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49 records – page 1 of 5.

Accidental blood contact during orthopedic surgical procedures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208866
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1997 Apr;18(4):244-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
A C Folin
G M Nordström
Author Affiliation
Nursing Research Unit, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1997 Apr;18(4):244-6
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Blood-Borne Pathogens
Containment of Biohazards - standards
Humans
Infection Control - standards
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - methods - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Needlestick Injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Orthopedics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A questionnaire study was carried out of all orthopedic surgical procedures in the operating rooms of a teaching hospital over an 8-week period to describe the frequency and circumstances of accidental blood contact. Blood exposure occurred in 11% of the procedures. Contamination of intact skin was the most common incident (79%); percutaneous injury occurred in 13%. The majority of the incidents were believed to be preventable.
PubMed ID
9131366 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 2007 Nov 20;177(11):1342
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-20-2007
Author
Deborah Jones
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Nov 20;177(11):1342
Date
Nov-20-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Government Regulation
Health Policy
Humans
Infection Control - standards
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
18025420 View in PubMed
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[Antibiotic susceptibility of isolates from blood of patients in intensive care units of emergency medical service].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129081
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 2011;56(5-6):30-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
T V Chernen'kaia
L A Borisova
T Iu Vorob'eva
I V Aleksandrova
D A Kosolapov
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 2011;56(5-6):30-6
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetamides - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Bacteria, Anaerobic - drug effects - isolation & purification
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - etiology
Candida - drug effects - isolation & purification
Cross Infection - drug therapy - etiology - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Gram-Negative Bacteria - drug effects - isolation & purification
Gram-Positive Bacteria - drug effects - isolation & purification
Humans
Imipenem - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Infection Control - standards
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Moscow
Oxazolidinones - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Sepsis - drug therapy - etiology - microbiology
Thienamycins - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Vancomycin - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Abstract
The microbiological tests of 769 blood samples from 220 patients, treated in 4 intensive care units of the N.V. Sklifosovsky Research Institute for Emergency Medical Service within a period from January 2009 to June 2010, were analysed. Etiologically significant microorganisms were detected in 323 samples (42%). 253 isolates were used in the analysis. Grampositive and gramnegative pathogens were detected in 47 and 42% of the cases respectively. Candida and anaerobic organisms were isolated in 8 and 3% of the cases respectively. Staphylococcus aureus and enterococci were isolated in 24 and 15% of the cases respectively. Nonfermenting gramnegative bacteria and enterobacteria were revealed in 25 and 17% of the cases respectively. Differences in the spectrum of the sepsis pathogens depending on the patients contingent were shown. The maximum summary susceptibility of the grampositive cocci was observed with respect to vancomycin and linezolid and that of the gramnegative bacteria was stated with respect to imipenem and meropenem.
PubMed ID
22145228 View in PubMed
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APIC/CHICA-Canada Infection Control and Epidemiology: Professional and Practice Standards. Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc, and the Community and Hospital Infection Control Association-Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202287
Source
Am J Infect Control. 1999 Feb;27(1):47-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999

Bloodborne pathogens in the health care setting: risk for transmission. Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Health and Welfare Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221349
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1993 Apr;59(4):363-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993

Blood exposure: factors promoting health care workers' compliance with guidelines in connection with risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179756
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2004 Jul;13(5):547-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Ulla-Britt Lymer
Bengt Richt
Barbro Isaksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. ulla-britt.lymer@hhj.hj.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2004 Jul;13(5):547-54
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Blood-Borne Pathogens
Cross Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control
Guideline Adherence - standards
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Infection Control - standards
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - prevention & control
Nurses' Aides - education - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure - prevention & control
Occupational Health
Organizational Culture
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Socialization
Stereotyping
Sweden - epidemiology
Universal Precautions
Abstract
Health care workers compliance with guidelines, universal precautions, in connection with tasks that could involve contact with patient's blood is unsatisfactory. In a previous paper, we identified different forces that undermine compliance. Socialization into infection control, routinization, stereotyping, perceptions of patients' wishes and the presence of competing values and norms are examples of such forces.
The aim of this article is to describe and analyse different forces that promote adherence to universal precautions. Behavioural variations are seen as a consequence of differences between wards with regard to the safety culture. Safety culture is conceptualized as the outcome of a constant interplay between deactivating and reactivating forces. In this article the focus is on the latter.
The grounded theory approach. Data were collected through interviews with nurses and assistant nurses.
The charge nurse, informal leaders, students, infection control nurses, type of work, availability of equipment, blood-exposure incidents and media-coverage of infectious diseases are described as potentially important for compliance. The properties these agents must possess in order to be influential are also described.
The outcome of an occupationally acquired infection can be fatal. Hence it is important that health care workers take protective measures. The results imply that mere information about safe practices alone is insufficient to achieve that goal. All factors of importance for compliance must be taken in to consideration in clinical work and in education.
PubMed ID
15189407 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lancet. 1992 Nov 28;340(8831):1341-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-28-1992

Classic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in Canada. An infection control guideline. Health Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185950
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2002 Nov;28 Suppl 5:1-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002

49 records – page 1 of 5.