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162 records – page 1 of 17.

A 15-Year Follow-Up Study of Sense of Humor and Causes of Mortality: The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284817
Source
Psychosom Med. 2016 Apr;78(3):345-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Solfrid Romundstad
Sven Svebak
Are Holen
Jostein Holmen
Source
Psychosom Med. 2016 Apr;78(3):345-53
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Affect
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Cognition
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infection - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Protective factors
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Social Perception
Wit and Humor as Topic
Abstract
Associations between the sense of humor and survival in relation to specific diseases has so far never been studied.
We conducted a 15-year follow-up study of 53,556 participants in the population-based Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, Norway. Cognitive, social, and affective components of the sense of humor were obtained, and associations with all-cause mortality, mortality due to cardiovascular diseases (CVD), infections, cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases were estimated by hazard ratios (HRs).
After multivariate adjustments, high scores on the cognitive component of the sense of humor were significantly associated with lower all-cause mortality in women (HR = 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.33-0.81), but not in men (HR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.59-1.32). Mortality due to CVD was significantly lower in women with high scores on the cognitive component (HR = 0.27, 95% CI = 0.15-0.47), and so was mortality due to infections both in men (HR = 0.26, 95% CI = 0.09-0.74) and women (HR = 0.17, 95% CI = 0.04-0.76). The social and affective components of the sense of humor were not associated with mortality. In the total population, the positive association between the cognitive component of sense of humor and survival was present until the age of 85 years.
The cognitive component of the sense of humor is positively associated with survival from mortality related to CVD and infections in women and with infection-related mortality in men. The findings indicate that sense of humor is a health-protecting cognitive coping resource.
PubMed ID
26569539 View in PubMed
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Abortion and calf mortality in Danish cattle herds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64883
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 1993;34(4):371-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
J S Agerholm
A. Basse
H V Krogh
K. Christensen
L. Rønsholt
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology and Epidemiology, National Veterinary Laboratory, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 1993;34(4):371-7
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Veterinary - etiology
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Cattle
Cattle Diseases - etiology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Death - veterinary
Infection - mortality - veterinary
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The aetiology of abortions and calf mortality in 65 Danish cattle herds consisting of both dairy and beef breeds during a 1-year period is described. All observed aborted foetuses, still-born calves, and calves dying before 6 months of age were necropsied, and relevant microbiological examinations were performed. A total of 240 calves and 66 abortions were submitted corresponding to a calf mortality rate of 7%. The abortion frequency could not be calculated. 43% of the calves died at day 0, while 22% were aborted, 15% died during the first week of life, 9% died from 1 to 4 weeks of age, and 11% died at the age of 1 to 6 months. The most common cause was neonatal pulmonic atelectasis (stillbirth) followed by foetal infections, pneumonia, and septicaemia.
PubMed ID
8147289 View in PubMed
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[Actual problems of vaccine prophylaxis in the Russian Federation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104494
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2014 Jan-Feb;(1):9-19
Publication Type
Article
Author
G G Onishchenko
E B Ezhlova
A A Mel'nikova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2014 Jan-Feb;(1):9-19
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Infections - mortality - prevention & control
Communicable Disease Control - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Russia - epidemiology
Vaccines - standards - therapeutic use
Virus Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
World Health Organization
Abstract
The WHO within the framework of extended immunization program assumes a significant increase of the number of vaccine controlled infections by 2020 - 2025 to 27 - 37 including protection from diseases of parasitic etiology. Russia contributes to the international efforts of the WHO to control infections with vaccine prophylaxis. The national calendar of prophylaxis vaccinations currently provides vaccination against 11 infections--tuberculosis, hepatitis B, poliomyelitis, pertussis, diphtheria, tetanus, measles, rubella, epidemic parotitis, influenza, haemophilus type B infection. Significant progress in reduction of infectious morbidity controlled by means of specific prophylaxis has been made in the country.
