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Address unknown--or at least uncertain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206146
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Mar 10;158(5):585-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-1998
Author
J J McGurran
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Mar 10;158(5):585-6
Date
Mar-10-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Data Collection - methods
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Vital statistics
Notes
Comment On: CMAJ. 1997 Sep 1;157(5):535-419294392
Comment On: CMAJ. 1997 Sep 1;157(5):549-519294395
PubMed ID
9526467 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adverse reproduction outcomes among employees working in biomedical research laboratories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58543
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Feb;28(1):5-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Helena Wennborg
Jens Peter Bonde
Magnus Stenbeck
Jørn Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences, Novum Research Park, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. helena.wennborg@biosci.ki.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Feb;28(1):5-11
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology - etiology
Birth weight
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Laboratory Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Obstetric Labor, Premature - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupational Health
Pregnancy
Reference Values
Research
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate reproductive outcomes such as birthweight, preterm births, and postterrm births among women working in research laboratories while pregnant. METHODS: Female university personnel were identified from a source cohort of Swedish laboratory employees, and the database was linked to the medical birth register. The first births of the women were included in the analysis, 249 pregnancies among the women with laboratory work and 613 pregnancies among the women without laboratory tasks. Information about exposure to various laboratory agents was obtained from a previous questionnaire investigation at the research group level according to a specific definition. The ponderal index and ratio between observed and expected birthweights were calculated. Logistic regression models were used for analyses of dichotomous outcomes (preterm, postterrm and birthweight). RESULTS: Exposure to laboratory work with solvents was associated with an increased risk of preterm births, the estimated odds ratio (OR) being 3.4 (1.0
PubMed ID
11871853 View in PubMed
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Alberta's infant mortality rate: the effect of the registration of live newborns weighing less than 500 grams.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205198
Source
Can J Public Health. 1998 May-Jun;89(3):188-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
L W Svenson
D P Schopflocher
R S Sauve
C M Robertson
Author Affiliation
Health Surveillance Branch, Alberta Health, Edmonton. svensl@mail.health.gov.ab.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 1998 May-Jun;89(3):188-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Humans
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Registries
PubMed ID
9654805 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol drinking pattern during pregnancy and risk of infant mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148237
Source
Epidemiology. 2009 Nov;20(6):884-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Katrine Strandberg-Larsen
Morten Grønboek
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Per Kragh Andersen
Jørn Olsen
Author Affiliation
Centre for Alcohol Research, National Institute of Public Health,University of Southern Denmark, Denmark. kstrandberg-larsen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Epidemiology. 2009 Nov;20(6):884-91
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - pathology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - mortality
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
The safety of small amounts of alcohol drinking and occasional binge-level drinking during pregnancy remains unsettled. We examined the association of maternal average alcohol intake and binge drinking (>or=5 drinks per sitting) with infant mortality, both in the neonatal and postneonatal period.
Participants were 79,216 mothers who were enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort in 1996-2002, gave birth to a live-born singleton, and provided information while they were pregnant on alcohol consumption during pregnancy. Information on infant mortality and causes of death was obtained from national registries and medical records.
During the first year of life, 279 children (0.35%) died, 204 during the neonatal period. Infant mortality was not associated with alcohol drinking, even at a consumption level of either 4+ drinks per week or 3+ occasions of binge drinking. Postneonatal mortality was associated with an intake of 4+ drinks per week (hazard ratio = 3.56 [95% confidence interval = 1.15-8.43]) and with 3+ binge episodes (2.69 [1.27-5.69]). When restricting analyses to term births, both infant mortality and postneonatal mortality were associated with a weekly average intake of 4+ drinks or 3+ binge episodes.
Among term infants, intake of at least 4 drinks of alcohol per week or binging on 3 or more occasions during pregnancy are associated with an increased risk of infant mortality, especially during the postneonatal period.
