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12 records – page 1 of 2.

Cluster of severe acute respiratory syndrome cases among protected health-care workers--Toronto, Canada, April 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184950
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2003 May 16;52(19):433-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-16-2003
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2003 May 16;52(19):433-6
Date
May-16-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cluster analysis
Cross Infection
Health Personnel
Humans
Infection Control
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
SARS Virus - isolation & purification
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy - transmission
Abstract
Infections among health-care workers (HCWs) have been a common feature of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) since its emergence. The majority of these infections have occurred in locations where infection-control precautions either had not been instituted or had been instituted but were not followed. Recommended infection-control precautions include the use of negative-pressure isolation rooms where available; N95 or higher level of respiratory protection; gloves, gowns, and eye protection; and careful hand hygiene. This report summarizes a cluster of SARS cases among HCWs in a hospital that occurred despite apparent compliance with recommended infection-control precautions.
PubMed ID
12807083 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Danish PEP Registry: Experience with the use of post-exposure prophylaxis following blood exposure to HIV from 1999-2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274063
Source
Infect Dis (Lond). 2016;48(3):195-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Suzanne Lunding
Terese L Katzenstein
Gitte Kronborg
Merete Storgaard
Court Pedersen
Birgitte Mørn
Jens Å Lindberg
Thit M Kronborg
Janne Jensen
Source
Infect Dis (Lond). 2016;48(3):195-200
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-HIV Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Blood-Borne Pathogens
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Guideline Adherence
HIV
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Hepatitis, Viral, Human - prevention & control - transmission
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - prevention & control
Post-Exposure Prophylaxis - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Registries
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The risk of occupational exposures to blood cannot be eliminated completely and access to post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) to prevent HIV transmission is important. However, PEP administration has been associated with frequent adverse effects, low compliance and difficulties to ensure a proper risk assessment. This nationwide study describes 14 years of experience with the use of PEP following blood exposure in Denmark.
A descriptive study of all PEP cases following non-sexual exposure to HIV in Denmark from 1999-2012.
A total of 411 cases of PEP were described. There was a mean of 29.4 cases/year, increasing from 23 cases in 1999 to 49 cases in 2005 and then decreasing to 16 cases in 2012. Overall 67.2% of source patients were known to be HIV-positive at the time of PEP initiation, with no significant change over time. The median time to initiation of PEP was 2.5 h (0.15-28.5) following occupational exposure. Adverse effects were reported by 50.9% with no significant difference according to PEP regimen. In 85.1% of cases with available data, either a full course of PEP was completed or PEP was stopped because the source was tested HIV-negative. Only 6.6% stopped PEP early due to adverse effects.
PEP in Denmark is generally prescribed according to the guidelines and the annual number of cases has declined since 2005. Adverse effects were common regardless of PEP regimens used and new drug regimens should be considered.
PubMed ID
26529586 View in PubMed
Less detail

From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Cluster of severe acute respiratory syndrome cases among protected health-care workers--Toronto, Canada, April 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185115
Source
JAMA. 2003 Jun 4;289(21):2788-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-4-2003

[Health improvement in the medical staff of tuberculosis services in the Primorsky Territory].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148991
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2009;(7):20-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
M V Bektasova
S P Nekrasov
A A Sheparev
E V Lastova
A A Potapenko
E A Anufrieva
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2009;(7):20-3
Date
2009
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Morbidity - trends
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Health
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Abstract
The authors analyze occupational morbidity rates in the medical personnel of tuberculosis facilities in the Primorsky Territory, as well as the location of the institutions (industrial premises) and the influence of production factors on medical workers. The nature of work and working conditions in the medical workers of a tuberculosis facility where they are exposed to industrial hazards in practically 100% of cases necessitate effective measures to be taken to preserve and promote their health. The absence of standard buildings and premises for tuberculosis facilities and the low efficiency of rehabilitative sanatorium-and-spa treatment, health improvement, and the prevention of occupational diseases are important problems of a tuberculosis service in the Primorsky Territory. The findings serve as the basis for the development of an approach to preventing occupational diseases and recovering the health of medical workers who have experienced tuberculosis.