PubMed ID
24738288 View in PubMed
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Advances in perinatal care and declining regional neonatal mortality in Finland, 1968-82.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237049
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1986 May;75(3):362-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1986
Author
A. Tenovuo
P. Kero
P. Piekkala
M. Sillanpää
R. Erkkola
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1986 May;75(3):362-9
Date
May-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asphyxia Neonatorum - mortality
Bacterial Infections - mortality
Birth weight
Cerebral Hemorrhage - mortality
Child Welfare
Congenital Abnormalities - mortality
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Finland
Humans
Infant care
Infant mortality
Infant Welfare
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - mortality
Virus Diseases - mortality
Abstract
Neonatal mortality (NNM) was investigated in the region of the University Central Hospital of Turku (UCHT), Finland, during a 15-year period from 1968 till 1982. During the study period 81 620 liveborn infants were born. The NNM rate declined from 13.5 in 1968 to 3.0 in 1982 during the study period. Significant declines occurred in NNM due to respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and asphyxia. The decline in NNM was more obvious during the early neonatal period (0-6 days after birth) and in the low birth weight (LBW) group (BW less than 2500 g). We believe that centralization of obstetric and neonatal services in risk cases and the new neonatal intensive care accounted for the decline in NNM.
PubMed ID
3727999 View in PubMed
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[Age-related dynamics of roach infection rate with Ligula intestinalis (Cestoda: Ligulidae) plerocercoids and probability of its usage for the calculation of host death rate].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261046
Source
Parazitologiia. 2014 May-Jun;48(3):245-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
N M Pronin
S V Pronina
Source
Parazitologiia. 2014 May-Jun;48(3):245-50
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Cestoda - physiology
Cestode Infections - mortality
Cyprinidae - physiology
Fish Diseases - mortality - parasitology
Lakes - parasitology
Siberia
Abstract
Results of special parasitological dissections of roach samples from catches with the same fishing gear and at the same station (Monakhovo Cove, Chivyrkui Bay of the Lake Baikal) and at the same time in different years (1998-2002) are given. Stability of age-related dynamics of roach infection rate with Ligula intestinalisis in different years with the maximum of prevalence and mean abundance in fish of 3+ age, and the following sharp decrease in these rates in elder age groups, was revealed. Basing on prevalence decreasing of a single roach generation, the rate of fish mortality during its growth from age group 3+ to 4+ was estimated as 15.9-20.7%.
PubMed ID
25693329 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of deaths during hospitalization and after discharge from hospital]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92241
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Aug 18;170(34):2571-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-18-2008
Author
Bommersholdt Martin E
Sørensen Henrik Ancher
Andersen Teis
Author Affiliation
Roskilde Sygehus, Sygehusadministrationen, Kvalitetsenheden, Sygehus Nord, Roskilde. mebo@regionsjaelland.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Aug 18;170(34):2571-5
Date
Aug-18-2008
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Incidence
Infection - mortality
Length of Stay
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Patient Discharge
Respiratory Tract Diseases - mortality
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Analysis of deaths during and up to one month after discharge from hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: For 2006, all deaths during and up to one month after discharge were identified for patients admitted to hospital in Roskilde or Køge. Age, acute or planned hospitalisation, duration of in-hospital stay, department of discharge and main diagnose were registered. RESULTS: Out of 50,302 hospitalisations, 2.2% had a fatal outcome during hospitalisation, whereas 2.1% died within the following month. During hospitalisation, the proportion of deaths among patients with either planned or acute admission was 1.1% and 2.6%, respectively. For several diagnose groups the risk of death during the first month after discharge was higher than that of fatal outcome during hospitalisation. The diagnose groups most frequently related to fatal outcome were cancers, infectious diseases, cardiovascular diseases and respiratory diseases. Pneumonia was the most prevalent benign diagnosis for fatal cases during hospitalisation. Data are provided for mortality related to diagnose and age group. The incidence of fatal outcome increased with the length of in-patient stay. CONCLUSION: Analysis of fatality rates also during planned hospitalisations and within the first month after acute as well as planned hospitalisations should be in focus when planning quality improvement projects.
