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148 records – page 1 of 15.

[A casual link between shaking hands and risk of infection].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180803
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(3):305-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Annakaisa Suominen
Pentti Huovinen
Author Affiliation
Mikrobiekologian ja tulehdustautien osasto PL 57, 20521 Turku. annakaisa.suominen@ktl.fi
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(3):305-10
Date
2004
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - transmission
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hand Disinfection
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional
Male
Office Visits
Physician-Patient Relations
Risk assessment
PubMed ID
15061008 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accidental blood contact during orthopedic surgical procedures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208866
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1997 Apr;18(4):244-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
A C Folin
G M Nordström
Author Affiliation
Nursing Research Unit, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1997 Apr;18(4):244-6
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Blood-Borne Pathogens
Containment of Biohazards - standards
Humans
Infection Control - standards
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - methods - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Needlestick Injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Orthopedics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A questionnaire study was carried out of all orthopedic surgical procedures in the operating rooms of a teaching hospital over an 8-week period to describe the frequency and circumstances of accidental blood contact. Blood exposure occurred in 11% of the procedures. Contamination of intact skin was the most common incident (79%); percutaneous injury occurred in 13%. The majority of the incidents were believed to be preventable.
PubMed ID
9131366 View in PubMed
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Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1995 Jun;61(6):473
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
T J Swaine
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1995 Jun;61(6):473
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appointments and Schedules
Dental Care for Chronically Ill
HIV Seropositivity
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - prevention & control
Male
Ontario
Prejudice
Notes
Comment On: J Can Dent Assoc. 1995 Jan;61(1):25-77866924
Comment On: J Can Dent Assoc. 1995 Apr;61(4):277, 3507736331
PubMed ID
7614428 View in PubMed
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AIDS-related risks in the health care setting: HIV testing of health care workers and patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221292
Source
Queens Law J. 1993;18(1):71-128
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
W F Flanagan
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Law, Queen's University, Canada.
Source
Queens Law J. 1993;18(1):71-128
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disclosure - legislation & jurisprudence
HIV Infections - diagnosis - transmission
Health Personnel - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - prevention & control
Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient - prevention & control
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Mandatory Testing - legislation & jurisprudence
Prejudice
Abstract
Do patients and health care workers have the legal right to know each other's HIV status? Professor Flanagan argues that they do not. Given that with appropriate precautions the risk of transmitting HIV in the health care setting is extremely small and that the discriminatory consequences of HIV disclosure can be extremely high, it is suggested that the right of a patient or a health care worker not to disclose their HIV status must outweigh the other's "right to know."
PubMed ID
16086490 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of scabies in a long-term care facility: the role of misdiagnosis and the costs associated with control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169457
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2006 May;27(5):517-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Gretha de Beer
Mark A Miller
Lucie Tremblay
Johanne Monette
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa. grethadb@lantic.net
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2006 May;27(5):517-8
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Diagnostic Errors
Disease Outbreaks
Disinfection - methods
Female
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Infection Control - economics
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional
Long-Term Care
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes
Scabies - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
In August 2003, an outbreak of scabies was detected in a Canadian long-term care facility. The outbreak was likely associated with 2 index cases, 1 involving classic scabies and the other involving Norwegian scabies. The scabies control costs totaled CDN $200,000, and the facility received negative publicity for a short period after the outbreak.
PubMed ID
16671037 View in PubMed
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[Apropos the article "The rapid computerized analysis of dental patients for AIDS" (A. N. Balashov et al., Stomatologiia 1997; 4: 74)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201823
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 1999;78(3):68-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999

Barriers and motivators affecting tuberculosis infection control practices of Russian health care workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123562
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2012 Aug;16(8):1092-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
W. Woith
G. Volchenkov
J. Larson
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Mennonite College of Nursing at Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois 61761, USA. wwoith1@uic.edu
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2012 Aug;16(8):1092-6
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cultural Characteristics
Equipment Contamination
Fear
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - psychology
Health promotion
Humans
Infection Control - methods
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - prevention & control
Inpatients
Male
Motivation
Occupational Exposure
Patient care team
Qualitative Research
Respiration, Artificial - instrumentation
Russia - epidemiology
Tuberculosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control - transmission
Ventilators, Mechanical - microbiology
Abstract
Five in-patient and out-patient tuberculosis (TB) care facilities in two regions of Russia.
To identify barriers and motivators to the use of infection control measures among Russian TB health care workers.
In this qualitative study, a convenience sample of 96 health care workers (HCWs) was used to generate 15 homogeneous focus groups, consisting of physicians, nurses, and laboratory or support staff.
Barriers and motivators related to knowledge, attitudes and beliefs, and practices were identified. The three main barriers were 1) knowledge deficits, including the belief that TB was transmitted by dust, linens and eating utensils; 2) negative attitudes related to the discomfort of respirators; and 3) practices with respect to quality and care of respirators. Education and training, fear of infecting loved ones, and fear of punishment were the main motivators.
Our results point to the need for evaluation of current educational programs. Positive health promotion messages that appeal to fear might also be successful in promoting TB infection control. Individualized rewards based on personal motivators or group rewards that build on collectivist theory could be explored.
Notes
Cites: Health Psychol. 1986;5(1):25-433720718
Cites: Health Libr Rev. 2000 Dec;17(4):194-20211198325
Cites: MMWR Recomm Rep. 2005 Dec 30;54(RR-17):1-14116382216
Cites: Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2010 Nov;14(11):1489-9220937192
Cites: Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2010 Oct;14(10):1323-920843425
Cites: Ann Occup Hyg. 2009 Nov;53(8):815-2719805391
Cites: Am J Infect Control. 2009 Oct;37(8):668-7319403197
Cites: J Hosp Infect. 2009 May;72(1):57-6419278753
Cites: JAMA. 2009 Jan 7;301(1):36-819126810
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2007;7:21117705841
Cites: Health Care Women Int. 2004 Mar;25(3):210-2615195767
Cites: Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2005 Jan;9(1):43-815675549
Cites: Am Psychol. 1989 Sep;44(9):1175-842782727
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Cites: Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2005 Aug;9(8):841-716104628
Cites: Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2004 Dec;35(4):1005-1115916106
Cites: Tuberculosis (Edinb). 2004;84(1-2):19-2314670342
PubMed ID
22687261 View in PubMed
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148 records – page 1 of 15.