesis in women with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).
Fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality.
Review articles, meta-analyses, and MEDLINE searches from 1966 to 2002 for English-language articles related to amniocentesis, fetal and neonatal infection, and hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or HIV.
The evidence collected was reviewed by the Genetics Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) and quantified using the Evaluation of Evidence guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Exam.
1. The risk of fetal hepatitis B infection through amniocentesis is low. However, knowledge of the maternal hepatitis B e antigen status is valuable in the counselling of risks associated with amniocentesis. (II-1C) 2. Amniocentesis in women infected with hepatitis C does not appear to significantly increase the risk of vertical transmission, but women should be counselled that very few studies have properly addressed this possibility. (II-2C) 3. In HIV-positive women all noninvasive screening tools should be used prior to considering amniocentesis. (II-2D) 4. For women infected with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or HIV, the addition of noninvasive methods of prenatal risk screening, such as nuchal translucency, triple screening, and anatomic ultrasound, may help in reducing the age-related risk to a level below the threshold for genetic amniocentesis. (II-2C) 5. For those women infected with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or HIV who insist on amniocentesis, every effort should be made to avoid inserting the needle through the placenta. (II-1B) VALIDATION: These guidelines have been approved by the SOGC Genetics Committee, SOGC Executive, and SOGC Council.
The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada.
PubMed ID
12577132 View in PubMed
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[Antibiotic treatment of women with group B Steptococci during delivery?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90709
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2008 Nov 6;128(21):2467-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-6-2008
Author
Kløvstad Hilde
Høiby E Arne
Aavitsland Preben
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for infeksjonsovervåking Nasjonalt folkehelseinstitutt Postboks 4404 Nydalen 0403 Oslo. hilde.klovstad@fhi.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2008 Nov 6;128(21):2467-9
Date
Nov-6-2008
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Carrier State - microbiology
Delivery, Obstetric
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Drug Utilization Review
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical - prevention & control
Penicillin G - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - drug therapy - microbiology
Streptococcal Infections - prevention & control - transmission
Streptococcus agalactiae - isolation & purification
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Transmission of group B Steptococci from mother to child during delivery may cause serious disease in some children, but this can be prevented by use of antibiotic treatment during delivery. We have estimated how antibiotic treatment of all pregnant carriers of group B streptococcus during delivery would affect the total antibiotic use in Norway. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We estimated the use of penicillin G for treatment of 10 %, 20 % and 30 % of streptococcus carriers among those delivering. The Medical Birth Registry was used to obtain number of births and the Norwegian Drug Wholesalers Database to obtain total use of the various substances. RESULTS: If 30 % of delivering women were carriers of group B streptococcus and treated with penicillin G, the treatment would equal 2.8 % of today's total use of penicillin G and 0.09 % of the total use of the whole group of beta-lactam antibacterial agents, penicillins. INTERPRETATION: Prophylactic antibiotic treatment of pregnant carriers of group B streptococcus during delivery would not lead to a substantial change in the current antibiotic use. The possibility of increasing antibiotic resistance should not be a main argument against using antibiotics in prevention of group B streptococcus infection in newborns.
PubMed ID
19096471 View in PubMed
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Antibodies to capsular polysaccharides of group B Streptococcus in pregnant Canadian women: relationship to colonization status and infection in the neonate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194114
Source
J Infect Dis. 2001 Aug 1;184(3):285-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2001
Author
H D Davies
C. Adair
A. McGeer
D. Ma
S. Robertson
M. Mucenski
L. Kowalsky
G. Tyrell
C J Baker
Author Affiliation
Departments of Microbiology and Infectious Disease, Pediatrics, and Community Health Sciences and Child Health Research Unit, Alberta Children's Hospital, University of Calgary, Calgary,T2T-5C7, Canada. dele.davies@crha-health.ab.ca
Source
J Infect Dis. 2001 Aug 1;184(3):285-91
Date
Aug-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Canada
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Infant, Newborn
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical
Parity
Polysaccharides, Bacterial - immunology
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - microbiology
Rectum - microbiology
Serotyping
Streptococcal Infections - blood - immunology - transmission
Streptococcus agalactiae - immunology - isolation & purification
Vagina - microbiology
Abstract
In a cohort study of 1207 pregnant women in Alberta, Canada, the serotype distributions of vaginal-rectal group B Streptococcus (GBS) isolates were compared with all isolates from neonates with invasive GBS disease identified by population-based surveillance. Serum concentrations of Ia, Ib, II, III, and V capsular polysaccharide (CPS)-specific IgG also were determined, according to serotype of the vaginal-rectal colonizing GBS strain. GBS colonization was detected in 19.5% (235 of 1207) of women. Serotype III accounted for 20.6% (48 of 233) of colonizing strains available for typing but for 37% (27 of 73) of invasive isolates from neonates (P
PubMed ID
11443553 View in PubMed
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Antiretroviral prophylaxis to prevent perinatal HIV transmission in St. Petersburg, Russia: too little, too late.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145635
Source
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2010 Jul;54(3):304-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Susan D Hillis
Elena Kuklina
Natalia Akatova
Dmitry M Kissin
Elena N Vinogradova
Aza G Rakhmanova
Elena Stepanova
Denise J Jamieson
Joanna Robinson
Charles Vitek
William C Miller
Author Affiliation
Division of Reproductive Health, NCCDPH, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. shillis@cdc.gov
Source
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2010 Jul;54(3):304-10
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-HIV Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical - prevention & control
Multivariate Analysis
Pregnancy
Russia - epidemiology
Sentinel Surveillance
Viral Load
Young Adult
Abstract
We evaluated the influence of type and timing of prophylaxis on perinatal HIV transmission in St. Petersburg, Russia.