PubMed ID
18761842 View in PubMed
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An analysis of maternal deaths in British Columbia: 1963 to 1970.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253563
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1974 Apr 6;110(7):783-4 passim
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-6-1974
Author
J L Benedet
W D Thomas
B H Yuen
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1974 Apr 6;110(7):783-4 passim
Date
Apr-6-1974
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Criminal
Anesthesia, Obstetrical - adverse effects
Bacterial Infections - mortality
British Columbia
Embolism, Air - mortality
Embolism, Amniotic Fluid - mortality
Female
Humans
Maternal mortality
Obstetric Labor Complications - mortality
Postpartum Hemorrhage - mortality
Pre-Eclampsia - mortality
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
Pregnancy, Ectopic - mortality
Uterine Hemorrhage - mortality
Vascular Diseases - mortality
Abstract
There were 132 maternal deaths in British Columbia in the years 1963 to 1970. The mean maternal mortality rate for these eight years was 0.317. Sixty of these deaths (45.5%) were due to direct obstetrical causes. Indirect and nonrelated deaths accounted for 21.2 and 33.3% of the total, respectively. The most common causes of direct obstetrical deaths were hemorrhage, infection and vascular accidents, in that order; pre-eclampsia ranked a distant fourth. Ninety-five percent of direct obstetrical deaths were probably avoidable. Approximately 27% of all direct obstetrical deaths were abortion-related. Hemorrhage continues to be a major problem, in particular among the native Indian women of the province.If further reduction in maternal mortality is to be achieved, obstetrical hemorrhage must be better managed and deaths due to abortions reduced. Future studies should reveal if the liberalized abortion laws will assist in the realization of the latter goal.
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1965 Jan 23;92:160-7014232190
PubMed ID
4545159 View in PubMed
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Another prisoner dies of HIV in a CSC institution--medical parole not considered until too late.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164548
Source
HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2006 Dec;11(2-3):41-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Glenn Betteridge
Source
HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2006 Dec;11(2-3):41-2
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
HIV Infections - mortality
Humans
Prisoners
Quebec
Abstract
In a 20 July 2006 report, a Québec Coroner criticized Correctional Service Canada's (CSC) handling of a prisoner who died of HIV-related complication while imprisoned. The Coroner recommended that CSC change the way it handles cases of medical parole.
PubMed ID
17373077 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa associated with increased risk of patient death in an intensive care unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188915
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2002 Aug;23(8):441-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Geir Bukholm
Tone Tannaes
Anne Britt Bye Kjelsberg
Nils Smith-Erichsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Epidemiology and Molecular Biology, Akershus University Hospital, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2002 Aug;23(8):441-6
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Cluster analysis
Cross Infection - mortality - prevention & control
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Infection Control - methods
Intensive Care Units
Logistic Models
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Pseudomonas Infections - mortality - prevention & control
Risk factors
Water Microbiology
Abstract
To investigate an outbreak of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an intensive care unit (ICU).
Epidemiologic investigation, environmental assessment, and ambidirectional cohort study.
A secondary-care university hospital with a 10-bed ICU.
All patients admitted to the ICU receiving ventilator treatment from December 1, 1999, to September 1, 2000.
An outbreak in an ICU with multidrug-resistant isolates of P aeruginosa belonging to one amplified fragment-length polymorphism (AFLP)-defined genetic cluster was identified, characterized, and cleared. Molecular typing of bacterial isolates with AFLP made it possible to identify the outbreak and make rational decisions during the outbreak period. The outbreak included 19 patients during the study period. Infection with bacterial isolates belonging to the AFLP cluster was associated with reduced survival (odds ratio, 5.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.14 to 24.26). Enhanced barrier and hygiene precautions, cohorting of patients, and altered antibiotic policy were not sufficient to eliminate the outbreak. At the end of the study period (in July), there was a change in the outbreak pattern from long (December to June) to short (July) incubation times before colonization and from primarily tracheal colonization (December to June) to primarily gastric or enteral July) colonization. In this period, the bacterium was also isolated from water taps.
Complete elimination of the outbreak was achieved after weekly pasteurization of the water taps of the ICU and use of sterile water as a solvent in the gastric tubes.
PubMed ID
12186209 View in PubMed
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162 records – page 1 of 17.