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Are stepchildren over-represented as victims of lethal parental violence in Sweden?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30379
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2004 Feb 7;271 Suppl 3:S124-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-7-2004
Author
Hans Temrin
Johanna Nordlund
Helena Sterner
Author Affiliation
Division of Ethology, Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. temrin@zoologi.su.se
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2004 Feb 7;271 Suppl 3:S124-6
Date
Feb-7-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Domestic Violence
Homicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infanticide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Parent-Child Relations
Parents
Sweden
Abstract
Evolutionary psychologists have suggested that stepchildren should be over-represented as victims of lethal parental violence compared with children living with their two genetic parents, because of relatively more lapses in parental solicitude among stepparents. In our study, using data over a period of 35 years in Sweden (1965-1999), there was no overall over-representation of stepchildren as victims. For very young stepchildren there was a tendency for over-representation. In families with both stepchildren and children genetically related to the offender, genetic children tended to be more likely to be victims.
PubMed ID
15101439 View in PubMed
Less detail

The "Cinderella effect" is no fairy tale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172492
Source
Trends Cogn Sci. 2005 Nov;9(11):507-8; author reply 508-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Source
J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2005;33(3):354-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Dominique Bourget
Pierre Gagné
Author Affiliation
Royal Ottawa Hospital, 1145 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1Z 7K4. dbourget@rohcg.on.ca
Source
J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2005;33(3):354-60
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cause of Death
Child
Child Abuse - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Child Mortality
Child of Impaired Parents
Child, Preschool
Coroners and Medical Examiners - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - statistics & numerical data
Fathers - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infanticide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Mothers - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Quebec - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In this retrospective study, relevant demographic, social, and clinical variables were examined in 77 cases of paternal filicide. Between 1991 and 2001, all consecutive coroners' files on domestic homicide in Québec, Canada, were reviewed, and 77 child victims of 60 male parent perpetrators were identified. The results support data indicating that more fathers commit filicide than do mothers. A history of family abuse was characteristic of a substantial number of cases, and most of the cases involved violent means of homicide. Filicide was frequently (60%) followed by the suicide of the perpetrator and more so (86%) in cases involving multiple sibling victims. The abuse of drugs and alcohol was rare. At the time of the offense, most of the perpetrators were suffering from a psychiatric illness, usually depressive disorder. Nearly one-third were in a psychotic state. The proportion of fatal abuse cases was comparatively low. Many of the perpetrators had had contact with health professionals prior to the offense, although none had received treatment for a psychiatric illness.
PubMed ID
16186200 View in PubMed
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Step-parents and infanticide: new data contradict evolutionary predictions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32736
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2000 May 7;267(1446):943-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-7-2000
Author
H. Temrin
S. Buchmayer
M. Enquist
Author Affiliation
Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2000 May 7;267(1446):943-5
Date
May-7-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Evolution
Female
Homicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infanticide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Parents - psychology
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Evolutionary psychologists have hypothesized, inspired by evolutionary biology, that parents should care less for children with whom they are not genetically related since these young do not contribute to the genetic fitness of the parents. Based on this, evolutionary psychologists have predicted that there will be an overrepresentation of step-parents as offenders in family-related killings of children. Data on child homicide, particularly from Canada, have supported this prediction in that the frequency of children killed was relatively high in families where one of the two parents was a step-parent. Here we present a survey of all child homicide that occurred in Sweden between 1975 and 1995. In contrast to the Canadian data, children in Sweden living in families with a step-parent were not at an increased risk compared with children living together with two parents to whom they were genetically related. In addition, there were no other indications that step-parents are overrepresented as offenders.
PubMed ID
10853739 View in PubMed
Less detail