PubMed ID
19797967 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of the structure and specific features of maternal and infant mortality according to the data of Forensic Medical Examination Bureau and Pathologic Anatomy Bureau for 2002-2006].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150455
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 2009 Mar-Apr;52(2):3-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
V A Klevno
V D Isakov
G V Pavlova
A O Pravodelova
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 2009 Mar-Apr;52(2):3-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Forensic Pathology
Government Agencies
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Mortality - trends
Perinatal Mortality - trends
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Russia - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The present analysis of maternal and infant (under 1 year of age) mortality is based on the data for the period from 2002 to 2006 that have come to the address of the All-Russia scientific and practical conference "Topical issues of forensic medical examination of the human corpse" (5-6 June 2008, Sankt-Peterburg). The materials were collected using a standard questionnaire form distributed among regional forensic-medical examination bureaus an pathologic anatomy departments. The questionnaire comprised over 50 questions. The study revealed a steady tendency toward a decrease in maternal and infant mortality in the Russian Federation as a whole and in its different regions. The study included analysis of similarities and differences in the mortality rates reported by forensic-medical examination bureaus and pathologic anatomy departments of the country and in the technical approaches practiced by them.
PubMed ID
19507731 View in PubMed
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Apparent truth about congenital diaphragmatic hernia: a population-based database is needed to establish benchmarking for clinical outcomes for CDH.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180166
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2004 May;39(5):661-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2004 May;39(5):661-5
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases, Factual
Hernia, Diaphragmatic - congenital - mortality
Humans
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Medical Records
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Vital statistics
Abstract
The authors hypothesize that recent single or multiinstitution-based reports of improved survival of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) patients are biased by patient selection, practice, and referral patterns. Here the authors report a population-based analysis of the clinical outcomes of CDH in the province of Ontario for 1996.
A retrospective analysis of cross-sectional data from the Bureau of Vital Statistics of Ontario and all 5 pediatric surgical institutions in Ontario for 1996 was performed.
Twenty-four CDH-associated deaths were registered in Canada in 1996. Fourteen of 24 occurred in Ontario (58.3%). Of 30 institutionally identified CDH in Ontario, 8 patients died (26.7%). CDH-associated infant mortality rate was 6.6 of 100,000 live births in Canada compared with 10 of 100,000 live births for Ontario (Relative risk, 1.4; confidence interval, 0.5, 3.7; P >.01). Neonatal death (
PubMed ID
15136995 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Are better prenatal care and larger maternity wards the answer to the problem of stagnating perinatal mortality?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59615
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 May 25;154(22):1578-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-25-1992

Assessment of health policy in Costa Rica--some preliminary remarks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8305
Source
Scand J Soc Med Suppl. 1991;46:82-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
C G Eriksson
E. Mohs
B. Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, Göteborg.
Source
Scand J Soc Med Suppl. 1991;46:82-91
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Costa Rica - epidemiology
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Health Planning - standards
Health Policy
Health Priorities
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Mortality - trends
Policy Making
Politics
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Costa Rica is one of the world's success stories in primary health care. During the past 20 years the country has experienced a demographic and epidemiological transition. However, during the 80's the economic recession severely affected the country. The social, economic, political and geographic contexts are important for the assessment of health policy. The longstanding democracy, investments in public education and health all contribute to the peace and stability. Assessment of health policy needs both a quantitative and qualitative approach. The policy-making process--how policies are made, translated into action and evaluated--is a research challenge. The national health policy 1986-1990 includes commitment to Health for All strategy; development of the National Health Care System; strengthening of the health care infrastructure; consolidation of health achievements and undertaking of new problems and approaches on integral care for the population; community participation in all health care system activities; and health care priorities. Important research issues are the relationship between the needs of the population and health policy development and the impacts of health policy on the health of the population. A comprehensive study of policy-making includes studies of policy content, process, output and evaluation of impacts (including economy of health policy), and analysis for policy, i.e. information for policy making, process and policy advocacy. Recent successful health policy issues are child health and HIV/AIDS, while water pollution and traffic accidents have been more problematic policy issues.
PubMed ID
1805372 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between Apgar scores of 7 to 9 and neonatal mortality and morbidity: population based cohort study of term infants in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300008
Source
BMJ. 2019 05 07; 365:l1656
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-07-2019
Author
Neda Razaz
Sven Cnattingius
K S Joseph
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden neda.razaz@gmail.com.