We linked surveillance data for 1498 HIV-infected mothers delivering from 2004 to 2007 with polymerase chain reaction data for 1159 infants to determine predictors of transmission.
The overall perinatal transmission rate was 6.3% [73 of 1159, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.9% to 7.7%]. Among the 12.8% (n = 149) of mother-infant pairs receiving full course (antenatal, intrapartum, postnatal) dual/triple antiretroviral prophylaxis, the transmission rate was 2.7%. Among the 1010 receiving less complete regimens (full course zidovudine, single-dose nevirapine, or incomplete), transmission ranged from 4.1% to 12.2%. Among the 28.9% (330) of mothers initiating antiretroviral drugs or=29 weeks (or not at all) had increased transmission odds (adjusted odds ratio: 4.9, 95% CI: 1.8 to 12.9; odds ratio: 5.1, 95% CI: 2.0 to 13.1, respectively).
In St. Petersburg, the potential for further reductions in perinatal transmission is evident, given low transmission among women receiving early combination prophylaxis.
PubMed ID
20130471 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antiretroviral treatment of maternal HIV infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179324
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2004 Jun;50:865-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Haleh Talaie
Alejandro A Nava-Ocampo
Gideon Koren
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ont.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2004 Jun;50:865-8
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-HIV Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Female
HIV Infections - drug therapy - prevention & control - transmission
HIV-1
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical - prevention & control
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - drug therapy - virology
Risk factors
Women's health
Abstract
One of my pregnant patients tested positive for human immunodeficiency virus. Will HIV therapy put her pregnancy outcome at risk?
The biggest risk is vertical transmission of HIV to her baby. She should be treated with combination therapy; triple therapy is required to reduce vertical transmission. Zidovudine is not teratogenic in humans, but information on other antiretroviral drugs is incomplete.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15233367 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the decision support needs of women from HIV endemic countries regarding voluntary HIV testing in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168113
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2006 Nov;63(3):292-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Debjani Mitra
M J Jacobsen
Annette O'Connor
Kevin Pottie
Peter Tugwell
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, University of Ottawa, Roger Guindon, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada. dmitra@cheo.on.ca
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2006 Nov;63(3):292-300
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Serodiagnosis
Adult
Canada
Conflict (Psychology)
Counseling
Decision Making
Emigration and Immigration
Female
HIV Infections - prevention & control - transmission
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical - prevention & control
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Refugees
Abstract
To describe the decision support needs of immigrant and refugee women from HIV endemic countries regarding decision-making about voluntary counseling and testing for HIV (VCT) in Canada; and the needs of practitioners who support these women in making this decision, in a culturally appropriate manner.
Adapted, semi-structured questionnaires, based on the Ottawa Decision Support Framework (ODSF), were used to interview practitioners and patients. Practitioners from diverse backgrounds were purposefully selected from centers providing VCT in Ottawa. Adult, English-speaking immigrant and refugee women from HIV endemic countries were recruited from a clinic specializing in immigrant health services. Responses were tabulated using descriptive statistics, and emerging themes coded to identify unique factors affecting decision-making.