PubMed ID
19697851 View in PubMed
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Infection control in the orthodontic office in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207622
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 1997 Sep;112(3):275-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
G M McCarthy
A H Mamandras
J K MacDonald
Author Affiliation
Division of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Western Ontario London, Canada.
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 1997 Sep;112(3):275-81
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - prevention & control
Blood-Borne Pathogens
Dental Offices
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Disinfection
HIV Infections - prevention & control
HIV-1
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Humans
Infection Control, Dental - instrumentation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Orthodontics - instrumentation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Sterilization
Universal Precautions
Abstract
Because of the difficulty of identifying infected persons, current recommendations for infection control are to treat all patients as if they are infected with blood-borne pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the hepatitis viruses. Dentists' compliance with these recommendations has been investigated previously, however, there are few data related to orthodontists. The objective of this study was to measure the proportion of orthodontists who report the use of recommended infection control procedures and to compare the infection control practices of orthodontists and general dentists. A mailed survey with three follow-up attempts was administered to all orthodontists and general dentists in Ontario (N = 5441) in 1994. There were significant differences in the routine use of gloves (orthodontists 85%, general dentists 92%); masks (orthodontists 38%, general dentists 75%); protective eyewear (orthodontists 60%, general dentists 84%); changing gloves after each patient (orthodontists 84%, general dentists 96%); and heat sterilization of handpieces (orthodontists 57%, general dentists 84%). Hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination of all clinical staff was reported by 46% of orthodontists, compared with 61% of general dentists (p
PubMed ID
9294356 View in PubMed
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Needlestick injuries in European nurses in diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127332
Source
Diabetes Metab. 2012 Jan;38 Suppl 1:S9-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
V. Costigliola
A. Frid
C. Letondeur
K. Strauss
Author Affiliation
European Medical Association, Brussels, Belgium.
Source
Diabetes Metab. 2012 Jan;38 Suppl 1:S9-14
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Diabetes mellitus
Europe - epidemiology
HIV Infections - prevention & control - transmission
Hepatitis B - prevention & control - transmission
Hepatitis C - prevention & control - transmission
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Needlestick Injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Nurses
Occupational Injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
With the June 2010 publication of EU Council Directive 2010/32/EU scrutiny is now being focused on the safety and protection of diabetes nurses.
We used a questionnaire to study the frequency and risks of Needlestick Injuries (NSI) associated with diabetic injections in European hospitals. 634 nurses participated from 13 western European countries and Russia.
When patients with diabetes who self-inject at home are hospitalized injections are given always by the staff in 31% of cases, by the patients themselves where possible in 33%, initially by staff, then the patient takes over in 12% and both staff and patient throughout the stay in 21%. 86% of nurses said their hospitals had a written policy on the prevention of NSI but, where it was available, only 56% were familiar with it. 67% of the nurses had not attended any training on the prevention of NSI and only 13% had attended one in the last year. 7.1% of nurses report recapping needles and 5.9% report storing unprotected needles temporarily on a tray, trolley or cart. 32% of nurses report suffering a NSI while giving a diabetic injection at some point in the past. 29.5% of NSI occurred while recapping a used needle. 57% of nurses unscrew pen needles using their own fingers. In 80% cases the source patient's identity was known and the sharp item was "contaminated" (known previous percutaneous exposure to patient) in almost half the cases (43%). NSIs were reported to the proper authorities in only 2/3 of cases.
Our study shows that frequent NSI occur in European nurses treating people with diabetes in hospital settings. These injuries are a source of possible infection despite the small size of diabetes needles. The introduction of safety-engineered medical devices has been shown to reduce the risk of injury. A new European Directive that has now come into force specifically stipulates that wherever there is risk of sharps injury, the user and all healthcare workers must be protected by adequate safety precautions, including the use of "medical devices incorporating safety-engineered protection mechanisms".
