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Acceptability of a wearable hand hygiene device with monitoring capabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155144
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2008 Nov;70(3):216-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
V M Boscart
K S McGilton
A. Levchenko
G. Hufton
P. Holliday
G R Fernie
Author Affiliation
Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. boscart.veronique@torontorehab.on.ca
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2008 Nov;70(3):216-22
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross Infection - prevention & control
Electronics
Female
Focus Groups
Gels - administration & dosage
Hand Disinfection
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Infection Control - instrumentation - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Reminder Systems - instrumentation
Abstract
Transmisssion of infection within healthcare institutions is a significant threat to patients and staff. One of the most effective means of prevention is good hand hygiene. A research team at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Ontario, Canada, developed a wearable hand disinfection system with monitoring capabilities to enhance hand wash frequency. We present the findingsof the first phase of a larger study addressing the hypothesis that an electronic hand hygiene system with monitoring and reminding propertieswill increase hand hygiene compliance. This first phase focused on the acceptability and usability of the wearable electronic hand wash device ina clinical environment. The feedback from healthcare staff to the first prototype has provided evidence for the research team to continue with the development of this technology.
Notes
Erratum In: J Hosp Infect. 2009 Apr;71(4):389
PubMed ID
18799234 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accidental blood contact during orthopedic surgical procedures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208866
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1997 Apr;18(4):244-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
A C Folin
G M Nordström
Author Affiliation
Nursing Research Unit, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1997 Apr;18(4):244-6
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Blood-Borne Pathogens
Containment of Biohazards - standards
Humans
Infection Control - standards
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - methods - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Needlestick Injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Orthopedics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A questionnaire study was carried out of all orthopedic surgical procedures in the operating rooms of a teaching hospital over an 8-week period to describe the frequency and circumstances of accidental blood contact. Blood exposure occurred in 11% of the procedures. Contamination of intact skin was the most common incident (79%); percutaneous injury occurred in 13%. The majority of the incidents were believed to be preventable.
PubMed ID
9131366 View in PubMed
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The adenosine triphosphate method as a quality control tool to assess 'cleanliness' of frequently touched hospital surfaces.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273379
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2015 Oct;91(2):166-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
L. Knape
A. Hambraeus
B. Lytsy
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2015 Oct;91(2):166-70
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenosine Triphosphate - analysis
Environmental Microbiology
Hospitals
Housekeeping, Hospital - methods - standards
Humans
Infection control - methods - standards
Microbiological Techniques - methods
Prospective Studies
Quality Control
Sweden
Abstract
The adenosine triphosphate (ATP) method is widely accepted as a quality control method to complement visual assessment, in the specifications of requirements, when purchasing cleaning contractors in Swedish hospitals.
To examine whether the amount of biological load, as measured by ATP on frequently touched near-patient surfaces, had been reduced after an intervention; to evaluate the correlation between visual assessment and ATP levels on the same surfaces; to identify aspects of the performance of the ATP method as a tool in evaluating hospital cleanliness.
A prospective intervention study in three phases was carried out in a medical ward and an intensive care unit (ICU) at a regional hospital in mid-Sweden between 2012 and 2013. Existing cleaning procedures were defined and baseline tests were sampled by visual inspection and ATP measurements of ten frequently touched surfaces in patients' rooms before and after intervention. The intervention consisted of educating nursing staff about the importance of hospital cleaning and direct feedback of ATP levels before and after cleaning.
The mixed model showed a significant decrease in ATP levels after the intervention (P
PubMed ID
26213368 View in PubMed
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Advancing infection control in dental care settings: factors associated with dentists' implementation of guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120263
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2012 Oct;143(10):1127-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Jennifer L Cleveland
Arthur J Bonito
Tammy J Corley
Misty Foster
Laurie Barker
G. Gordon Brown
Nancy Lenfestey
Linda Lux
Author Affiliation
Division of Oral Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, MS F-10, 4770 Buford Highway, Atlanta, Ga. 30341, USA. JLCleveland@cdc.gov
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2012 Oct;143(10):1127-38
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel
Canada
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Dental Instruments
Dentist's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Education, Dental, Continuing
Female
Guideline Adherence
Guidelines as Topic
Health Plan Implementation
Humans
Infection Control, Dental - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Needlestick Injuries - prevention & control
Questionnaires
United States
United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration
Water Microbiology
Abstract
The authors set out to identify factors associated with implementation by U.S. dentists of four practices first recommended in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Guidelines for Infection Control in Dental Health-Care Settings-2003.
In 2008, the authors surveyed a stratified random sample of 6,825 U.S. dentists. The response rate was 49 percent. The authors gathered data regarding dentists' demographic and practice characteristics, attitudes toward infection control, sources of instruction regarding the guidelines and knowledge about the need to use sterile water for surgical procedures. Then they assessed the impact of those factors on the implementation of four recommendations: having an infection control coordinator, maintaining dental unit water quality, documenting percutaneous injuries and using safer medical devices, such as safer syringes and scalpels. The authors conducted bivariate analyses and proportional odds modeling.