Analysis revealed differences between practitioner and patient perceptions of the decision-making needs of women from HIV endemic countries regarding VCT. Practitioners identified women's lack of knowledge about HIV transmission and prevention as a primary need, while patients identified inadequate awareness of HIV screening and treatment services, and their benefits and harms. Patients also perceived that women would not be aware of the various VCT options, while few practitioners highlighted this concern. Both groups held similar viewpoints about counseling strategies that could improve decision-making.
Women were unaware of the options available to them for VCT. Both practitioners and patients highlighted the issue of stigma and negative outcomes associated with testing that created barriers or contributed to delays in women receiving testing. Women preferred anonymous testing, and recommended that information and decision support regarding HIV testing be provided via non-targeted strategies, and integrated within general health services or public education.
Decision support in the context of VCT can improve decision quality, empowering patients to make informed decisions based on personal values. Study findings can inform the development of clinical guidelines for the routine offering of VCT.
PubMed ID
16876376 View in PubMed
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Barriers to prenatal care and poor pregnancy outcomes among women with syphilis in the Russian Federation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162676
Source
Int J STD AIDS. 2007 Jun;18(6):392-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
K L Southwick
L I Tikhonova
E G Salakhov
A. Shakarishvili
C. Ryan
S. Hillis
Author Affiliation
NY State Department of Health, Metropolitan Regional Area Office, Bureau of Communicable Disease Control, 145 Huguenot Street, Suite 500, New Rochelle, NY 10801, USA. kis08@health.state.ny.us
Source
Int J STD AIDS. 2007 Jun;18(6):392-5
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical - prevention & control
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - economics - microbiology - therapy
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Care
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Russia
Syphilis - economics - prevention & control - therapy - transmission
Abstract
We studied predictors of no prenatal care (PNC) and influence of no PNC on pregnancy outcome in a multisite study of 1071 women with syphilis in Russia. We assessed PNC utilization, HIV testing, syphilis treatment, and pregnancy outcome. We found that 37% of women with syphilis received no PNC, and 1% was HIV infected. Lacking official residency status was independently related to no PNC (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 8.1; 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 5.3-12.3). Among women with inadequately treated current syphilis, those without PNC were more likely to have a stillborn infant than those with PNC (25% vs. 3%, odds ratio [OR] 9.5, 95% CI 4.0-23.5). Women with adequately treated current syphilis and no PNC were more likely to deliver a low birth weight (OR 3.8; 95% CI 1.8-8.1) or preterm infant (OR 3.9; 95%CI 1.8-8.7). Women with previous or current syphilis and no PNC were significantly more likely to abandon their infants.
PubMed ID
17609028 View in PubMed
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Births and ectopic pregnancies in a large cohort of women tested for Chlamydia trachomatis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163762
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2007 Oct;34(10):739-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Inger Johanne Bakken
Finn Egil Skjeldestad
Stian Lydersen
Svein Arne Nordbø
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, SINTEF Health Research, Trondheim, Norway. inger.bakken@sintef.no
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2007 Oct;34(10):739-43
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Chlamydia Infections - complications - epidemiology - microbiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - isolation & purification
Cohort Studies
Female
Fertility
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical
Live Birth
Mass Screening
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - microbiology
Pregnancy, Ectopic - epidemiology - microbiology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Recent studies show divergent results concerning the risk of ectopic pregnancy following Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection.
Our goal was to investigate future reproductive health outcomes (births and ectopic pregnancies) among women tested for CT.
Our cohort consisted of 20,762 women born during 1970-1984 who were tested for CT during 1990-2003. We linked CT data to data on ectopic pregnancies and births during 1990-2004. Cox regression with time-dependent covariates was used to assess the association between CT history and births/ectopic pregnancies adjusted for age at first test. Analyses with ectopic pregnancy as outcome were also adjusted for parity.
We observed 9.6 births per 100 person-years of observation among women with negative tests only and 10.2 per 100 person-years among women with at least 1 positive test (hazard ratio adjusted for age at first test, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.01-1.12). Ectopic pregnancy incidence rates were higher for women with positive test(s) compared with women with negative test only (0.24 vs. 0.13 per 100 person-years; hazard ratio adjusted for age at first test and parity, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.27-2.60). Among women with at least 1 registered pregnancy, the adjusted hazard ratio was 2.03; 95% CI, 1.28-3.22).
Although women diagnosed with CT were at higher risk for ectopic pregnancy than women with negative test results only, our study suggest that their fertility prospects were better than they would have been had CT screening not been implemented in this population. Opportunistic CT screening is an appropriate method for maintaining female reproductive health.
PubMed ID
17479068 View in PubMed
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151 records – page 1 of 16.