PubMed ID
22305441 View in PubMed
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[Occupational traumatism in blood service: improvement of the safety system].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152418
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 2008;167(6):83-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
E B Zhiburt
A A Vergopulo
N G Filina
M N Gubanova
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 2008;167(6):83-6
Date
2008
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Transfusion - instrumentation
Equipment Design - trends
Equipment Safety - standards - trends
Humans
Incidence
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Needlestick Injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Russia - epidemiology
Safety Management - trends
Abstract
An analysis of questionnaires used in the institutions of blood service has shown the absence of standards in maintenance of safety of the personnel storing up blood. Most frequent cases of contamination of the personnel with donors' blood was noted when venepunctions were being made, during filling the test-tubes from a tube, utilization of waste products, cutting the tubes and opening the test tubes. Introduction of a system of higher occupational safety of the personnel and successive action of using innovations, up-to-date configuration of hemocontainers with vacuum sampling of the first portion of blood for laboratory investigations and fixed closing the needle allows reduce occupational traumatism in blood service.
PubMed ID
19241824 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Priorities for health improvement in the medical personnel of phthisiatric service in the Primor'ie Territory].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122253
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 Mar-Apr;(2):26-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
M V Bektasova
V A Kaptsov
A A Sheparev
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 Mar-Apr;(2):26-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Health Resorts
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Medical Staff
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control - rehabilitation
Occupational Health
Occupational Health Services - methods - standards
Russia - epidemiology
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - rehabilitation - transmission
Workplace - standards
Abstract
The authors analyze occupational morbidity rates in the medical personnel of tuberculosis facilities in the Primorsky Territory, as well as the location of the institutions (workrooms) and the influence of occupational factors on medical workers. The nature of work and working conditions in the medical workers of a tuberculosis facility where they are exposed to occupational hazards in practically 100% of cases necessitate effective measures to promote and preserve their health. The absence of standard buildings and premises for tuberculosis facilities and the low efficiency of rehabilitative sanatorium-and-spa treatment, health improvement, and the prevention of occupational diseases are one of the problems of a tuberculosis service in the Primorsky Territory. The findings serve as the basis for the development of an approach to preventing occupational diseases and recovering the health status among the medical workers who have experienced tuberculosis.
PubMed ID
22834261 View in PubMed
Less detail

Quantifying and reducing the risk of bloodborne pathogen exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194314
Source
AORN J. 2001 Jun;73(6):1135-40, 1142-3, 1145-6; quiz 1147-8, 1151-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
B. Stringer
C. Infante-Rivard
J. Hanley
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario.
Source
AORN J. 2001 Jun;73(6):1135-40, 1142-3, 1145-6; quiz 1147-8, 1151-4
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood-Borne Pathogens
Canada - epidemiology
HIV Infections - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control - transmission
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control - transmission
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control - transmission
Humans
Infection Control - methods
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Exposure - analysis - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Perioperative Nursing
Risk factors
Risk Management
Surgical Procedures, Operative
United States - epidemiology
Viral vaccines
Abstract
The risk of becoming infected with bloodborne pathogens (e.g., hepatitis B, hepatitis C, HIV) during surgery is real. The degree of risk for perioperative personnel is related to factors that include participating in large numbers of surgical procedures each year; the nature of perioperative work (e.g., use of different types of sharp instruments): exposure to large amounts of blood and body fluids; the prevalence of bloodborne pathogens in the surgical population; the variation in different organisms' ability to be transmitted; the existence of vaccines and the level of vaccination; the availability of postexposure treatment; and the consequences of acquiring the disease. Controlling risks to perioperative personnel can be accomplished by using the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's three methods of control--redesigning surgical equipment and procedures, changing work practices, and enhancing the personal protection equipment of perioperative personnel.
PubMed ID
11409233 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.