Responding dentists in 34 percent of practices had implemented none or one of the four recommendations, 40 percent had implemented two of the recommendations and 26 percent had implemented three or four of the recommendations. The likelihood of implementation was higher among dentists who acknowledged the importance of infection control, had practiced dentistry for less than 30 years, had received more continuing dental education credits in infection control, correctly identified more surgical procedures that require the use of sterile water, worked in larger practices and had at least three sources of instruction regarding the guidelines. Dentists with practices in the South Atlantic, Middle Atlantic or East South Central U.S. Census divisions were less likely to have complied.
Implementation of the four recommendations varied among U.S. dentists. Strategies targeted at raising awareness of the importance of infection control, increasing continuing education requirements and developing multiple modes of instruction may increase implementation of current and future Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines.
Notes
Erratum In: J Am Dent Assoc. 2012 Dec;143(12):1289
PubMed ID
23024311 View in PubMed
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Adverse effects of amantadine and oseltamivir used during respiratory outbreaks in a center for developmentally disabled adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177196
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2004 Nov;25(11):955-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Allison J McGeer
Wayne Lee
Mark Loeb
Andrew E Simor
Margaret McArthur
Karen Green
Jonathan Hayfron Benjamin
Charles Gardner
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2004 Nov;25(11):955-61
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetamides - adverse effects
Adult
Aged
Amantadine - adverse effects
Antiviral Agents - adverse effects
Child
Comorbidity
Developmental Disabilities - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - chemically induced
Humans
Incidence
Infection Control - methods - statistics & numerical data
Long-Term Care - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nervous System Diseases - chemically induced
Ontario - epidemiology
Oseltamivir
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Antiviral prophylaxis is recommended for the control of institutional influenza A outbreaks. In long-term-care institutions other than nursing homes, neither the seriousness of influenza nor the risks and benefits of antiviral prophylaxis is clearly understood. We studied the severity of illness due to influenza among adults residing in a center for the developmentally disabled and assessed adverse reactions to amantadine and oseltamivir prophylaxis.
Data were collected from the charts of consenting residents. Complications of upper respiratory tract illness were recorded. Potential adverse events were documented during amantadine and oseltamivir therapy, and during a baseline period with neither medication.
The median age of the 287 participants was 46.4 years. Only 15 (5%) were older than 65 years, and 69 (24%) had chronic underlying medical illness placing them at high risk for influenza. Of the 122 residents with an upper respiratory tract infection, 16 (13%) developed pneumonia, 12 (9.8%) were hospitalized, and 5 (4%) died. Twenty-eight (25%) of 112 residents had an adverse neurologic event while receiving amantadine prophylaxis, compared with 3 (2.7%) receiving no antiviral medication and 5 (4.5%) receiving oseltamivir (P
PubMed ID
15566030 View in PubMed
Less detail

Agent-based modeling of the spread of influenza-like illness in an emergency department: a simulation study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132467
Source
IEEE Trans Inf Technol Biomed. 2011 Nov;15(6):877-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Marek Laskowski
Bryan C P Demianyk
Julia Witt
Shamir N Mukhi
Marcia R Friesen
Robert D McLeod
Author Affiliation
Internet Innovation Centre, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. mareklaskowski@gmail.com
Source
IEEE Trans Inf Technol Biomed. 2011 Nov;15(6):877-89
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology - transmission
Computer simulation
Cross Infection - transmission
Decision Support Techniques
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Humans
Infection Control - methods
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - transmission
Least-Squares Analysis
Models, organizational
Models, Statistical
Abstract
The objective of this paper was to develop an agent-based modeling framework in order to simulate the spread of influenza virus infection on a layout based on a representative hospital emergency department in Winnipeg, Canada. In doing so, the study complements mathematical modeling techniques for disease spread, as well as modeling applications focused on the spread of antibiotic-resistant nosocomial infections in hospitals. Twenty different emergency department scenarios were simulated, with further simulation of four infection control strategies. The agent-based modeling approach represents systems modeling, in which the emergency department was modeled as a collection of agents (patients and healthcare workers) and their individual characteristics, behaviors, and interactions. The framework was coded in C++ using Qt4 libraries running under the Linux operating system. A simple ordinary least squares (OLS) regression was used to analyze the data, in which the percentage of patients that became infected in one day within the simulation was the dependent variable. The results suggest that within the given instance context, patient-oriented infection control policies (alternate treatment streams, masking symptomatic patients) tend to have a larger effect than policies that target healthcare workers. The agent-based modeling framework is a flexible tool that can be made to reflect any given environment; it is also a decision support tool for practitioners and policymakers to assess the relative impact of infection control strategies. The framework illuminates scenarios worthy of further investigation, as well as counterintuitive findings.
PubMed ID
21813364 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Nov 20;177(11):1342
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-20-2007
Author
Deborah Jones
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Nov 20;177(11):1342
Date
Nov-20-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Government Regulation
Health Policy
Humans
Infection Control - standards
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
18025420 View in PubMed
Less detail

765 records – page 1 of 77.