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[4 generations of different deliveries--only women around greatgrandmother]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60128
Source
Vardfacket. 1987 Apr 28;11(8):32-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-28-1987

Acupuncture reduces crying in infants with infantile colic: a randomised, controlled, blind clinical study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139981
Source
Acupunct Med. 2010 Dec;28(4):174-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Kajsa Landgren
Nina Kvorning
Inger Hallström
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Kajsa.Landgren@med.lu.se
Source
Acupunct Med. 2010 Dec;28(4):174-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Points
Acupuncture Therapy - methods
Colic - therapy
Crying
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior - physiology
Infant Care - methods
Infant, Newborn
Male
Single-Blind Method
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To investigate whether acupuncture reduces the duration and intensity of crying in infants with colic. Patients and methods 90 otherwise healthy infants, 2-8 weeks old, with infantile colic were randomised in this controlled blind study. 81 completed a structured programme consisting of six visits during 3 weeks to an acupuncture clinic in Sweden. Parents blinded to the allocation of their children met a blinded nurse. The infant was subsequently given to another nurse in a separate room, who handled all infants similarly except that infants allocated to receive acupuncture were given minimal, standardised acupuncture for 2 s in LI4.
There was a difference (p=0.034) favouring the acupuncture group in the time which passed from inclusion until the infant no longer met the criteria for colic. The duration of fussing was lower in the acupuncture group the first (74 vs 129 min; p=0.029) and second week (71 vs 102 min; p=0.047) as well as the duration of colicky crying in the second intervention week (9 vs 13 min; p=0.046) was lower in the acupuncture group. The total duration of fussing, crying and colicky crying (TC) was lower in the acupuncture group during the first (193 vs 225 min; p=0.025) and the second intervention week (164 vs 188 min; p=0.016). The relative difference from baseline throughout the intervention weeks showed differences between groups for fussing in the first week (22 vs 6 min; p=0.028), for colicky crying in the second week (92 vs 73 min; p=0.041) and for TC in the second week (44 vs 29 min; p=0.024), demonstrating favour towards the acupuncture group.
Minimal acupuncture shortened the duration and reduced the intensity of crying in infants with colic. Further research using different acupuncture points, needle techniques and intervals between treatments is required.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20959312 View in PubMed
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[A description of a Swedish midwifery work environment in an assistance project in West africa]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36881
Source
Jordemodern. 1992 Jan-Feb;105(1-2):20-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Adolfsson
Source
Jordemodern. 1992 Jan-Feb;105(1-2):20-3
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Africa, Western
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant care
Infant, Newborn
Maternal health services
Midwifery
Pregnancy
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
The routine daily consultation in the health post of 1 of 10 project villages for pregnant women and children under age 5 is interrupted by a call to an emergency delivery which ends up with the birth of a baby girl weighing 2100 g who is named after the author. Under the project funded by SIDA, Stockholm, a local village committee was elected to open a dispensary which became well-attended. Due to visits to another nearby village, the number of children checked increased to 263 instead of the previous number of 147 per month. The weight status of children was worsening despite vaccination and nutritional advice, because women worked in the fields without taking a meal break for their children. After advising that several meals a day were needed, the children gained weight in the following months. A lecture by the project doctor to representatives of surrounding villages about the safety of delivery in the dispensary or the hospital elicited a positive response to send pregnant women there for delivery. The number of institutional deliveries had already increased from 249 in 1986 to 433 in 1989. Working in a developing country required preliminary preparations, French and English language study, a 4-week cultural orientation course organized by the International Child Health Unit, and reading professional books on obstetrics and gynecology in such countries.
PubMed ID
1544861 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' perceptions of inpatient postpartum nursing care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165660
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Feb;17(2):201-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Wendy E Peterson
Wendy Sword
Cathy Charles
Alba DiCenso
Author Affiliation
Clinical Health Sciences (Nursing) program, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Feb;17(2):201-12
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Feeding - psychology
Female
Humans
Infant care
Infant, Newborn
Interviews as Topic
Maternal-Child Nursing - standards
Mothers - education - psychology
Narration
Nurse-Patient Relations
Ontario
Patient satisfaction
Postnatal Care - psychology - standards
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - psychology
Pregnancy in Adolescence - psychology
Abstract
The authors used a transcendental phenomenological approach to describe adolescent mothers' satisfactory and unsatisfactory inpatient postpartum nursing care experiences. They analyzed data from 14 in-depth interviews and found that adolescent mothers' satisfaction is dependent on their perceptions of the nurse's ability to place them "at ease." Nursing care qualities that contributed to satisfactory experiences included nurses' sharing information about themselves, being calm, demonstrating confidence in mothers, speaking to adolescent and adult mothers in the same way, and anticipating unstated needs. Nursing care was perceived to be unsatisfactory when it was too serious, limited to the job required, or different from care to adult mothers, or when nurses failed to recognize individual needs. In extreme cases, unsatisfactory experiences hindered development of an effective nurse-client relationship. These findings illustrate the value of qualitative inquiry for understanding patients' satisfaction with care, can be used for self-reflection, and have implications for nursing education programs.