Source
BMJ. 2019 05 07; 365:l1656
Date
05-07-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Apgar score
Body mass index
Educational Status
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - mortality
Male
Maternal Age
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Term Birth
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate associations between Apgar scores of 7, 8, and 9 (versus 10) at 1, 5, and 10 minutes, and neonatal mortality and morbidity.
Population based cohort study.
Sweden.
1?551?436 non-malformed live singleton infants, born at term (=37 weeks' gestation) between 1999 and 2016, with Apgar scores of =7 at 1, 5, and 10 minutes.
Infants with Apgar scores of 7, 8, and 9 at 1, 5, and 10 minutes were compared with those with an Apgar score of 10 at 1, 5, and 10 minutes, respectively.
Neonatal mortality and morbidity, including neonatal infections, asphyxia related complications, respiratory distress, and neonatal hypoglycaemia. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR), adjusted rate differences (aRD), and 95% confidence intervals were estimated.
Compared with infants with an Apgar score of 10, aORs for neonatal mortality, neonatal infections, asphyxia related complications, respiratory distress, and neonatal hypoglycaemia were higher among infants with lower Apgar scores, especially at 5 and 10 minutes. For example, the aORs for respiratory distress for an Apgar score of 9 versus 10 were 2.0 (95% confidence interval 1.9 to 2.1) at 1 minute, 5.2 (5.1 to 5.4) at 5 minutes, and 12.4 (12.0 to 12.9) at 10 minutes. Compared with an Apgar score of 10 at 10 minutes, the aRD for respiratory distress was 9.5% (95% confidence interval 9.2% to 9.9%) for an Apgar score of 9 at 10 minutes, and 41.9% (37.7% to 46.4%) for an Apgar score of 7 at 10 minutes. A reduction in Apgar score from 10 at 5 minutes to 9 at 10 minutes was also associated with higher odds of neonatal morbidity, compared with a stable Apgar score of 10 at 5 and 10 minutes.
In term non-malformed infants with Apgar scores within the normal range (7 to 10), risks of neonatal mortality and morbidity are higher among infants with lower Apgar score values, and also among those experiencing a reduction in score from 5 minutes to 10 minutes (compared with infants with stable Apgar scores of 10).
PubMed ID
31064770 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between maternal education and postneonatal mortality. Trends in Norway, 1968-1991.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34777
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Jun;25(3):578-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
A. Arntzen
T. Moum
P. Magnus
L S Bakketeig
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Health Sciences, National Institute of Public Health, Norway.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Jun;25(3):578-84
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality - trends
Mothers
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND. This study examines whether the association between maternal educational level and postneonatal death has changed over time. METHODS. All single survivors of the neonatal period in Norway in three periods, 1968-1971, 1978-1981 and 1989-1991 were studied. There were 582 046 births and 1717 postneonatal deaths. Logistic regression analyses were applied. RESULTS. There has been an increasing inverse relationship between maternal educational level and postneonatal mortality in recent years. There was no statistically significant association between educational level and postneonatal mortality in the late 1960s. In the second period (1978-1981) the association is statistically significant for first-born children. In the third period (1989-1991) postneonatal mortality for first-born and later-born children was associated with maternal educational level, with adjusted odds ratios of 2.5 and 2.1 respectively. The overall level of education has increased tremendously, and the proportion of women with the lowest level of education has decreased from 56.3 to 10.7% in the period under study. CONCLUSIONS. The underlying causes of changes in the impact of educational level are hard to determine and are indicative of the complexity of using maternal educational level as an indicator of social status over time. Possible mechanisms by which certain variables may covary with educational level, and thus have an adverse effect on postneonatal mortality, are discussed. The fact that the inverse association between educational level and postneonatal mortality has increased over time should be a matter for concern. It may indicate that the growth of the welfare state has not reached all segments of the population.
PubMed ID
8671559 View in PubMed
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210 records – page 1 of 21.