PubMed ID
17220391 View in PubMed
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Advances in perinatal care and declining regional neonatal mortality in Finland, 1968-82.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237049
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1986 May;75(3):362-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1986
Author
A. Tenovuo
P. Kero
P. Piekkala
M. Sillanpää
R. Erkkola
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1986 May;75(3):362-9
Date
May-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asphyxia Neonatorum - mortality
Bacterial Infections - mortality
Birth weight
Cerebral Hemorrhage - mortality
Child Welfare
Congenital Abnormalities - mortality
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Finland
Humans
Infant care
Infant mortality
Infant Welfare
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - mortality
Virus Diseases - mortality
Abstract
Neonatal mortality (NNM) was investigated in the region of the University Central Hospital of Turku (UCHT), Finland, during a 15-year period from 1968 till 1982. During the study period 81 620 liveborn infants were born. The NNM rate declined from 13.5 in 1968 to 3.0 in 1982 during the study period. Significant declines occurred in NNM due to respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and asphyxia. The decline in NNM was more obvious during the early neonatal period (0-6 days after birth) and in the low birth weight (LBW) group (BW less than 2500 g). We believe that centralization of obstetric and neonatal services in risk cases and the new neonatal intensive care accounted for the decline in NNM.
PubMed ID
3727999 View in PubMed
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[Aftercare of newborn infants in a patient hotel]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58759
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 May 10;120(12):1409-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-2000
Author
C. Lindgren
Author Affiliation
Barneintensiv avdeling, Kvinne-barn klinikken, Barnesentret Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 May 10;120(12):1409-11
Date
May-10-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aftercare
English Abstract
Evaluation Studies
Female
Humans
Infant care
Infant Welfare
Infant, Newborn
Length of Stay
Maternal Welfare
Maternal-Child Nursing
Norway
Patient Discharge
Patient Readmission
Postnatal Care
Postpartum Period
Pregnancy
Referral and Consultation
Safety
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Postnatal care of the healthy term newborn and the mother has, in modern times, taken place in the hospital setting. As a result of tightened hospital budgets as well as maternal preferences the duration of hospital stay has successively been shortened. Most women in Scandinavia today leave the hospital within four days after delivery. Postnatal care in a hotel like setting has emerged as an alternative to the well-baby nursery unless medical conditions makes this option inappropriate. MATERIAL AND METHODS: To evaluate the safety of postnatal care a study was undertaken to investigate whether correct criteria were being used for referral of the newborn to the hotel. We also wanted to document the duration of stay, unexpected medical complications, and weight development of the infants. Data from 865 infants were used for analysis. RESULTS: Ten (1.1%) newborns had to be readmitted to the hospital due to medical complications. 488 (56%) of the mothers went home within 96 hours, and only 23 (2.6%) stayed more than 120 hours. The weight of the infants reached a nadir on the fourth day post partum (-5.2% of birth weight). INTERPRETATION: The patient hotel is a medically safe alternative to the traditional well-baby nursery, provided that appropriate criteria for referral are used.
PubMed ID
10851936 View in PubMed
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[A German male nurse in Iceland. Report of experiences].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235409
Source
Krankenpflege (Frankf). 1987 Apr;41(4):147-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1987
Author
N. Müller
Source
Krankenpflege (Frankf). 1987 Apr;41(4):147-8
Date
Apr-1987
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Iceland
Infant care
Language
Male
Pediatric Nursing
PubMed ID
3108578 View in PubMed
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Airborne enteric micro-organisms and ammonia levels in diaper-changing rooms in kindergartens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126489
Source
Lett Appl Microbiol. 2012 May;54(5):462-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
P E Vaattovaara
M. Kivimäenpää
P. Vaattovaara
P. Pasanen
H. Heinonen-Tanski
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. piia.vaattovaara@uef.fi
Source
Lett Appl Microbiol. 2012 May;54(5):462-7
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Ammonia - analysis
Finland
Humans
Incontinence Pads
Infant
Infant care
Abstract
We evaluated risks associated with diaper changing in Finnish kindergartens where children were using either modern disposable paper or reusable cloth diapers.
We determined enteric micro-organisms and ammonia in diaper-changing rooms in four kindergartens in autumn and winter in the ambient air. No coliphages were detected in the air. The numbers of faecal coliforms and enterococci in air were typically low regardless of whether the children used either paper or cloth diapers. Ammonia concentrations increased over the background level because of diaper changing.
The numbers of bacteria or coliphages are not expected to pose any high air hygiene risks, and increased ammonia air concentrations are unlikely to impair the health of staff or children when diapers are changed in modern kindergartens. However, increased ammonia gas concentrations indicate that some other diaper-related gas-phase emissions should be studied to understand better diaper-related health risks.
Modern reusable cloth baby diapers and the modern paper baby diapers used in this study are equally safe with respect to risks from airborne virus, bacteria or ammonia.
PubMed ID
22385430 View in PubMed
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Among the Chiglit Eskimos. Translation of Les Grands Esquimaux by E.O. Höhn.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1947
Source
Boreal Institute for Northern Studies, Edmonton, Alberta. Occasional Studies 10. 202 pp.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1981
Author
Petitot, E.
Source
Boreal Institute for Northern Studies, Edmonton, Alberta. Occasional Studies 10. 202 pp.
Date
1981
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Epidemics
Tobacco
Labrets
Skin infections
Sanitation
Personal hygiene
Eye diseases
Pediculosis
Tattoos
Infant care
Incest
Dropsy
Measles
Health services
Skin ulcer
Homicide
Sorcery
Shaman
Shamanic healing
Traditional surgery
Trauma
Notes
Alaska Medical Library - From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 372.
UAA/APU Consortium, Alaskana Collection E99 E7 P452 1981
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395 records – page 1 of 40.